Paris from Above

Paris from Above

Paris from Above

Yann Arthus-Bertrand, internationally bestselling photographer of The Earth From Above, shares over 200 aerial photographs of the City of Light. The unique point of view shows Paris in a completely different way: the reader will take a dive into cosy little streets, rooftops, courtyards, monuments... the unique poetry of each neighborhood is highlighted. In a way that is impossible from street level, you can see the old neighborhoods of Montmartre, Montparnasse and Menilmontant; iconic historical monuments like the Eiffel Tower, Notre-Dame or the Invalides; or perhaps modern Paris like La Defense or the new neighborhoods around the Bibliotheque nationale. Organized around the major quarters (the banks of the Seine, Ile de la Cite and Ile Saint-Louis, Saint-Germain-des-Pres, Luxembourg, the Latin Quarter; Austerlitz-Tolbiac, "Chinatown"; Orsay, les Invalides; Montparnasse, Denfert-Rochereau; the Eiffel Tower, the Champ de Mars, Trocadero; l Etoile, the Champs-Elysees, Place de la Concorde; Madeleine, the Opera; Pigalle, Montmartre; canal Saint-Martin, Belleville, Menilmontant, Oberkampf, Pere Lachaise; Bastille, the Marais, les Halles; the Louvre, Palais-Royal, les Tuileries; la Defense), this bilingual edition paints an intimate and unique portrait of Paris, the city of lights. Text in English and French."

Above Paris

Above Paris

Above Paris

Above Paris is Henrardbs remarkable study of the urban landscape of Paris and its best-known monuments. Over 350 beautifully printed duotones, systematically grouped by themes such as the course of the Seine, the main roads, the stations, and the neighborhoods of Paris give a clear overview of the citybs layout. Maps at the beginning of each chapter further help orient the reader and together with detailed captions and essays by Jean-Louis Cohen make Above Paris a must for anybody.

The View from Above

The View from Above

The View from Above

The role of aerial photography in the evolution of the concept of social space”and its impact on French urban planning in the mid-twentieth century. In mid-twentieth century France, the term “social space” (l'espace social)—the idea that spatial form and social life are inextricably linked—emerged in a variety of social science disciplines. Taken up by the French New Left, it also came to inform the practice of urban planning. In The View from Above, Jeanne Haffner traces the evolution of the science of social space from the interwar period to the 1970s, illuminating in particular the role of aerial photography in this new way of conceptualizing socio-spatial relations. As early as the 1930s, the view from above served for Marcel Griaule and other anthropologists as a means of connecting the social and the spatial. Just a few decades later, the Marxist urban sociologist Henri Lefebvre called the perspective enabled by aerial photography—a technique closely associated with the French colonial state and military—“the space of state control.” Lefebvre and others nevertheless used the notion of social space to recast the problem of massive modernist housing projects (grands ensembles) to encompass the modern suburb (banlieue) itself—a critique that has contemporary resonance in light of the banlieue riots of 2005 and 2007. Haffner shows how such “views” permitted new ways of conceptualizing the old problem of housing to emerge. She also points to broader issues, including the influence of the colonies on the metropole, the application of sociological expertise to the study of the built environment, and the development of a spatially oriented critique of capitalism.