The Yorkshire Ripper

The Yorkshire Ripper

The Yorkshire Ripper

THE YORKSHIRE RIPPER: Britain's Most Notorious Serial Killer: Crimes of Pure Evil Not since the crimes of Jack the Ripper in 1888 has a British murderer made such a lasting impact on the world. The Yorkshire Ripper holds one of the highest body counts in recent memory; 13 murders and a string of other attacks which would later yield additional deaths and tragedy. The frequency at which Peter Sutcliffe mercilessly took lives is something which few modern serial killers will ever surpass. What makes Peter Sutcliffe a figure of terror is the fact that he is simply a working class everyman, but one who harboured a violent compulsion he was unable to control. The fact that the Yorkshire Ripper evaded capture for six years, despite being at the forefront of investigations, is a testament to his ability to hide in plain sight. It is Peter Sutcliffe's banality which adds an additional layer of fear to an already terrifying character. The Yorkshire Ripper: Britain's Most Notorious Serial Killer is part of the Crimes of Pure Evil Series, which looks at the dark truth of some of the world's most horrific serial murderers. "An uncomfortable but fascinating read" "A must-read book for anyone interested in criminal psychology" "A portrait of pure evil..."

Serial Killer Peter Sutcliffe

Serial Killer Peter Sutcliffe

Serial Killer Peter Sutcliffe

The Yorkshire Ripper was- is- perhaps the most famous British serial killer, aside from his Victorian namesake. His crimes gripped the nation over a five year period, starting in 1975. But behind the media image created for him was a man called Peter Sutcliffe, a normal man from the accounts of all who knew him. He first worked as a gravedigger, before moving on to regular jobs as a salesman, a factory worker, and finally an HGV driver. Nothing out of the ordinary. Sutcliffe's story is one of inept policing, media frenzy and unrelenting brutality- and insanity. When initially apprehended, Sutcliffe claimed that he had been ordered to murder prostitutes by no less an authority than God himself. Because of his string of crimes, Sutcliffe has been imprisoned for almost the entirety of his adult life. He has no chance of ever being released.

Serial Killers Around the World

Serial Killers Around the World

Serial Killers Around the World

Serial Killers Around the World: The Global Dimensions of Serial Murder compiles serial murder case studies from several countries - from Australia to Great Britain, and from Japan to Pakistan. The author has covered accounts on a wide array of serial killers including some well known felons namely Jack the Ripper, The Butcher of Mons, Martin & Marie Dumollard, as well as some of the lesser known serial slayers such as Daisy DeMelker, Yoshio Kodaira, Javed Iqbal and many more. The book highlights six dimensions of each case: the killer(s), the serial murders, other crimes, communication, the investigation and trial and punishment of the accused. Readers, both general and aspiring criminologists alike, will find Serial Killers Around the World an interesting resource for critical information on serial murders committed in nations around the world.

The Deadly Streets of Yorkshire

The Deadly Streets of Yorkshire

The Deadly Streets of Yorkshire

Read about Peter Sutcliffe A.K.A The Yorkshire Ripper, and how his reign of terror quietened the street of Leeds and Bradford in the late 1970s. On the 2nd of January, 1981, Britain breathed a sigh a relief when a killer who had taken the life of over 13 women was apprehended at Melbourne Avenue by two policemen. The killer had escaped identification and arrest for over five years, and his capture was a relief for women of Yorkshire. His name was Peter Sutcliffe and the press were calling him 'The Yorkshire Ripper", whose brutal modus operandi involved attacking helpless ladies with a hammer before stabbing them to death with a screwdriver and dismembering their body. During his reign of terror, the streets of Yorkshire become quieter with the stories of murder women who had fallen prey to this serial killer. In the dark lurked this psychopathic figure called 'The Yorkshire Ripper". Britons quaked at the mention of this serial killer who terrified the nation with his hammer and screwdriver. This smart psychopath seemed to derive a lot of pleasure from watching women die painful deaths. He seemed to enjoy every moment of their torture. Described as a ruthless and cold-hearted killer, investigators confirmed that the murderer enjoyed going out at night and killing just for the thrill of it. And by the time he was captured by the police, Peter Sutcliffe had arguably become one of Britain's most prolific serial killer. His apprehension brought an end to a manhunt that literally shock Britain and some neighboring countries. For the period he remained elusive, Sutcliffe remained a thorn in the flesh of detectives at West Yorkshire Police. They knew when could attack next and his moves were largely unpredictable. The Northern part of England was soaked in the horror and gloomy stories of the killer at night - The Yorkshire Ripper. Here is the story of Peter Sutcliffe.

Just A Boy

Just A Boy

Just A Boy

One October night in 1975 Richard, aged five, was alone in the house with his three sisters. It was 3am and their mother hadn't come home yet. Next morning, the police arrived to take the children away. Their mother had become the first victim of a serial killer soon to become known as the 'Yorkshire Ripper'. Passed from one violent home to another, the children were forgotten by all except the press. As the salacious headlines multiplied, Richard and his sisters were never able to recover from their mother's murder. Whilst Richard tried to handle the terror of his violent upbringing, his sister struggled to deal with memories of sexual abuse. Without love or support they spiralled away from help or happiness. Then one day Richard McCann, having reached suicidal rock bottom, decided no one was going to rescue their lives but him. It was the beginning of an inspirational transformation. Now he is able to tell the story of how the forgotten children of violence suffer, and how they can heal. A heartbreaking, uplifting story of survival and hope.

Revisiting the Yorkshire Ripper Murders

Revisiting the Yorkshire Ripper Murders

Revisiting the Yorkshire Ripper Murders

Between 1975 and 1980, Peter Sutcliffe, who became known as the Yorkshire Ripper, murdered 13 women in the North of England. The murders provoked widespread fear amongst women and impacted the public consciousness at both the local and national level. This book revisits the case, applying a feminist and cultural criminological lens to explore a range of criminological concerns relating to gender, violence and victimhood. Combining research findings from oral history interviews, analysis of popular criminological texts and academic commentary, this volume explores what the case can tell us about feminism, fear of crime, gender and serial murder and the representation of victims and sex workers. The volume contributes to a creative cultural criminology, highlighting how excavating recent criminal history and reading across texts presents new ways for understanding violence, gender and representation in the contemporary context.

Crimes Against Sex Workers

Crimes Against Sex Workers

Crimes Against Sex Workers

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 56. Chapters: Jack the Ripper, Robert Pickton, Ipswich serial murders, Whitechapel murders, Peter Sutcliffe, Gary Ridgway, Grim Sleeper, William Henry Hance, Bobbie Joe Long, Arthur Shawcross, Thomas Neill Cream, Joel Rifkin, Steve Wright, Robert Lee Yates, James Randall, Jack the Stripper, Donato Bilancia, Albert Tirrell, West Mesa murders, Bradford murders, Jack Unterweger, Lawrence Singleton, Bandali Debs, Helen Jewett, Teresa Carr Deni, Doug Clark, Carol M. Bundy, International Day to End Violence Against Sex Workers, Long Island serial killer, Dayton Leroy Rogers, Robert Shulman, Fritz Honka, Maury Travis, Mark Rowntree, Scott Williams. Excerpt: "Jack the Ripper" is the best-known name given to an unidentified serial killer who was active in the largely impoverished areas in and around the Whitechapel district of London in 1888. The name originated in a letter, written by someone claiming to be the murderer, that was disseminated in the media. The letter is widely believed to have been a hoax, and may have been written by a journalist in a deliberate attempt to heighten interest in the story. Other nicknames used for the killer at the time were "The Whitechapel Murderer" and "Leather Apron." Attacks ascribed to the Ripper typically involved female prostitutes from the slums whose throats were cut prior to abdominal mutilations. The removal of internal organs from at least three of the victims led to proposals that their killer possessed anatomical or surgical knowledge. Rumours that the murders were connected intensified in September and October 1888, and letters from a writer or writers purporting to be the murderer were received by media outlets and Scotland Yard. The "From Hell" letter, received by George Lusk of the Whitechapel Vigilance Committee, included half of a preserved human kidney, supposedly from one of the...

Yorkshire Ripper The Secret Murders

Yorkshire Ripper   The Secret Murders

Yorkshire Ripper The Secret Murders

In 1981, Peter Sutcliffe, the 'Yorkshire Ripper', was convicted of thirteen murders and seven attempted murders. All his proven victims were women: most were prostitutes.Astonishingly, however, this is not the whole truth. There is a still-secret story of how Sutcliffe's terrible reign of terror claimed at least twenty-two more lives and left five other victims with terrible injuries. These crimes - attacks on men as well as women - took place all over England, not just in his known killing fields of Yorkshire and Lancashire.Police and prosecution authorities have long known that Sutcliffe's reign of terror was far longer and far more widespread than the public has been led to believe. But the evidence has been locked away in the files and archives, ensuring that these murders and attempted murders remain unsolved today.As a result, the families of at least twenty-two murdered women have been cheated of their right to know how and why their loved ones died: the pain of living with that may diminish over time, but it never fades away completely. Five other victims survived his attacks: their plight, too, has never been officially acknowledged.Worse still, police blunders and subsequent suppression of evidence ensured that three entirely innocent men were imprisoned for murders committed by the Yorkshire Ripper. They each lost the best parts of their adult lives, locked up and forgotten in stinking cells for more than two decades.This book, by a former police Intelligence Officer, is the story not just of those long-cold killings, of the forgotten families and of three terrible miscarriages of justice. It also uncovers Peter Sutcliffe's real motive for murder - and reveals how he manipulated police, prosecutors and psychiatrists to ensure that he serves his sentence in the comfort of a psychiatric hospital rather than a prison cell.

Facing the Yorkshire Ripper

Facing the Yorkshire Ripper

Facing the Yorkshire Ripper

As a survivor of a brutal attack by the Yorkshire Ripper, this book gives fresh insight into the consequences of being labeled a victim of this notorious serial killer. Mo Lea was followed home and attacked by Peter Sutcliffe, who hit her over the head repeatedly with a hammer. She was stabbed with a screwdriver leaving her with life threatening injuries. The book reveals how Mo has wrestled with the past, struggling to come to terms with the well-trodden, morbid narrative. She has written a new, fresh perspective for the present day. Her writing offers an alternative account, one which repositions her as a survivor with a success story. While sympathy has its place for the victims, this book gives insight into processes of recovery and success. Mo had no control over unwanted media interventions. Sometimes the Ripper story would appear on the morning news while she was getting ready to go to work. She learnt to contain her anxiety but she could neither predict or escape these uncomfortable moments that reminded her of her past trauma. Mo Lea’s art practice has been an important factor in her life. She has been fortunate to use this as an outlet to explore her pain, anger, suffering and recovery. After years of personal growth and recovery, a short film was made of Mo Lea creating a drawing from the iconic photograph of the man who had tried to take her life. She is filmed ripping up the Ripper. She is filmed tearing up the portrait that she had so carefully drawn, rendering him as disposable as a piece of litter. The film shows how Mo turned her story around, making Sutcliffe the victim and herself, the triumphant survivor. Mo had finally found a way of stepping out of the frame. She no longer felt Iike running away. The illustrations contained within describe better than any words, her journey from tragic despair to calmness and acceptance. By writing this book Mo Lea has found a way to reclaim her story.

Serial Killers and the Phenomenon of Serial Murder

Serial Killers and the Phenomenon of Serial Murder

Serial Killers and the Phenomenon of Serial Murder

A superbly targeted resource for those learning about serial killings. Serial Killers and the Phenomenon of Serial Murder examines and analyses some of the best known (as well as lesser) cases from English criminal history, ancient and modern. It looks at the lifestyles, backgrounds and activities of those who become serial killers and identifies clear categories of individuals into which most serial killers fall. Led by Professor David Wilson the authors are all experts and teachers concerning the ever-intriguing subject of serial killing: why, when and how it happens and whether it can be predicted. Taking some of the leading cases from English law and abroad they demonstrate the patterns that emerge in the lives and backgrounds of those who kill a number of times over a period. The book is designed for those studying the topic at advanced level, whether as an academic discipline on one of the many courses now run by universities and colleges or as a private quest for understanding. It contains notes on key terms and explanations of topics such as co-activation, Munchausen syndrome, cooling-off period, psychopathy checklist, social construction, case linkage, family annihilation, activity space, rational choice theory, medicalisation and rendezvous discipline. As the first textbook of its kind it will be an invaluable resource for teachers and students of serious crime.