Portland in the 1960s

Portland in the 1960s

Portland in the 1960s

In 1968, Newsweek reported an imminent threat of twenty thousand hippies descending on Portland, Oregon. Although the numbers were exaggerated, Portland did boast a vibrant 1960s culture of disenchanted and disenfranchised individuals seeking social and political revolution. Barefoot and bell-bottomed, they hung out in Portland's bohemian underground and devised a better world. What began in coffee shop conversations found its voice in the Willamette Bridge newspaper, KBOO radio station and the Portland State University student strike, resulting in social, artistic and political change in the Rose City. Through these stories from the counterculture, author Polina Olsen brings to life the beat-snapping Caffe Espresso, the incense and black light posters of the Psychedelic Supermarket and the spontaneous concerts and communal soups in Lair Park.

The Rotarian

The Rotarian

The Rotarian

Established in 1911, The Rotarian is the official magazine of Rotary International and is circulated worldwide. Each issue contains feature articles, columns, and departments about, or of interest to, Rotarians. Seventeen Nobel Prize winners and 19 Pulitzer Prize winners – from Mahatma Ghandi to Kurt Vonnegut Jr. – have written for the magazine.

Greater Portland

Greater Portland

Greater Portland

Selected by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2001 It has been called one of the nation's most livable regions, ranked among the best managed cities in America, hailed as a top spot to work, and favored as a great place to do business, enjoy the arts, pursue outdoor recreation, and make one's home. Indeed, years of cooperative urban planning between developers and those interested in ecology and habitability have transformed Portland from a provincial western city into an exemplary American metropolis. Its thriving downtown, its strong neighborhoods, and its pioneering efforts at local management have brought a steady procession of journalists, scholars, and civic leaders to investigate the "Portland style" that values dialogue and consensus, treats politics as a civic duty, and assumes that it is possible to work toward public good. Probing behind the press clippings, acclaimed urban historian Carl Abbott examines the character of contemporary Portland—its people, politics, and public life—and the region's history and geography in order to discover how Portland has achieved its reputation as one of the most progressive and livable cities in the United States and to determine whether typical pressures of urban growth are pushing Portland back toward the national norm. In Greater Portland, Abbott argues that the city cannot be understood without reference to its place. Its rivers, hills, and broader regional setting have shaped the economy and the cityscape. Portlanders are Oregonians, Northwesteners, Cascadians; they value their city as much for where it is as for what it is, and this powerful sense of place nurtures a distinctive civic culture. Tracing the ways in which Portlanders have talked and thought about their city, Abbott reveals the tensions between their diverse visions of the future and plans for development. Most citizens of Portland desire a balance between continuity and change, one that supports urban progress but actively monitors its effects on the region's expansive green space and on the community's culture. This strong civic participation in city planning and politics is what gives greater Portland its unique character, a positive setting for class integration, neighborhood revitalization, and civic values. The result, Abbott confirms, is a region whose unique initiatives remain a model of American urban planning.

101 Portland Moons

101 Portland Moons

101 Portland Moons

A verse journal telling the story of the moon, the seasons, the changes in a landscape & in a life over the course of a year. The poems, which are loosely based on Classical Chinese forms, tell not only an exterior story, but also a story of internal shifting & transformation; they tell not only the story of the landscape's details, but what those details reveal.

Portland

Portland

Portland


An Architectural Guidebook to Portland

An Architectural Guidebook to Portland

An Architectural Guidebook to Portland

Portland, Oregon, is a city widely known for its civic planning, preservation and inviting atmosphere. Within the five-mile downtown district can be found skyscrapers, cast-iron front buildings, a riverfront park, old brick warehouses, breweries and more. Photos.

Frommer s Seattle Portland 2000

Frommer s Seattle   Portland 2000

Frommer s Seattle Portland 2000

Life is short. Vacations are shorter. Relax! Trust your trip to Frommer's. Choose the Only Guide That Gives You: Exact prices, so you can plan the perfect trip no matter what your budget. The latest, most reliable information—completely updated every year! Lots of easy-to-read color maps. The widest and best selection of hotels and restaurants in every price range, with candid, in-depth reviews. All the practical details you need to make the most of your time and money. One-of-a-kind experiences and undiscovered gems, plus a new take on all the top attractions. Outspoken opinions on what's worth your time and what's not. A fresh, personal approach that puts the fun and excitement back into travel! It's a Whole New World with Frommer's. Find us online at www.frommers.com