Our Black Year

Our Black Year

Our Black Year

Maggie and John Anderson were successful African American professionals raising two daughters in a tony suburb of Chicago. But they felt uneasy over their good fortune. Most African Americans live in economically starved neighborhoods. Black wealth is about one tenth of white wealth, and black businesses lag behind businesses of all other racial groups in every measure of success. One problem is that black consumers--unlike consumers of other ethnicities-- choose not to support black-owned businesses. At the same time, most of the businesses in their communities are owned by outsiders. On January 1, 2009 the Andersons embarked on a year-long public pledge to "buy black." They thought that by taking a stand, the black community would be mobilized to exert its economic might. They thought that by exposing the issues, Americans of all races would see that economically empowering black neighborhoods benefits society as a whole. Instead, blacks refused to support their own, and others condemned their experiment. Drawing on economic research and social history as well as her personal story, Maggie Anderson shows why the black economy continues to suffer and issues a call to action to all of us to do our part to reverse this trend.

Our Black Year

Our Black Year

Our Black Year

Maggie and John Anderson were successful African American professionals raising two daughters in a tony suburb of Chicago. But they felt uneasy over their good fortune. Most African Americans live in economically starved neighborhoods. Black wealth is about one tenth of white wealth, and black businesses lag behind businesses of all other racial groups in every measure of success. One problem is that black consumers -- unlike consumers of other ethnicities -- choose not to support black-owned businesses. At the same time, most of the businesses in their communities are owned by outsiders. On January 1, 2009 the Andersons embarked on a year-long public pledge to "buy black." They thought that by taking a stand, the black community would be mobilized to exert its economic might. They thought that by exposing the issues, Americans of all races would see that economically empowering black neighborhoods benefits society as a whole. Instead, blacks refused to support their own, and others condemned their experiment. Drawing on economic research and social history as well as her personal story, Maggie Anderson shows why the black economy continues to suffer and issues a call to action to all of us to do our part to reverse this trend.

Shepherd

Shepherd

Shepherd


Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report


Delays in Processing and Adjudicating Black Lung Claims

Delays in Processing and Adjudicating Black Lung Claims

Delays in Processing and Adjudicating Black Lung Claims


The Bakke Decision

The Bakke Decision

The Bakke Decision


The African American Studies Reader

The African American Studies Reader

The African American Studies Reader

African-American Studies is a unique field of scholarly inquiry and critical interpretation whose intellectual foundation and development have significantly influenced other disciplines in the academy. The African-American Studies Reader is the largest and most comprehensive anthology yet undertaken in the field. A variety of perspectives are used to present the development of the discipline of African-American Studies. This volume's sixty-one articles are organized into eight sections: (I) The Discipline: Definition and Perspectives; (II) African-American Women's Studies; (III) Historical Perspectives; (IV) Philosophical Perspectives; (V) Theoretical Foundation; (VI) Political Perspectives; (VII) Critical Issues and Perspectives; and (VIII) Curriculum Development and Program Models. This comprehensive anthology includes key selections from many scholars who have made substantial contributions to the development of the discipline. They argue many different perspectives and topics relevant to the study of African American Studies as an intellectual, social, and political focus in/of higher education; they provide discussions of the intellectual and academic roots of the field; they describe the conditions that made its emergence possible; they present its theoretical, research, ideological, and philosophical paradigms; and they examine the past, present and future challenges of African-American Studies. The African-American Studies Reader is an invaluable complement to basic books in the discipline and can be used as an introductory text for graduate and undergraduate courses in the field. It provides an essential guide to enable students to understand how the field evolved, therange of perspectives it encompasses, and the challenge and future directions of African-American Studies. This outstanding collection of various perspectives in African-American Studies will be of interest to individuals new to the field as well as those already involved in research, teaching, and other aspects of African-American Studies.

Is My Armor Straight

Is My Armor Straight

Is My Armor Straight

In this diary, the president of the American University in Washington, D.C., reveals the academic, political, financial, and social complexities of running a university