S 989 the End Racial Profiling Act of 2001

S  989  the End Racial Profiling Act of 2001

S 989 the End Racial Profiling Act of 2001


Racial Profiling in Canada

Racial Profiling in Canada

Racial Profiling in Canada

Informed by a wealth of research and theoretical approaches from a wide range of disciplines, Racial Profiling in Canada makes a major contribution to the literature and debates on a topic of growing concern.

Racial Profiling

Racial Profiling

Racial Profiling

In recent years, racial profiling has drawn the attention of state and federal governments. In this book, racial profiling is defined as the practice of targeting individuals for police or security interdiction, detention, or other disparate treatment based primarily on their race, ethnicity, or national origin in the belief that certain minority groups are more likely to engage in unlawful behaviour. Assertions that law enforcement personnel at all levels unfairly target certain racial and ethnic groups, particularly but not exclusively for traffic stops and searches, have raised concerns about violations of the Constitution. The major debate on racial profiling centres on whether the practice should be prohibited entirely and whether data on traffic stops and searches should be collected to determine if the practice is occurring. This book gathers presents the major issues, available data, and analyses important to understanding on the most dangerous and divisive practices of our time.

Racial Profiling and Borders

Racial Profiling and Borders

Racial Profiling and Borders

Racial profiling and border security have become characteristic features of governance in Western liberal democracies during the twenty-first century. This new collection provides an important multi-national perspective on an issue of great and growing concern, particularly but not exclusively in the context of corporate globalization and neo-liberal governance. Despite the growing significance of regimes of racial profiling, surveillance and tightened border controls in the post-9/11 period, there have been very few extended analyses of racial profiling in different eras and contexts, particularly at borders. The work examines the issue from a transborder perspective, with comparisons, connections and intersections of policy and practice. Chapters examine a range of topics including racial profiling and implications for inter/national and human security, racial profiling along borders in the US and the construction of "terrorists" and "illegal aliens," racial profiling and problems of proof and movements opposing racial profiling, among others. Overall, the chapters in this collection reframe racial profiling as a human rights rather than civil rights issue, making an important contribution to analyses of this important topic. About the editor: Jeff Shantz teaches critical theory, elite deviance, community and human rights in the Department of Criminology at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Metro Vancouver, Canada. He is the author of the book Living Anarchy: Theory and Practice in Anarchist Movements. His writings have appeared in leading international journals including Critical Sociology, Critique of Anthropology, Feminist Review and New Politics as well as numerous anthologies. A longtime community organizer, he has been a member of the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty and host of the weekly "Anti-Poverty Report" on radio stations CHRY and CKLN in Toronto, Canada. Dr. Shantz received his Ph.D. from York University in Toronto.

Racial Profiling

Racial Profiling

Racial Profiling

Sociologist Glover examines racial profiling as an element used to usher men of color into a justice system that is racially ordered in many aspects. While this is a logical way to frame the issue and a solid foundation for an examination of profiling the author provides a deeper perspective by questioning methods used to collect criminological data, develop theoretical foundations, and teach about crime and social control. The study of criminology tends to focus on formal stages, such as sentencing and parole. In contrast institutionalized racism is more active, often in subtle ways, during informal stages, Glover's research examines these informal processes and their impacts on the people targeted by the system.

Racial Profiling

Racial Profiling

Racial Profiling

In the United States, racial profiling affects thousands of Americans every day. Both individuals and institutions—such as law enforcement agencies, government bodies, and schools—routinely use race or ethnicity as grounds for suspecting someone of an offense. The high-profile deaths of unarmed people of color at the hands of police officers have brought renewed national attention to racial profiling and have inspired grassroots activism from groups such as Black Lives Matter. Combining rigorous research with powerful personal stories, this insightful title explores the history, the many manifestations, and the consequences of this form of social injustice.

The Crisis

The Crisis

The Crisis

The Crisis, founded by W.E.B. Du Bois as the official publication of the NAACP, is a journal of civil rights, history, politics, and culture and seeks to educate and challenge its readers about issues that continue to plague African Americans and other communities of color. For nearly 100 years, The Crisis has been the magazine of opinion and thought leaders, decision makers, peacemakers and justice seekers. It has chronicled, informed, educated, entertained and, in many instances, set the economic, political and social agenda for our nation and its multi-ethnic citizens.