Philosophy

Philosophy

Philosophy


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An Examination of Sir William Hamilton s Philosophy

An Examination of Sir William Hamilton s Philosophy

An Examination of Sir William Hamilton s Philosophy

One of the foremost figures of Western intellectual thought in the late 19th century, John Stuart Mill offered up examinations of human rights, personal and societal rights and responsibilities, and the striving for individual happiness that continue to impact our philosophies, both private and political, to this day. In this comprehensive rebuttal to the thinking of a preeminent philosopher of his time-one now, ironically, best remembered for Mill's critique-Mill explains why Hamilton's views on the limitations of human knowledge were, to Mil's thinking, wrong, and in the process, lays out his own ideas on the freedom of human will. In this provocative volume is where we find Mill's doctrine of the "permanent possibility of sensation," which encompasses the mind's interaction with the external world. First published in 1865, this is a replica of the 1889 third edition, and will be of interest to students of Mill's philosophy, and to the development of philosophical thought in the 19th century. English philosopher and politician JOHN STUART MILL (1806-1873) served as an administrator in the East Indian Company from 1823 to 1858, and as a member of parliament from 1865 to 1868. Among his essays on a wide range of political and social thought are Principles of Political Economy (1848), Considerations on Representative Government (1861), and The Subjection of Women (1869).