Representing and Intervening

Representing and Intervening

Representing and Intervening

A lively and clearly written introduction to the philosophy of natural science, organized around the central theme of scientific realism.

The Emergence of Probability

The Emergence of Probability

The Emergence of Probability

Historical records show that there was no real concept of probability in Europe before the mid-seventeenth century, although the use of dice and other randomizing objects was commonplace. First published in 1975, this edition includes an introduction that contextualizes his book in light of developing philosophical trends.

Rewriting the Soul

Rewriting the Soul

Rewriting the Soul

As Foucault once identified a politics that centers on the body and another that classifies and organizes the human population, Hacking has now provided a masterful description of the politics of memory: the scientizing of the soul and the wounds it can receive.

The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism

The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism

The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism

In The Tenets of Cognitive Existentialism, Dimitri Ginev draws on devel-opments in hermeneutic phenomenology and other programs in hermeneutic philosophy to inform an interpretative approach to scientific practices. At stake is the question of whether it is possible to integrate forms of reflection upon the ontological difference in the cognitive structure of scientific research. A positive answer would have implied a proof that (pace Heidegger) “science is able to think.” This book is an extended version of such a proof. Against those who claim that modern science is doomed to be exclusively committed to the nexus of objectivism and instrumental rationality, the interpretative theory of scientific practices reveals science’s potentiality of hermeneutic self-reflection. Scientific research that takes into consideration the ontological difference has resources to enter into a dialogue with Nature. Ginev offers a critique of postmodern tendencies in the philosophy of science, and sets out arguments for a feminist hermeneutics of scientific research.

Science Key Concepts in Philosophy

Science  Key Concepts in Philosophy

Science Key Concepts in Philosophy

A great text for students wishing to examine the questions raised in the philosophy of science. An ideal first guide to this challenging subject.

Hasok Chang s Active Scientific Realism in the Context of Realist Scientific Paradigms

Hasok Chang   s Active Scientific Realism in the Context of Realist Scientific Paradigms

Hasok Chang s Active Scientific Realism in the Context of Realist Scientific Paradigms

Seminar paper from the year 2013 in the subject Philosophy - Philosophy of the Present, grade: 1.0, University of Vienna (Institut für Philosophie), course: Seminar Pluralismus und Wissenschaftsphilosophie, language: English, abstract: In his recent book, Is Water H2O?, Hasok Chang presents a detailed analysis of scientific realism and enunciates a new concept of it, which he names “active scientific realism”. It is a view of scientific realism that accentuates experimental activity for learning about reality rather than armchair philosophy in the search for utmost metaphysical truth. Chang puts it in a nutshell as follows: “If the buzzword for standard realism is truth, it is progress for active realism.” (Chang 2012, 223) This term paper attempts to critically look at this new concept, put it in the perspective of other realist concepts and find answers to questions like the following: • How does Chang’s concept fit into the existing landscape of scientific realism? • What are the roots of the concept? • What is new and attractive in it? • What are the weaknesses of the concept? First I’ll try to define scientific realism as a metaphysical and epistemological position as opposed to anti-realism. In the next chapter I’ll present the main arguments for and against scientific realism, the “no miracle” argument and the “pessimistic meta induction”, and also look at them from Hasok Chang’s angle of view. Then a brief overview of common realist positions in philosophy of science will be given, including Hasok Chang’s new conception. In the following chapter I’ll try to look critically at some aspects of Chang’s “Active Scientific Realism” and balance the strengths and weaknesses of the concept.

Philosophy of Science Key Concepts

Philosophy of Science  Key Concepts

Philosophy of Science Key Concepts

Science has made a huge impact on human society over hundred years, but how does it work? How do scientists do the things they do? How do they come up with the theories? How do they test them? How do they use these theories to explain phenomena? How do they draw conclusions from them about how the world might be? Now updated, this second edition of Philosophy of Science: Key Concepts looks at each of these questions and more. Taking in turn the fundamental theories, processes and views lying at the heart of the philosophy of science, this engaging introduction illuminates the scientific practice and provides a better appreciation of how science actually works. It features: - Chapters on discovery, evidence, verification and falsification, realism and objectivity - Accessible overviews of work of key thinkers such as Galileo, Einstein and Mullis - A new chapter on explanation - An extended range of easy-to-follow and contemporary examples to help explain more technical ideas - Study exercises, an annotated bibliography and suggestions of Where to Go Next Succinct and approachable, Philosophy of Science: Key Concepts outlines some of the most central and important scientific questions, problems and arguments without assuming prior knowledge of philosophy. This enjoyable introduction is the perfect starting point for anyone looking to understand how and why science has shaped and changed our view of the world.