The State Literacy and Popular Education in Chile 1964 1990

The State  Literacy  and Popular Education in Chile  1964 1990

The State Literacy and Popular Education in Chile 1964 1990

The popular education and adult literacy movements in Chile have historically represented competing paths toward a literate society: one born and nurtured through bitter nineteenth-century labor struggles, the other a compensatory effort by the modern state to limit the political potential of literacy. Robert Austin's book explores the contest between the state and popular education in three paradigmatic Latin American regimes: that of Eduardo Frei Montalva (Christian Democrat, 1964-70), Salvador Allende (Socialist, 1970-73) and Augusto Pinochet (Dictator, 1973-90). Robert Austin's engaging narrative captures the relationship between the Chilean state, formal and non-formal literacy, and popular education, from the demise of liberal capitalism to the consolidation of neoliberalism. This remarkable investigation of the dynamic link between the historical process, literacy, and pedagogy celebrates popular education's victory in securing the inclusion, and subsequent empowerment, of women and ethnic minorities. The State, Literacy, and Popular Education in Chile, 1964-1990 will be of great interest to political scientists, cultural historians, and scholars of education.

Panama

Panama

Panama


Sumario Actual de Revistas

Sumario Actual de Revistas

Sumario Actual de Revistas


Recomendaci n relativa al desarrollo de la educaci n de adultos aprobada por la Conferencia general en su decimonovena reuni n

Recomendaci  n relativa al desarrollo de la educaci  n de adultos aprobada por la Conferencia general en su decimonovena reuni  n

Recomendaci n relativa al desarrollo de la educaci n de adultos aprobada por la Conferencia general en su decimonovena reuni n

Comprises ten sections with detailed lists of values on themes such as (1) adult education must be seen as integral to a global scheme for life-long education and learning; (2) adult education should promote work for peace, international understanding, and cooperation; (3) adult education activities should meet needs for development, community participation, and individual self-fulfillment; (4) adult education methods should take into account incentives and obstacles to adult participation and learning; (5) member states should endeavor to establish a network to meet adult education needs; (6) adult educators should be carefully recruited and should receive initial and inservice training; (7) young people's education should progressively be oriented towards life-long education and learning; (8) in formulating adult education curriculum, programs, and activities, adults' work experiences should be taken into account; (9) at all levels, structures should be set up for consultation/coordination among public authorities competent in adult education; and (10) member states should strengthen bilateral or multilateral cooperation to promote adult education development, improve content and methods, and find new educational strategies.