Splits in the Soul

Splits in the Soul

Splits in the Soul

Psycotherapy. The impact of trauma across generations.

Death

Death

Death

Examines the myriad of questions that arise when confronting the meaning of mortality, challenging many widely-held views about death and inviting readers to take a fresh look at the fact that they will die.

Drawing the Soul

Drawing the Soul

Drawing the Soul

This book presents essays that consider the status and significance of the 'pictures of the mind', in Freud, and also in the work of the major psychoanalytic thinkers. It offers an unparalleled chance to compare and contrast the fundamental ideas and assumptions of key figures in psychoanalysis.

The Resounding Soul

The Resounding Soul

The Resounding Soul

It is surely not coincidental that the term 'soul' should mean not only the centre of a creature's life and consciousness, but also a thing or action characterised by intense vivacity ('that bike's got soul!'). It also seems far from coincidental that the same contemporary academic discussions that have largely cast aside the language of 'soul' in their quest to define the character of human mental life should themselves be so bloodless, or so lacking in soul. The Resounding Soul arises from the opposite premise: that the task of understanding human nature is bound up with the more critical task of learning to be fully human. The papers collected here are derived from a conference in Oxford sponsored by the Centre of Theology and Philosophy and explore the often surprising landscape that emerges when human consciousness is approached from this angle. Drawing upon literary, philosophical, theological, historical, and musical modes of analysis, these essays remind the reader of the power of the ancient language of soul over against contemporary impulses to reduce, fragment, and overly determine human selfhood.

Calling in the Soul

Calling in the Soul

Calling in the Soul

"A gold mine of information for American social scientists. It is a 'must have.'" -Choice "Calling in the Soul" (Hu Plig) is the chant the Hmong use to guide the soul of a newborn baby into its body on the third day after birth. Based on extensive original research conducted in the late 1980s in a village in northern Thailand, this ethnographic study examines Hmong cosmological beliefs about the cycle of life as expressed in practices surrounding birth, marriage, and death, and the gender relationships evident in these practices. The social framework of the Hmong (or Miao, as they are called in China, and Meo, in Thailand), who have lived on the fringes of powerful Southeast Asian states for centuries, is distinctly patrilineal, granting little direct power to women. Yet within the limits of this structure, Hmong women wield considerable influence in the spiritually critical realms of birth and death. Patricia Symonds situates her study within the landscape of northern Thai mountain life and anthropological perspectives on the Hmong, and then focuses on "Flower Village," telling detailed stories of births, marriages, and deaths. Recurring motifs emerge: the complementarity of women's and men's roles in daily life and in the otherworld, and their reversal at critical moments; the importance of the brother-sister relationship; the social and spiritual significance of the ceremonial clothing women create, especially their embroidered "flower cloth" and the ambiguously nuanced sev, or "modesty aprons," they wear; the endlessly cyclical nature of life, from birth to death to birth again; the importance of sound and silence at times of transition; the complex connections between the land of the living and the land of the dead. Hmong women's primary source of power in the patriline is their fecundity, through which they influence key spiritual aspects of the life cycle. This value and power is evident in the division of bride-price into two parts: "milk and care money," which compensates a woman's parents for her upbringing; and payment for the "birth shirt," or placenta, of the child the young wife will produce. Through provision of birth shirts for fetuses and of elaborately embroidered cloth shirts for the dead, women literally clothe the soul through cycles of rebirth. An epilogue and appendixes provide a discussion of the impact of HIV/AIDS on the Hmong of Thailand, cultural factors in HIV transmission, and strategies for containment; complete Hmong texts and English translations of "Calling in the Soul," and "Showing the Way," the chant which guides the soul of the deceased through the land of darkness and back to reincarnation in a new body in the land of light; Flower Village demographic information; and an account of a shamanic healing and outline of Hmong health care issues in the United States. Calling in the Soulwill be of interest to sociocultural anthropologists, medical anthropologists, Southeast Asianists, and gender specialists. Patricia V. Symondsis adjunct associate professor of anthropology at Brown University. She is the coauthor (with Brooke G. Schoepf) ofHIV/AIDS: The Global Pandemic and Struggles for Control. "Despite the now quite substantial literature on the Hmong, until now, there has been very little that explores gender issues. . . .Calling in the Soulalso makes a substantial contribution to our knowledge about Hmong death rites and religious beliefs." - Charles Keyes, University of Washington "The volume's strength is its ethnography, . . . in the numerous engaging accounts of particular events - marriages, births, etc." - Nicola Tannebaum, Lehigh University "A fascinating ethnography. Its firm grounding in an ethnic minority village in Thailand provides an interesting setting for thinking about the life cycle." - Hjorleifur Jonsson, Arizona State University

Crystal Prescriptions

Crystal Prescriptions

Crystal Prescriptions

This practical sixth book in the Crystal Prescriptions series covers crystals for karmic clearing, soul integration and healing the family tree. In addition to our own karma, we are hampered by ancestral memories, attitudes and beliefs that are not necessarily ours. Fortunately, some extraordinary new crystals have appeared which help us to quickly and easily break lineages and clear our ‘junk DNA’, without having to relive the trauma of karmic history. With the assistance of these crystals, and some old favourites, it is possible to heal far back into the genealogical line and our own karmic past. The healing is then projected forward into the future so that generations to come can have the benefit of garnered soul and ancestral wisdom, but without the baggage.

Chicken Soup for the Soul All in the Family

Chicken Soup for the Soul  All in the Family

Chicken Soup for the Soul All in the Family

Readers will be amused, comforted, and encouraged, by stories about “dysfunctional” families just like their own, and will realize we are all alike and we all have the same family issues. A great quirky and fun holiday book. Almost everyone thinks their own family is “dysfunctional “or at least has a dysfunctional member or two. With stories about wacky yet lovable relatives, holiday meltdowns, and funny foibles along with more serious stories about abuse, controlling family members, and flare-ups, Chicken Soup for the Soul: All in the Family shows readers that they aren’t alone.

Anatomy of Spirituality Portrait of the Soul

Anatomy of Spirituality  Portrait of the Soul

Anatomy of Spirituality Portrait of the Soul

The domain of spirituality, separated from its theological overburden, believes in the existence of a spiritual self, presumed to be distinctly separate from the psychological self. The spiritual eternal self, also known as the soul or spirit (sometimes supported by an overarching Spirit), is asserted to be operating behind the ephemeral self. This book takes a contrarian stance; it argues that the premise of the soul concept is obtained through the magic of language, maintained through the marvel of the brain’s biochemistry, and sustained through the mirage of the psychological juggernauts of the brain. The magic, the marvel and the mirage, together, bring about subtle shifts as the linguistic brain suppresses many psychological details, habitually applies mental templates such as inversions and dichotomies, and enhances its language by coining religious and spiritual metaphors. The consequence of these changes is that the usual flickering self begins to be impressed by itself, believing it is buttressed by something transcendental and eternal within: the soul or the spirit. The self, although indoctrinated during its formative years, also begins to assimilate and accept the opinion that the overwhelming weight of religious doctrines and dogmas, the overburden, signifies as the legitimate proof for the eternal soul.

A Brief History of the Soul

A Brief History of the Soul

A Brief History of the Soul

This book is a clear and concise history of the soul in western philosophy, from Plato to cutting-edge contemporary work in philosophy of mind. Packed with arguments for and against a range of different, historically significant philosophies of the soul Addresses the essential issues, including mind-body interaction, the causal closure of the physical world, and the philosophical implications of the brain sciences for the soul's existence Includes coverage of theories from key figures, such as Plato, Aquinas, Locke, Hume, and Descartes Unique in combining the history of ideas and the development of a powerful case for a non-reductionist, non-materialist account of the soul