Pilate and Jesus

Pilate and Jesus

Pilate and Jesus

Pontius Pilate is one of the most enigmatic figures in Christian theology. The only non-Christian to be named in the Nicene Creed, he is presented as a cruel colonial overseer in secular accounts, as a conflicted judge convinced of Jesus's innocence in the Gospels, and as either a pious Christian or a virtual demon in later Christian writings. This book takes Pilate's role in the trial of Jesus as a starting point for investigating the function of legal judgment in Western society and the ways that such judgment requires us to adjudicate the competing claims of the eternal and the historical. Coming just as Agamben is bringing his decades-long Homo Sacer project to an end, Pilate and Jesus sheds considerable light on what is at stake in that series as a whole. At the same time, it stands on its own, perhaps more than any of the author's recent works. It thus serves as a perfect starting place for readers who are curious about Agamben's approach but do not know where to begin.

Killing Jesus Pilate s Report

Killing Jesus   Pilate s Report

Killing Jesus Pilate s Report

Pontius Pilate's report to Caesar on the killing of Jesus at the hands of the Sanhedrin; as found in Vatican and Eastern Roman Empire libraries. The story of the crucifixion from the first hand view of the Roman Procurator of Judea. His interactions with Christ, the background of Judean hatred of Jesus, and their maneuvering of Pilate into being an accessory in the killing of Jesus. The Passion and Death of Jesus were prophesied centuries before the event as part of the salvation narrative to redeem man. The texts and annotations from the REAL Douay Rheims Bible, dating from St. Jerome's translation of the Bible into Latin in the late 4th Century A.D. gives us God's insight into the horrific killing of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. Containing important historical and biographical information on the principal players in the killing, including Caiaphas' report justifying his own actions, and ultimately recognizing that he may have put the Messiah to death.

Pontius Pilate

Pontius Pilate

Pontius Pilate

If you thought you knew all there is to know about Pontius Pilate and Jesus, this little book has some surprises for you. In this "greatest story never told," Pontius Pilate finally gets a chance to tell his side of the story, filling in what the Bible left out. For someone who made one of the most momentous decisions of all time, we know almost nothing about him. Who was this man who sentenced Jesus to death? What went through his mind as he weighed the alternatives? Was he a villain or a victim of circumstance? If we can imagine Pilate as our contemporary, what would we have done in his place? Written by one of France's great men of letters of the twentieth century, Pontius Pilate is a highly provocative and psychologically gripping novel that reconstructs Pilate's state of mind in deciding to convict Jesus. Taking his place alongside the authors of other such "sacred fantasies" as Nikos Kazantzakis (The Last Temptation of Christ) and Dan Brown (The Da Vinci Code), the surrealist Roger Caillois conjures countless plausible dramas of the "what ifs" that might have played out inside Pilate's mind during the final twenty-four hours before he decided Jesus's fate. Transgressive, disconcerting, and original, Pontius Pilate provides a fascinating opportunity to contemplate the mind of a man who, with one decision, arguably changed the course of human history. It explores the interplay of politics and conscience, fundamentalism and cosmopolitanism, and fanaticism and pragmatism--themes even more compelling today than they were forty-some years ago when the book was originally published. With an introduction by the religion scholar Ivan Strenski, this new American edition of Charles Lam Markmann's original English translation (published in 1963 and long since out of print) makes available once again for the English-language reading public a remarkable work of intelligence, wit, and imagination. Pontius Pilate offers an engaging and climactic read for anyone interested in the interplay of religion and culture and in the mysteries of this pinnacle moment in the biblical narrative.

The Innocence of Pontius Pilate

The Innocence of Pontius Pilate

The Innocence of Pontius Pilate

The gospels and the first-century historians agree: Jesus was sentenced to death by Pontius Pilate, the Roman imperial prefect in Jerusalem. To this day, Christians of all churches confess that Jesus died 'under Pontius Pilate'. But what exactly does that mean? Within decades of Jesus' death, Christians began suggesting that it was the Judaean authorities who had crucified Jesus--a notion later echoed in the Qur'an. In the third century, one philosopher raised the notion that, although Pilate had condemned Jesus, he'd done so justly; this idea survives in one of the main strands of modern New Testament criticism. So what is the truth of the matter? And what is the history of that truth? David Lloyd Dusenbury reveals Pilate's 'innocence' as not only a neglected theological question, but a recurring theme in the history of European political thought. He argues that Jesus' interrogation by Pilate, and Augustine of Hippo's North African sermon on that trial, led to the concept of secularity and the logic of tolerance emerging in early modern Europe. Without the Roman trial of Jesus, and the arguments over Pilate's innocence, the history of empire--from the first century to the twenty- first--would have been radically different.

Come Follow Me

Come  Follow Me

Come Follow Me

When two Roman soldiers are relieved of their watch on Sunday morning, they are as surprised as the oncoming watch to find they have been standing in front of an open and empty tomb, the rock rolled back... and unaware when that might have happened! Yet this is just one more crisis for Pontius Pilate, wracked by guilt over his dishonorable act, and puzzled by the political intrigues and mysterious forces that made his actions inevitable. But there is more to follow for him, much more!

Memoirs of Pontius Pilate

Memoirs of Pontius Pilate

Memoirs of Pontius Pilate

It's been 30 years since he sentenced the troublemaker to die, but Pontius Pilate can't get Jesus off his mind. He sets out to uncover all he can--the truth about his birth, boyhood, ministry, and the struggles that led to his crucifixion. In this vibrant novel Mills has created a new gospel with fresh insight about Jesus' time on Earth.

Gesta Pilati

Gesta Pilati

Gesta Pilati


Pontius Pilate

Pontius Pilate

Pontius Pilate

Pontius Pilate examines the portraits of this Roman governor found in the Gospels. Unlike some discussions of Pilate, this one takes Pilate's role as governor and representative of Roman imperial power seriously. It views Pilate predominantly as a strong, efficient, and astute governor, not as a weak and indecisive man, pressured into killing Jesus against Pilate's convictions. The conclusion considers some of the ethical and theological issues the scenes involving Pilate raise for contemporary readers. Chapters are "Would the Real Pilate Please Stand Up?" "Reading the Gospel Accounts of Pilate," "Governors and the Roman Imperial System," "Mark's Pilate," "Matthew's Pilate," "Luke's Pilate," and "John's Pilate." Receive From Earth's Creation to John's Revelation FREE with the purchase of two or more Interfaces volumes. Mention this offer in the comment section of the order form when placing your order or call 1.800.858.5450. Warren Carter, Ph.D., is professor of New Testament at Saint Paul School of Theology, Kansas City, Missouri. He has published numerous scholarly and ecclesial publications.

Pontius Pilate Deciphering a Memory

Pontius Pilate  Deciphering a Memory

Pontius Pilate Deciphering a Memory

A world-renowned classicist presents a groundbreaking biography of the man who sent Jesus of Nazareth to the Cross. The Roman prefect Pontius Pilate has been cloaked in rumor and myth since the first century, but what do we actually know of the man who condemned Jesus of Nazareth to the Cross? In this breakthrough, revisionist biography of one of the Bible’s most controversial figures, Italian classicist Aldo Schiavone explains what might have happened in that brief meeting between the governor and Jesus, and why the Gospels—and history itself—have made Pilate a figure of immense ambiguity. Pontius Pilate lived during a turning point in both religious and Roman history. Though little is known of the his life before the Passion, two first-century intellectuals—Flavius Josephus and Philo of Alexandria—chronicled significant moments in Pilate’s rule in Judaea, which shaped the principal elements that have come to define him. By carefully dissecting the complex politics of the Roman governor’s Jewish critics, Schiavone suggests concerns and sensitivities among the people that may have informed their widely influential claims, especially as the beginnings of Christianity neared. Against this historical backdrop, Schiavone offers a dramatic reexamination of Pilate and Jesus’s moment of contact, indicating what was likely said between them and identifying lines of dialogue in the Gospels that are arguably fictive. Teasing out subtle but significant contradictions in details, Schiavone shows how certain gestures and utterances have had inestimable consequences over the years. What emerges is a humanizing portrait of Pilate that reveals how he reacted in the face of an almost impossible dilemma: on one hand wishing to spare Jesus’s life and on the other hoping to satisfy the Jewish priests who demanded his execution. Simultaneously exploring Jesus’s own thought process, the author reaches a stunning conclusion—one that has never previously been argued—about Pilate’s intuitions regarding Jesus. While we know almost nothing about what came before or after, for a few hours on the eve of the Passover Pilate deliberated over a fate that would spark an entirely new religion and lift up a weary prisoner forever as the Son of God. Groundbreaking in its analysis and evocative in its narrative exposition, Pontius Pilate is an absorbing portrait of a man who has been relegated to the borders of history and legend for over two thousand years.

The Men Who Condemned Jesus Christ Pilate Caiaphas and Herod in Profile

The Men Who Condemned Jesus Christ  Pilate  Caiaphas and Herod in Profile

The Men Who Condemned Jesus Christ Pilate Caiaphas and Herod in Profile

Nobody knows the names of the soldiers who nailed Jesus to the Cross, but the Gospels and other sources tell us that Pontius Pilate, Joseph Caiaphas and Herod Antipas each had a hand in condemning Jesus Christ to the long walk to Calvary. This volume brings together the complete contents of three books previously published by Simon Webb, profiling these remarkable and very different men.