Terrorism Criminal Law and Politics

Terrorism  Criminal Law and Politics

Terrorism Criminal Law and Politics

Based on author's thesis (doctoral - Helsingin yliopisto, 2018) issued under title: The death of the freedom fighter: how the threat of terrorism is suffocating the protection of political criminals.

Law and Liberty in the War on Terror

Law and Liberty in the War on Terror

Law and Liberty in the War on Terror

How can we ensure national security against people unafraid to kill themselves along with their victims - people who, self-evidently, will not be deterred by traditional laws which punish offenders after their crimes are committed. This is the challenge for liberal democracies such as Australia. New laws specifically designed to forestall terrorist activity have been a key response. Law and Liberty in the War on Terror describes these laws and debates both their effectiveness and impact on civil liberties. International and domestic commentators from the fields of government, law and political science address questions such as: How does the law define 'terrorism'? Can the criminal justice system accommodate preparatory terrorism offences? Is torture ever acceptable as an interrogative method? What is the role of the judiciary in times of emergency? How do Australia's anti-terrorism laws compare with those of the United Kingdom and New Zealand? How are Australian communities and politics affected by responses to terrorism?"[I] n this book, proponents of the new anti-terrorism laws seek to justify their provisions and opponents argue that the laws go too far. These chapters also show the extent of the changes that have been made to our legal and administrative structures. ... The chapters in this book cannot be dismissed as mere academic analyses. They have to do with the lives and aspirations of all Australians. They ask whether Australia is, and whether it will be, a united, secure, free and confident nation." - Sir Gerard Brennan AC KBE, former Chief Justice of Australia

International Terrorism

International Terrorism

International Terrorism

This is the first comprehensive, single-volume collection of terrorism documents. The editor assembled material from both governmental and nongovernmental source relating to the prevention and suppression of terrorism. The collection constitutes a valuable research tool for academics and also for those concerned with implementing instruments to combat terrorism.

Defining Terrorism in International Law

Defining Terrorism in International Law

Defining Terrorism in International Law

Terrorism has never been defined in international law. This book examines the many failed attempts by the international community and the United Nations since the 1920s to define and criminalize terrorism, including heated debates about 'freedom fighters' and 'State terrorism'. It clearly explains why the international community should define and criminalize terrorism, how it should define it, and what it should exclude from the definition of terrorism. In doingso, it explores the difficult legal, ethical and philosophical questions involved in deciding when political violence is, or is not, permissible.

Enforcing International Law Norms Against Terrorism

Enforcing International Law Norms Against Terrorism

Enforcing International Law Norms Against Terrorism

This book, written by leading experts, comprehensively analyses the suitability of existing legal tools to enforce rules prohibiting terrorism.

Global Anti Terrorism Law and Policy

Global Anti Terrorism Law and Policy

Global Anti Terrorism Law and Policy

All indications are that the prevention of terrorism will be one of the major tasks of governments and regional and international organisations for some time to come. In response to the globalised nature of terrorism, anti-terrorism law and policy have become matters of global concern. Anti-terrorism law crosses boundaries between states and between domestic, regional and international law. They also cross traditional disciplinary boundaries between administrative, constitutional, criminal, immigration and military law, and the law of war. This collection is designed to contribute to the growing field of comparative and international studies of anti-terrorism law and policy. A particular feature of this collection is the combination of chapters that focus on a particular country or region in the Americas, Europe, Africa, and Asia, and overarching thematic chapters that take a comparative approach to particular aspects of anti-terrorism law and policy, including international, constitutional, immigration, privacy, maritime, aviation and financial law.

Terrorism Online

Terrorism Online

Terrorism Online

This book investigates the intersection of terrorism, digital technologies and cyberspace. The evolving field of cyber-terrorism research is dominated by single-perspective, technological, political, or sociological texts. In contrast, Terrorism Online uses a multi-disciplinary framework to provide a broader introduction to debates and developments that have largely been conducted in isolation. Drawing together key academics from a range of disciplinary fields, including Computer Science, Engineering, Social Psychology, International Relations, Law and Politics, the volume focuses on three broad themes: 1) how – and why – do terrorists engage with the Internet, digital technologies and cyberspace?; 2) what threat do these various activities pose, and to whom?; 3) how might these activities be prevented, deterred or addressed? Exploring these themes, the book engages with a range of contemporary case studies and different forms of terrorism: from lone-actor terrorists and protest activities associated with ‘hacktivist’ groups to state-based terrorism. Through the book’s engagement with questions of law, politics, technology and beyond, the volume offers a holistic approach to cyberterrorism which provides a unique and invaluable contribution to this subject matter. This book will be of great interest to students of cybersecurity, security studies, terrorism and International Relations.

Terrorism Rights and the Rule of Law

Terrorism  Rights and the Rule of Law

Terrorism Rights and the Rule of Law

The rule of law is becoming a victim of the struggle against terrorism. Many countries are reviewing their security procedures and questioning whether due process rights hinder them in the war on terror. There is increasing emphasis on preventive detention or strategies of disablement that cut into the liberties of suspects who may not have committed a crime. The focus of this book is the Republic of Ireland, where the risk of political violence has constantly threatened the Irish state. To ensure its survival, the state has resorted to emergency laws that weaken due process rights. The effects of counter-terrorism campaigns upon the rule of law governing criminal justice in Ireland are a central feature of this book. Globalization has supported this crossover, as organized crime seems immune to conventional policing tactics. But globalization fragments the authority of the state by introducing a new justice network. New regulatory agencies are entrusted with powers to control novel risks and social movements adopt a human rights discourse to contest state power and emergency laws. The result of this conflux of actors and risks is are negotiation of the model of justice that citizens can expect. Terrorism, Rights and the Rule of Law contributes to current debates about civil liberties in the war on terror, how counter-terrorism can contaminate criminal justice, and how globalization challenges a state-centred view of criminal justice. It will be of key interest to students of criminology, law, human rights and sociology,as well as legal and other practitioners and policy-makers.

Crimes of Terror

Crimes of Terror

Crimes of Terror

The U.S. government's power to categorize individuals as terrorist suspects and therefore ineligible for certain long-standing constitutional protections has expanded exponentially since 9/11, all the while remaining resistant to oversight. Crimes of Terror: The Legal and Political Implications of Federal Terrorism Prosecutions provides a comprehensive and uniquely up-to-date dissection of the government's advantages over suspects in criminal prosecutions of terrorism, which are driven by a preventive mindset that purports to stop plots before they can come to fruition. It establishes the background for these controversial policies and practices and then demonstrates how they have impeded the normal goals of criminal prosecution, even in light of a competing military tribunal model. Proceeding in a linear manner from the investigatory stage of a prosecution on through to sentencing, the book documents the emergence of a "terrorist exceptionalism" to normal rules of criminal law and procedure and questions whether the government has overstated the threat posed by the individuals it charges with these crimes. Included is a discussion of the large-scale spying and use of informants rooted in the questionable "radicalization" theory; the material support statute--the government's chief legal tool in bringing criminal prosecutions; the new rules regarding generation of evidence and the broad construction of that evidence as relevant at trial; and a look at the special sentencing and confinement regimes for those convicted of terrorist crimes. In this critical examination of terrorism prosecutions in federal court, Professor Said reveals a phenomenon at odds with basic constitutional protections for criminal defendants.