Sustainable Lina

Sustainable Lina

Sustainable Lina

This essential book unravels the link between regional cultures, adaptive reuse of existing buildings and sustainability. It concentrates on the social dimensions relating to Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi’s late adaptive reuse projects and works from the 1960s to the early 1990s, interpreting her themes, technical sources and design strategies of the creation of luxury as sustainability.The edited book charts how Lina Bo Bardi “invented” her own version of sustainability, introduced this concept through her landscape and adaptive reuse designs and through ideas about cross-cultures in Brazil. The book offers a critical reflection, exploration and demonstration of the importance of adaptive reuse in the landscape and related themes for researchers and provides researchers and students new material on sustainability for further study. In the context of the plurality of revisions of Lina Bo Bardi’s work, this book brings about a refreshed interpretation of her integrative approach to adaptive reuse of buildings and landscapes as a significant contribution to the sustainability debate. It offers new insights into the construction of discourses about sustainability from the perspective of one of the key architects in the period to operate in the interface between modernity and tradition. – Dr Fabiano Lemes de Oliveira, Senior Lecturer, University of Portsmouth (UK) Adaptability is one of the most important words in sustainable architecture today. From this perspective, this book looks at the work of a master of Brazilian modernism with lessons to be learnt on how to qualify indoor and outdoor spaces in social, environmental and architectural terms. Adaptive strategies as those seen throughout the work of Bo Bardi are key instrument/tools/concept to sustainable buildings and cities. − Professor Joana Carla Soares Goncalves, FAU, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil) The year 2015 marked the centenary of Lina Bo Bardi. This book is looking at Bardi's work through the perspective of adaptive reuse. Bringing together specialists on sustainability with specialists of Lina's work, the book generates an interesting new layer of discussion on the work of an architect that was never shy of controversy. − Associate Professor Fernando Luiz Lara, University of Texas at Austin (USA) This collection of essays makes a very important and engaging contribution to suggest that to take Lina as an inspiration is to deal with her contradictions and to evaluate the stakes of what she struggled with in a 21st century world. What the authors gathered here and have laid out is a very timely invitation to discern “Lessons from Lina” in relationship to today’s pressing issues of architecture and environment, sustainability, recycling, and developing an ethical design position in a world of diminishing resources and escalating challenges. -Prof Barry Bergdoll, Columbia University and MoMA, New York (USA) The book features a Foreword by Barry Bergdoll. Winner of the Curtin University Humanities Research Award 2017 for Best Book of the Year (Oct. 2017). Here the judges’ appraisal: “An elegantly conceptualised and carefully crafted volume that represents the work of the twentieth century Brazilian architect Lina Bo Bardi through the lens of urgent contemporary questions of sustainability, adaptive re-use and ethical design. The book brings together a multidisciplinary and international collection of authors and addresses a global readership. It is beautifully presented and intelligently edited.” (Jury, Book Award 2017) Winner of the Curtin University Humanities Research Award 2017 for Best Chapter of the Year (Sept. 2017): Annette Condello. Chapter 3 “Salvaging the Site’s Luxuriance: Lina Bo Bardi – Landscape Architect.” Here the judges appraisal: “A richly textured investigation of Lina Bo Bardi, a complex, fascinating and important Italian-born Brazilian architect, designer and co-founder of the magazine Habitat. [...] This chapter is a thoughtful and respectful but also critical piece, combining thorough research with deft analysis and carefully selected images, and the publication has been highly recommended by leading academics and curators.” (Jury, Book Award 2017)

Sustainable Luxury Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Sustainable Luxury  Entrepreneurship  and Innovation

Sustainable Luxury Entrepreneurship and Innovation

This book highlights different roles in entrepreneurship and innovation, based on the act of setting up a new venture in the area of sustainable luxury and fashion, which also involves cognitive and motivational characteristics. It also discusses the fact that many sustainability-promoting innovations require substantial technological advances.

Biotechnological Approaches for Sustainable Development

Biotechnological Approaches for Sustainable Development

Biotechnological Approaches for Sustainable Development

Papers presented at the International Conference on Bioconvergence 2004, held at Patiala during 18-20 November 2004.

Urban Regeneration

Urban Regeneration

Urban Regeneration

Urban Regeneration — A Manifesto for transforming UK Cities in the Age of Climate Change explores and offers guidance on the complex process of how to transform cities, continuing the unfinished project of the seminal 1999 text Towards an Urban Renaissance. It is a 21st-century manifesto of urban principles compiled by a prominent urbanist, for the regeneration of UK cities, focusing on the characteristics of a ‘good place’ and the strategies of sustainable urbanism. It asks readers to consider how we can best transform the derelict, abandoned and run-down parts of cities back into places where people want to live, work and play. The book frames an architecture of re-use that translates and combines the complex ‘science of cities’ and the art of urban and architectural design into actionable and practical guidance on how to regenerate cities. Fascinated by the typology and value of the compact UK and European city model, Lehmann introduces the concept of ‘high density without high buildings’ as a solution that will make our cities compact, walkable, mixed-use and vibrant again.

Routledge Handbook of Food in Asia

Routledge Handbook of Food in Asia

Routledge Handbook of Food in Asia

Throwing new light on how colonisation and globalization have affected the food practices of different communities in Asia, the Routledge Handbook of Food in Asia explores the changes and variations in the region’s dishes, meals and ways of eating. By demonstrating the different methodologies and theoretical approaches employed by scholars, the contributions discuss everyday food practices in Asian cultures and provide a fascinating coverage of less common phenomenon, such as the practice of wood eating and the evolution of pufferfish eating in Japan. In doing so, the handbook not only covers a wide geographical area, including Japan, Indonesia, Vietnam, Singapore, India, China, South Korea and Malaysia, but also examines the Asian diasporic communities in Canada, the United States and Australia through five key themes: Food, Identity and Diasporic Communities Food Rites and Rituals Food and the Media Food and Health Food and State Matters. Interdisciplinary in nature, this handbook is a useful reference guide for students and scholars of anthropology, sociology and world history, in addition to food history, cultural studies and Asian studies in general.

Think Thought Think

Think Thought Think

Think Thought Think


The Challenge of Sustainable Cities

The Challenge of Sustainable Cities

The Challenge of Sustainable Cities

This volume by urban planners and architects assesses the current state of play between urban theory, policy and architectural and planning practice in developing countries. It explains and criticises what is happening in cities in an era now dominated by neoliberal development policy, compares and contrasts the various policy and planning approaches, and explores how they are changing the role of architects, planners and other professionals. The contributors focus on the principal issues that exist in urban environmental strategy, the spatial restructuring of cities, and the attempts to foster more participation in urban programmes and management. The originality of thought, the diversity of case material and the specific policy focus make this book an important contribution to the formulation of future urban strategies in the South.

Land scarcity impedes sustainable input intensification in smallholder irrigated agriculture Evidence from Egypt

Land scarcity impedes sustainable input intensification in smallholder irrigated agriculture  Evidence from Egypt

Land scarcity impedes sustainable input intensification in smallholder irrigated agriculture Evidence from Egypt

Increasing population pressure and population density in many African countries are inducing land scarcity and land constraints. These increasing land constraints are expected to trigger various responses and adaptation strategies, including agricultural intensification induced by land scarcity, as postulated by the Boserup hypothesis. However, most empirical evaluations of the Boserup hypothesis come from rainfed agriculture and mostly from Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where application of improved agricultural inputs remains historically low. Agricultural intensification practices as well as the relevance of the Boserup hypothesis in irrigated agriculture and in contexts where application of improved inputs is high remains unexplored. Furthermore, while much of the debate on the topic in Africa has focused on how to boost agricultural intensification, there is scant evidence on whether evolving agricultural intensification practices in some parts of Africa are sustainable, yield-enhancing, and optimal. In this paper we investigate the implication of land scarcity on agricultural intensification and the relevance of the Boserup hypothesis in the context of Egypt, where agriculture is dominated by irrigation and input application rates are much higher than SSA. We also examine whether evolving agricultural intensification practices induced by land scarcity are agronomically appropriate and yield-enhancing. We find that land scarcity induces higher application of agricultural inputs, mainly nitrogen fertilizers, sometimes beyond the level that is agronomically recommended. More importantly, land scarcity increases overapplication of nitrogen fertilizer relative to crop-specific agronomic recommendations. This implies that land constraints remain as important challenges for sustainable agricultural intensification. Finally, we find suggestive evidence that such overapplication of nitrogen fertilizers is not yield-enhancing, but, rather, yield-reducing. We also document that land scarcity impedes mechanization of agriculture. Our findings have important implications to inform appropriate farm management and sustainable intensification practices. Furthermore, our results can inform long-term policy responses to land scarcity.