The Amazing Life of John Cooper Fitch

The Amazing Life of John Cooper Fitch

The Amazing Life of John Cooper Fitch

"A great read about an incredible man." - Carroll Shelby THE DRAMATIC LIFE OF JOHN FITCH: Won more than 20 sports car races, Friend of JFK and Rose Kennedy, Boyfriend of Kathleen Kennedy, Won first race held in Buenos Aires, Kissed by Race-Queen Evita Peron, Shot down German Jet in his P-51, First SCCA National Racing Champion, Won his class at the 1955 Mille Miglia, Among first pilots in Europe in WWII, Turned Corvettes into real sports cars, Invented freeway safety barriers, Safety innovations that saved 1,000s of lives, Sailed the Gulf looking for German subs, POW liberated by General Patton, Won 1953 12-Hours of Sebring race, Won his class in 1951 Le Mans race, Helped make the movie Racers, Designed Lime Rock race course, Set new speed record at Daytona Beach, Won the Team Prize for GM at Sebring!

World War II Veterans in Motorsports

World War II Veterans in Motorsports

World War II Veterans in Motorsports

"This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny," said President Franklin D. Roosevelt of the young Americans who grew up during the deprivation of the Great Depression and later served during World War II. The 23 described in this book went on from military service to make their mark in auto racing, particularly in the sports car scene of the 1950s and 1960s. Ken Miles and Vasek Polak were not Americans during the war but later went on to become citizens. Carroll Shelby was not only a great driver but also created cars that are still manufactured. John Von Neumann and Vasek Polak were instrumental in helping to establish Porsche as a marque in the U.S. John Fitch, Ed Hugus, Chuck Daigh, Bill Stroppe, Max Balchowsky, Jay Chamberlain, Jim Peterson and Paul Newman were heroes in the war before succeeding in businesses and motorsports.

The Modern Elegiac Temper

The Modern Elegiac Temper

The Modern Elegiac Temper

Lamentation of death is the traditional elegiac focus, but in the twentieth century the elegy has become characterized as well by the mourning of other kinds of loss—those personal, familial, romantic, cultural, and philosophical privations and dispossessions that have so greatly shaped the modern sensibility. According to John B. Vickery, a profound elegiac temper is itself the major trait of twentieth-century culture, registered in attitudes ranging from regret, sorrow, confusion, anger, anxiety, doubt, and alienation to outright despair. He transforms our understanding of the elegy and its relation to modernism in The Modern Elegiac Temper. Vickery offers in-depth readings of a broad sampling of British and American poems written from World War I to the present. He considers works of overlooked poets such as Vernon Watkins, George Barker, and Edith Sitwell while also attending to canonical writers such as T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, W. H. Auden, and Wallace Stevens. Taking a text-oriented rather than author- or theory-oriented approach, he discusses in turn the personal, love, cultural, and philosophical elegy and shows how war, the Great Depression, the Holocaust, and other major historical events influenced poets’ elegiac expressions. By suggesting ways in which the individual-centered concerns of the traditional elegy metamorphose under the depersonalizing lens of high modernism, Vickery reveals the modern elegy to be a finely calibrated instrument for reading and expressing, absorbing and reflecting, the modern temperament.

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Library News

Library News


Books for School Libraries

Books for School Libraries

Books for School Libraries