Schooling Without Labels

Schooling Without Labels

Schooling Without Labels

Douglas Biklen closely examines the experiences of six families in which children with disabilities are full participants in family life in order to understand how people who have been labeled disabled might become full participants in the other areas of society as well. He focuses on the contradictions between what some families have achieved, what they want for their children, and what society and its social policies allow. He demonstrates how the principles of inclusion that govern the lives of these families can be extended to education, community life, and other social institutions. The parents who tell their stories here have actively sought inclusion of their children in regular schools and community settings; several have children with severe or multiple disabilities. In discussing issues such as normalization, acceptance, complete schooling, circles of friends, and community integration, these parents describe the challenge and necessity of their children's "leading regular lives." In the series Health, Society, and Policy, edited by Sheryl Ruzek and Irving Kenneth Zola.

Foundations of Inclusive Education Research

Foundations of Inclusive Education Research

Foundations of Inclusive Education Research

This volume focuses on inquiry into inclusive education from the perspective of scholarly influences in the field of practice and research.

Handbook of Research on Educational Leadership for Equity and Diversity

Handbook of Research on Educational Leadership for Equity and Diversity

Handbook of Research on Educational Leadership for Equity and Diversity

The rapid growth of diversity within U.S. schooling and the heightened attention to the lack of equity in student achievement, school completion, and postsecondary attendance has made equity and diversity two of the principle issues in education, educational leadership, and educational leadership research. The Handbook of Research on Educational Leadership for Equity and Diversity is the first research-based handbook that comprehensively addresses the broad diversity in U.S. schools by race, ethnicity, culture, language, gender, disability, sexual identity, and class. The Handbook both highly values the critically important strengths and assets that diversity brings to the United States and its schools, yet at the same time candidly critiques the destructive deficit thinking, biases, and prejudices that undermine school success for many groups of students. Well-known chapter authors explore diversity and related inequities in schools and the achievement problems these issues present to school leaders. Each chapter reviews theoretical and empirical evidence of these inequities and provides research-based recommendations for practice and for future research. Celebrating the broad diversity in U.S. schools, the Handbook of Research on Educational Leadership for Equity and Diversity critiques the inequities connected to that diversity, and provides evidence-based practices to promote student success for all children.

For children who Vary from the Normal Type

For  children who Vary from the Normal Type

For children who Vary from the Normal Type

For "Children Who Vary from the Normal Type" identifies four main rationales for these programs: the need to isolate children whose behavior or background elicited fear and/or contempt among school and civic authorities; the need to ensure efficiency in the administration of the schools; the need to facilitate the operation of individual classrooms; and the desire to provide a specialized pedagogy to individual children identified as requiring one. Each program is examined in depth, including the overlap, interplay, and friction within the dynamic matrix of needs, fears, hopes, and opportunities that spurred its creation."--Jacket.

The Forgotten Dream of American Public Education

The Forgotten Dream of American Public Education

The Forgotten Dream of American Public Education

Based on observation and experience, analysis translates into a proposal for reform. Eight essays explore in personal terms several troubling educational issues undergirded by the fundamental belief that the purpose of public education is the cultivation of civic virtue. The first essay addresses the widespread loss of faith in public schooling. In the second essay, qualities are described that students are encouraged to develop through their experience of schooling. In addition, these qualities are discussed in relationship to the qualities that are needed for society to become more compassionate. A critique of commonplace assumptions that underpin the commitment to sorting and labeling comprises the third essay's topic. Questioning the assumptions that standarized tests perpetuate constitutes essay 4. Essay 5 describes current practices and issues in teacher education. Essay 6 presents an analysis of the type and quality of school knowledge and describes the promising directions for improvement. Conditions necessary for the development of creativity in the public schools is the focus of essay 7. In the concluding essay, some of the metaphors used by Americans as they ponder the issues of public education are analyzed. In addition, an alternative metaphor--"school and community"--is offered as a means for thinking about public education and the public world. (JAM)