Pygmalion s Metamorphosis and Galatea s Revenge Feminist Revisions of Ovid s Pygmalion Myth in British and American Literature since the 20th Century

Pygmalion   s Metamorphosis and Galatea   s Revenge  Feminist Revisions of Ovid   s Pygmalion Myth in British and American Literature since the 20th Century

Pygmalion s Metamorphosis and Galatea s Revenge Feminist Revisions of Ovid s Pygmalion Myth in British and American Literature since the 20th Century

Bachelor Thesis from the year 2010 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,5, University of Regensburg, language: English, abstract: The myth of Pygmalion as told by Ovid in his Metamorphoses contains, according to Geoffrey Miles, “one of the most potent male fantasies” – that is the creation “of a perfectly beautiful woman designed to the lover’s specifications and utterly devoted to her creator”. The fact that Pygmalion’s literally man-made lover comes to life at the end of the story probably was the reason for artists’ fascination with the myth. Ever since antiquity, patriarchal literature produced countless renarrations of the story about Pygmalion’s love for his statue, and most of them were especially intrigued with the erotic potential of Ovid’s tale. Yet this leads to the question how the awakening of feminist thought since the early 20th century influenced the myth’s reception. More precisely, how did feminist versions of the tale alter its content and the relationship of its protagonists? This question forms the basis of this thesis paper which will examine, by means of several Pygmalion versions of the 20th and 21st centuries, the myth’s development from a patriarchal towards a feminist tale. Texts by authors like Angela Carter, Neil LaBute, G.B. Shaw and others will be analysed.

Locating Classical Receptions on Screen

Locating Classical Receptions on Screen

Locating Classical Receptions on Screen

This volume explores film and television sources in problematic conversation with classical antiquity, to better understand the nature of artistic reception and classical reception in particular. Drawing inspiration from well-theorized fields like adaptation studies, comparative literature, and film, the essays in this collection raise questions fundamental to the future of reception studies. The first section, ‘Beyond Fidelity’, deals with idiosyncratic adaptations of ancient sources; the second section, ‘Beyond Influence’, discusses modern works purporting to adapt ancient figures or themes that are less straightforwardly ancient than they may at first appear; while the last section, ‘Beyond Original’, uses films that lack even these murky connections to antiquity to challenge the notion that studying reception requires establishing historical connections between works. As questions of audience, interpretation, and subjectivity are central to most contemporary fields of study, this is a collection that is of interest to a wide variety of readers in the humanities.

Screening Statues

Screening Statues

Screening Statues

This collection charts the lives and times of Muslims living in contemporary Scotland

Ovid Myth and Metamorphosis

Ovid  Myth and Metamorphosis

Ovid Myth and Metamorphosis

The impact of Ovid's Metamorphoses on our culture can hardly be overestimated. The poem is one of the most exciting and accessible classical texts, our key source for nearly all the famous myths of Greece and Rome. Sarah Annes Brown offers a lively, and sometimes provocative, introduction to the Metamorphoses, exploring the impact of recent critical developments and tracing its rich afterlife in both high and popular culture. The book's later chapters are devoted to five of the most memorable Ovidian stories - Apollo and Daphne, Actaeon, Philomela, Arachne and Pygmalion. Each subtle and elusive story is found to have generated a huge range of creative responses. The influence of the Pygmalion myth, for example, can be traced in Frankenstein, Vertigo and Blade Runner, as well as in the works of Chaucer and Shakespeare.

Pygmalion s Metamorphosis and Galatea s Revenge Feminist Revisions of Ovid s Pygmalion Myth in British and American Literature Since the 20th Century

Pygmalion s Metamorphosis and Galatea s Revenge  Feminist Revisions of Ovid s Pygmalion Myth in British and American Literature Since the 20th Century

Pygmalion s Metamorphosis and Galatea s Revenge Feminist Revisions of Ovid s Pygmalion Myth in British and American Literature Since the 20th Century

Bachelor Thesis from the year 2010 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Literature, grade: 2,5, University of Regensburg, language: English, abstract: The myth of Pygmalion as told by Ovid in his Metamorphoses contains, according to Geoffrey Miles, "one of the most potent male fantasies" - that is the creation "of a perfectly beautiful woman designed to the lover's specifications and utterly devoted to her creator." The fact that Pygmalion's literally man-made lover comes to life at the end of the story probably was the reason for artists' fascination with the myth. Ever since antiquity, patriarchal literature produced countless renarrations of the story about Pygmalion's love for his statue, and most of them were especially intrigued with the erotic potential of Ovid's tale. Yet this leads to the question how the awakening of feminist thought since the early 20th century influenced the myth's reception. More precisely, how did feminist versions of the tale alter its content and the relationship of its protagonists? This question forms the basis of this thesis paper which will examine, by means of several Pygmalion versions of the 20th and 21st centuries, the myth's development from a patriarchal towards a feminist tale. Texts by authors like Angela Carter, Neil LaBute, G.B. Shaw and others will be analysed.

Galatea s Emancipation The Transformation of the Pygmalion Myth in Anglo Saxon Literature since the 20th Century

Galatea s Emancipation  The Transformation of the Pygmalion Myth in Anglo Saxon Literature since the 20th Century

Galatea s Emancipation The Transformation of the Pygmalion Myth in Anglo Saxon Literature since the 20th Century

The Pygmalion myth, most famously told by Ovid in his Metamorphoses, has always fascinated artists. This fascination, due to the erotic potential of the story, resulted in an abundance of patriarchal re-narrations from the Middle Ages to the late 19th century. With the turn of the 20th century, however, the Pygmalion stories gradually changed under the influence of feminist thought and emancipation. The woman created by Pygmalion no longer remained a passive creature but began to resist her master and his male fantasies, sometimes in a subtle way, sometimes in open rebellion. The study at hand focuses on the development of the tale in the Anglo-Saxon literature of the 20th and 21st centuries. The author will analyze some of these modern Pygmalion versions, written by George Bernard Shaw, Carol Ann Duffy and Neil LaBute amongst other significant author

The Pygmalion Effect

The Pygmalion Effect

The Pygmalion Effect

Pygmalion's sculpture, which the gods endowed with life, marks, according to this book, perhaps the first instance in Western art of an image that exists on its own terms, rather than simply imitating something else. Stoichita delivers this image and its avatars from the shadow cast by art that merely replicates reality.

Pygmalion

Pygmalion

Pygmalion

Presents a critical introduction to Shaw's classic drama, covering characterization, plot, symbolism, and setting.

Reading Ovid

Reading Ovid

Reading Ovid

Presents a selection from Metamorphoses, designed for those who have completed an introductory Latin course.