Marsyas

Marsyas

Marsyas


Research on mother tongue education in a comparative international perspective

Research on mother tongue education in a comparative international perspective

Research on mother tongue education in a comparative international perspective

Pioneering in the comparison of standard language teaching in Europe, the International Mother tongue Education Network (IMEN) in the last twenty-five years stimulated experts from more than fifteen European countries to participate in a range of research projects in this field of qualitative educational analyses. The volume “Research on mother tongue education in a comparative international perspective – Theoretical and methodological issues” documents theoretical principals and methodological developments that during the last decades shaped IMEN research and may enlarge the fundaments of comparative qualitative research in language education in a seminal way. The topics of this volume include: • IMEN’s aims, points of departure, history and methodology; • research on the professional practical knowledge of MTE-teachers; • innovation, key incident analysis and international triangulation; • positioning in theory and practice. Also included: the IMEN bibliography 1984-2004 which supplies a complete picture of IMEN research activities from the beginning.

Ut Pictura Meditatio

Ut Pictura Meditatio

Ut Pictura Meditatio

Ut pictura meditatio: The Meditative Image in Northern Art, 1500 -1700 examines the form, function, and meaning of pictorial images produced and/or circulated in the Low Countries, Germany, and northern France as templates for the meditative life and its spiritual exercises. Our epigraph - ut pictura meditatio (as is a picture, so is meditation) - connotes the ways in which pictures facilitated meditative prayer and, conversely, the extent to which such prayer was experienced visually. Our essayists are prominent scholars in the fields of art history, history, literary studies, philosophy, and religious studies, all of whom study the ways in which visual images served to structure the interior religious life of laity and clergy in the early modern period. The volume asks how and why images were used not only to initiate, sustain, and structure kinds and degrees of meditative and contemplative devotion, but also to figure the soul's cognitive operations, its negotiation between states of being, between interior and exterior sense, between corporeal and spiritual sight. Implicit in this questioning are further explorations of the nature and scope of the interplay among mental, visual, and verbal images, and the subject positions such images allowed the votary to represent and inhabit. These questions touch upon issues of identity, subjectivity, and figuration that should be of interest to historians of art, literature, religion, and society.

Oud Holland

Oud Holland

Oud Holland


Learned Love

Learned Love

Learned Love

Emblem books, which feature combinations of images and text with a moral lesson for the reader, grew out of the Renaissance and were most popular in the Netherlands. Enigmatic, erudite, and often pious, Dutch love emblems synthesized the traditions of European visual and literary arts—and in turn influenced architecture, painting, poetry, and interior design for centuries to come. Learned Love offers an introduction to this enthralling genre and celebrates the completion of Emblem Project Utrecht, an undertaking that digitized twenty-five of the most representative emblem books. This unprecedented volume explores the delicate network of visual motifs and textual mottos that characterize Dutch love emblems. Learned Love demonstrates how emblem books form a web of closely interrelated references, which the contributors liken to the Internet, and traces the cutting-edge digitization project from inception to finish. This book will interest anyone intrigued by the fruitful gray areas between image and text, scholarship and technology.