Philosophy through Film

Philosophy through Film

Philosophy through Film

Many of the classic questions of philosophy have been raised, illuminated, and addressed in celluloid. In this Third Edition of Philosophy through Film, Mary M. Litch teams up with a new co-author, Amy Karofsky, to show readers how to watch films with a sharp eye for their philosophical content. Together, the authors help students become familiar with key topics in all of the major areas in Western philosophy and master the techniques of philosophical argumentation. The perfect size and scope for a first course in philosophy, the book assumes no prior knowledge of philosophy. It is an excellent teaching resource and learning tool, introducing students to key topics and figures in philosophy through thematic chapters, each of which is linked to one or more "focus films" that illustrate a philosophical problem or topic. Revised and expanded, the Third Edition features: A completely revised chapter on "Relativism," now re-titled "Truth" with coverage of the correspondence theory, the pragmatist theory, and the coherence theory. The addition of four new focus films: Inception, Moon, Gone Baby Gone, God on Trial. Revisions to the General Introduction that include a discussion of critical reasoning. Revisions to the primary readings to better meet the needs of instructors and students, including the addition of three new primary readings: excerpts from Bertrand Russell’s The Problems of Philosophy, from William James’ Pragmatism: A New Way for Some Old Ways of Thinking, and from J. L. Mackie’s "Evil and Omnipotence". Updates and expansion to the companion website, including a much expanded list of films relevant to the various subfields of philosophy. Films examined in depth include: Hilary and Jackie The Matrix Inception Memento Moon I, Robot Minority Report Crimes and Misdemeanors Gone Baby Gone Antz Equilibrium The Seventh Seal God on Trial Leaving Las Vegas

Philosophy Through Film

Philosophy Through Film

Philosophy Through Film

Philosophy Through Filmoffers a stimulating new way to explore the basic questions of philosophy. Each chapter uses a popular film to examine one such topic - from free will and skepticism to personal identity and artificial intelligence - in a approachable yet philosophically rigorous manner. A wide range of films are discussed including more recent releases like Being John Malkovich, Total Recall and Boys Don't Cry, and classics like Rashomonand Crimes and Misdemeanors, all readily available through major video rental chains. This unique and engaging introduction provides an exciting new way to learn about philosophy and connects complicated philosophical questions to the familiar settings of popular culture.

Introducing Philosophy Through Film

Introducing Philosophy Through Film

Introducing Philosophy Through Film

Philosophy Through Film offers a uniquely engaging and effective approach to introductory philosophy by combining an anthology of classical and contemporary philosophical readings with a discussion of philosophical concepts illustrated in popular films. Pairs 50 classical and contemporary readings with popular films - from Monty Python and The Matrix to Casablanca and A Clockwork Orange Addresses key areas in philosophy, including topics in ethics, philosophy of religion, philosophy of mind, free will and determinism, the problem of perception, and philosophy of time Each unit begins with an extensive introduction by the editors and ends with study questions linking readings to films Features chapter by chapter discussion of clips from films that vividly illustrate the critical philosophical arguments and positions raised in the readings

Philosophy Through Film

Philosophy Through Film

Philosophy Through Film

Some of the worldâe(tm)s best-loved films can be used as springboards for examining enduring philosophical questions. Philosophy Through Film provides guidance in how to watch films with an eye for their philosophical content, helping students become familiar with key topics in all of the major areas in Western philosophy, and helping them master the techniques of philosophical argumentation. The perfect size and scope for a first course in philosophy, Philosophy Through Film assumes no prior knowledge of philosophy. It is an excellent teaching resource and learning tool, introducing students to key topics and figures in philosophy through thematic chapters, each of which is linked to one or more "focus films" that illustrate a philosophical problem or topic. Revised and expanded, the Second Edition features a new chapter on political philosophy, an introductory chapter explaining how to watch films philosophically, an appendix with primary readings, and the addition of five new focus films. Films examined in depth include: The Matrix Vanilla Sky Hilary and Jackie Memento I, Robot Minority Report Crimes and Misdemeanors Antz Equilibrium The Seventh Seal The Rapture Leaving Las Vegas

Introduction to Philosophy Through Film

Introduction to Philosophy Through Film

Introduction to Philosophy Through Film

The question of whether it is always rational to act as morality requires goes at least as far back as Plato's "Republic." Woody Allen's "Crimes and Misdemeanors" poses a similar question. Judah Rosenthal wants to break off his affair with Dolores Paley, but Dolores does not want to go quietly. His brother proposes hiring a hitman to get rid of Dolores. If this plan is likely to succeed, isn't it rational for Judah to adopt it? Reni Descartes wondered how we can know that the world is as it appears, for how do we know that we are not dreaming or that an evil demon has not tricked us into thinking there is a real world outside of us? "The Matrix" raises the question of how we can know that the world is as it appears, for how do we know that our brains are not being stimulated by supercomputers creating a mere virtual reality for us?Films can raise the same questions as philosophy, and this perceptive book illuminates philosophical questions raised with the help of thirteen contemporary and classical films. Memory, the nature of personal identity, the nature of persons, the problem of evil, psychological egoism, the difference between having a morality and having a sound morality, the value of autonomy, just punishment, and the "why be moral?," are some of the questions of life issues that are elucidated on here through such films as "Schindler's List," "Pulp Fiction," "Ghandi," "The Cider House Rules," and "Pleasantville."

Philosophy Through Film

Philosophy Through Film

Philosophy Through Film

Some of the world’s best-loved films can be used as springboards for examining enduring philosophical questions. Philosophy Through Film provides guidance in how to watch films with an eye for their philosophical content, helping students become familiar with key topics in all of the major areas in Western philosophy, and helping them master the techniques of philosophical argumentation. The perfect size and scope for a first course in philosophy, Philosophy Through Film assumes no prior knowledge of philosophy. It is an excellent teaching resource and learning tool, introducing students to key topics and figures in philosophy through thematic chapters, each of which is linked to one or more "focus films" that illustrate a philosophical problem or topic. Revised and expanded, the Second Edition features a new chapter on political philosophy, an introductory chapter explaining how to watch films philosophically, an appendix with primary readings, and the addition of five new focus films. Films examined in depth include: The Matrix Vanilla Sky Hilary and Jackie Memento I, Robot Minority Report Crimes and Misdemeanors Antz Equilibrium The Seventh Seal The Rapture Leaving Las Vegas

Philosophy Through Fiction and Film

Philosophy Through Fiction and Film

Philosophy Through Fiction and Film

For Introduction to Philosophy courses or for courses in Humanities and Philosophy in/and/of Literature. Philosophy Through Fiction and Film offers a fresh approach to philosophy using literary and film narratives along with standard philosophic works to introduce students to the basic branches of the field. The fiction and film enliven the philosophic issues, tapping into today's cultural experience, and the philosophic works ground the issues, showing their deeper significance. At the same time, the fundamental issues of philosophy are covered to provide a complete introduction to the field.

Thinking Through Film

Thinking Through Film

Thinking Through Film

An introduction to philosophy through film, Thinking Through Film: Doing Philosophy, Watching Movies combines the exploration of fundamental philosophical issues with the experience of viewing films, and provides an engaging reading experience for undergraduate students, philosophy enthusiasts and film buffs alike. An in-depth yet accessible introduction to the philosophical issues raised by films, film spectatorship and film-making Provides 12 self-contained, close discussions of individual films from across genres Films discussed include Total Recall, Minority Report, La Promesse, Funny Games, Ikuru, The Dark Knight, Memento, AI and more Explores concepts that span epistemology, metaphysics, fate, choice, robot love, time travel, personal identity, spectacle, ethics, luck, regret, consequentialism, deontology and the philosophy of film itself A uniquely flexible resource for courses in philosophy and film that encourages student reflection, as well as being an engaging read for the film enthusiast

Philosophy Goes to the Movies

Philosophy Goes to the Movies

Philosophy Goes to the Movies

Drawing on a wide range of films from around the world, and the ideas of a diverse selection of thinkers from Plato and Descartes to Marcuse and Foucault, Philosophy Goes to the Movies introduces and discusses central areas of philosophical concern, including: *the theory of knowledge *the self and personal identity *ethics *social and political philosophy *critical thinking Ideal for beginners, this book guides the reader through philosophy using lively and illuminating cinematic examples including A Clockwork Orange, Mulholland Drive, Blade Runner, Modern Times, Wings of Desire and The Lord of the Rings. This fully revised and updated second edition features an expanded introduction providing guidance on teaching and discussing philosophy through film, as well as new material on notable philosophers such as Rousseau, Aquinas and Nietzche, and discussion of a wide range of recent films.

Film Philosophy and Reality

Film  Philosophy  and Reality

Film Philosophy and Reality

Film, Philosophy, and Reality: Ancient Greece to Godard is an original contribution to film-philosophy that shows how thinking about movies can lead us into a richer appreciation and understanding of both reality and the nature of human experience. Focused on the question of the relationship between how things seem to us and how they really are, it is at once an introduction to philosophy through film and an introduction to film through philosophy. The book is divided into three parts. The first is an introduction to philosophy and film, designed for the reader with little background in one or the other subject. The second examines the philosophical importance of the distinction between appearance and reality, and shows that reflection upon this distinction is naturally provoked by the experience of watching movies. The final part takes a close and careful look at the style and techniques of Jean-Luc Godard’s groundbreaking film Breathless in order to illustrate how such themes can be explored cinematically. The book addresses topics such as: Film: what it is and how to understand it The methods and concerns of philosophy The nature of cinematic appearances The history of metaphysics The relationship between cinema and life The philosophical relevance of film techniques. With a glossary of key thinkers, terms, and concepts, as well as sections on suggested films and further reading, this textbook will appeal to lecturers and students in undergraduate philosophy and film courses, and in courses focused on Philosophy of Film, Philosophy and Film, or Film-Philosophy.