Poverty to Paradise

Poverty to Paradise

Poverty to Paradise

Poverty to Paradise, by Rocky Mason is a story of courage, fear, deprivation and humour. There are times when you will laugh out loud and others when you will weep. It's the definitive autobiography of a man who has been there, done that and still proudly wears the T Shirt. It's an eventful life of tough childhood wartime experiences, a successful amateur boxing career of 69 straight wins in 87 fights only to move from "Gumshield to Greasepaint" and a life in showbiz working for the "Holiday Camp King," Billy Butlin. Drawing on a multitude of sources Rocky offers a compelling account of those six gruelling years 1939 - 45. Food shortages, conscientious objectors, head lice, visits of the nit-nurse, rationing, nightly air raids and his own personal experience of evacuation to an atrocious boys camp. During what was a 30 year association with Butlins, Rocky became a personal friend of almost every showbiz star in the country, many of whom have contributed to this book. .

Poverty in Paradise

Poverty in Paradise

Poverty in Paradise

"A 2002-2003 Housing Income and Expenditure survey showed that 34.4% of Fiji's population lived below the poverty line. An estimated 12.5 % are living in over 180 squatter settlements around the country. This booklet presents some case studies of real people living in these squatter settlements along with stories from those working with families in squatter settlements over a number of years." --Publisher.

Dividing Paradise

Dividing Paradise

Dividing Paradise

How rural areas have become uneven proving grounds for the American Dream Late-stage capitalism is trying to remake rural America in its own image, and the resistance is telling. Small-town economies that have traditionally been based on logging, mining, farming, and ranching now increasingly rely on tourism, second-home ownership, and retirement migration. In Dividing Paradise, Jennifer Sherman tells the story of Paradise Valley, Washington, a rural community where amenity-driven economic growth has resulted in a new social landscape of inequality and privilege, with deep fault lines between old-timers and newcomers. In this complicated cultural reality, "class blindness" allows privileged newcomers to ignore or justify their impact on these towns, papering over the sentiments of anger, loss, and disempowerment of longtime locals. Based on in-depth interviews with individuals on both sides of the divide, this book explores the causes and repercussions of the stark inequity that has become commonplace across the United States. It exposes the mechanisms by which inequality flourishes and by which Americans have come to believe that disparity is acceptable and deserved. Sherman, who is known for her work on rural America, presents here a powerful case study of the ever-growing tensions between those who can and those who cannot achieve their visions of the American dream.

Paradise Lost

Paradise Lost

Paradise Lost