The Architecture of Innovation

The Architecture of Innovation

The Architecture of Innovation

Find the right innovation model Innovation is a much-used buzzword these days, but when it comes to creating and implementing a new idea, many companies miss the mark—plans backfire, consumer preferences shift, or tried-and-true practices fail to work in a new context. So is innovation just a low-odds crapshoot? In The Architecture of Innovation, Harvard Business School professor Josh Lerner—one of the foremost experts on how innovation works—says innovation can be understood and managed. The key to success? Incentives. Fortunately, new research has shed light on the role incentives can play in promoting new ideas, but these findings have been absent from innovation literature—until now. By using the principles of organizational economics, Lerner explains how companies can set the right incentives and time horizons for investments and create a robust innovation infrastructure in the process. Drawing from years of experience studying and advising companies, venture capital firms, and an assortment of governments around the globe, Lerner looks to corporate labs and start-ups, and argues that the best elements of both can be found in hybrid models for innovation. While doing so, he uses a wide range of industry-rich examples to show how these models work and how you can put them into practice in your own organization. Practical and thought-provoking, The Architecture of Innovation is the missing blueprint for any company looking to strengthen its innovation competence.

The Organization and Architecture of Innovation

The Organization and Architecture of Innovation

The Organization and Architecture of Innovation

Building on his pioneering work on the management of technology and innovation in his first book, Managing the Flow of Technology, Thomas J. Allen of MIT has joined with award-winning German architect Gunter Henn of HENN Architekten to produce a book that explores the combined use of two management tools to make the innovation process most effective: organizational structure and physical space. They present research demonstrating how organizational structure and physical space each affect communication among people—in this case, engineers, scientists, and others in technical organizations—and they illustrate how organizations can transform both to increase the transfer of technical knowledge and maximize the “communication for inspiration” that is central to the innovation process. Allen and Henn illustrate their points with discussions of well-known buildings around the world, including Audi’s corporate headquarters, Steelcase’s corporate design center, and the Corning Glass Becker building, as well as several of Gunter Henn’s own projects, including the Skoda automotive factory in the Czech Republic and the Faculty for Mechanical Engineering at the Technical University of Munich. Allen and Henn then demonstrate the principles developed in their work by discussing in detail one example in which organizational structure and physical space were combined successfully to promote innovation with impressive results: HENN Architekten’s Project House for the BMW Group Research and Innovation Centre in Munich, cited by Business Week (April 24, 2006) in naming BMW one of the world’s most innovative companies. Professor Thomas Allen is the originator of the Allen curve. In the late 1970s, Tom Allen undertook a project to determine how the distance between engineers’ offices coincided with the level of regular technical communication between them. The results of that research, now known as the Allen Curve, revealed a distinct correlation between distance and frequency of communication (i.e. the more distance there is between people — 50 meters or more to be exact — the less they will communicate). This principle has been incorporated into forward-thinking commercial design ever since, in, for example, The Decker Engineering Building in New York, the Steelcase Corporate Development Center in Michigan, and BMW’s Research Center in Germany.

Integrating Innovation in Architecture

Integrating Innovation in Architecture

Integrating Innovation in Architecture

Today’s design professionals are faced with challenges on all fronts. They need not only to keep in step with rapid technological changes and the current revolution in design and construction processes, but to lead the industry. This means actively seeking to innovate through design research, raising the bar in building performance and adopting advanced technologies in their practice. In a constant drive to improve design processes and services, how is it possible to implement innovations? And, moreover, to assimilate them in such a way that design, methods and technologies remain fully integrated? Focusing on innovations in architecture, this book covers new materials and design methods, advances in computational design practices, innovations in building technologies and construction techniques, and the integration of research with design. Moreover, it discusses strategies for integrating innovation into design practices, risks and economic impacts. Through numerous case studies, it illustrates how innovations have been implemented on actual architectural projects, and how design and technical innovations are used to improve building performance, as well as design practices in cutting-edge architectural and engineering firms. Projects of all scales and building types are discussed in the book, ranging from small-scale installations, academic and commercial buildings to large-scale mixed-use, healthcare, civic, academic, scientific research and sports facilities. Work from design firms around the globe and of various scales is discussed in the book, including for example Asymptote Architecture, cepezed, CO Architects, Consarc Architects, FAAB Architektura, Gerber Architekten, HOK, IDOM-ACXT, MAD Architects, Morphosis Architects, SDA | Synthesis Design + Architecture, Studiotrope, Perkins+Will, Richter Dahl Rocha & Associés, Snøhetta, Rob Ley Studio, Trahan Architects, UNStudio and Zaha Hadid Architects, among many others.

Anticipate

Anticipate

Anticipate

This is a book about innovation. Innovation, the process of monetizing a novel idea, is the secret to new product success. And the key driver of innovation is creative thinking. The author uses his early training in major advertising agencies, and his later experience as CEO of technology startups, to present a unique ?architecture? for empowering small technical teams with the tools and techniques they need to develop breakthrough products.

Innovation in Architecture

Innovation in Architecture

Innovation in Architecture

In this highly original book, through a series of essays, key architects and engineers in Europe, Australia, and the USA describe the ideas and development behind the innovative technology in their chosen projects, with the emphasis being on the means of production and the links between design and the manufacturing process.

Procuring Innovative Architecture

Procuring Innovative Architecture

Procuring Innovative Architecture

The case studies in this book describe how clients’ promotion of innovative communities of practice has led to important collections of architectural works. The book provides an assessment of the effectiveness of their approaches. Architects and clients will understand what to look for as they construct their careers and their portfolios with innovation as a goal. It is taken for granted nowadays that supporting innovative architecture benefits society. In countries as diverse as Austria, Australia, Belgium, England, Japan, South East Asia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland and the USA, retailers, institutions, local and regional government and transport authorities have established substantial bodies of work by new and emerging architects. This books looks at what their goals are and how they have achieved them. Is it possible to promote sustainable communities of innovative practice through such patronage? Can innovation be ‘kick-started’ by importing visionary works?

Architecture Mobility

Architecture   Mobility

Architecture Mobility

This publication focuses on the delicate relationship between the city and mobility through the works of some of the most important contemporary international architects such as Jean Nouvel, OMA, Massimiliano Fuksas, and Alessandro Mendini; the book also deals with how thinking and experiencing the urban car is changing.

Innovations in Hospital Architecture

Innovations in Hospital Architecture

Innovations in Hospital Architecture

Verderber considers the future of the hospital, and supplies a compendium of 100 planning and design considerations for the building type. The book includes 28 case studies of built and unbuilt hospitals from around the world. These are grouped into five types -autonomous community: based hospitals, children's hospitals, rehabilitation and elderly care centres and hospitals, regional medical centre campuses, and visionary (unbuilt) projects. --

Modular product architecture Fostering or hindering innovation

Modular product architecture   Fostering or hindering innovation

Modular product architecture Fostering or hindering innovation

Seminar paper from the year 2007 in the subject Business economics - Supply, Production, Logistics, grade: 2,0, LMU Munich (Innotec - Institut für Innovationsforschung, Technologiemanagement und Entrepreneurship), course: Innovationsmanagement: "Theorie – Empirie – Case Studies“ , 34 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: Industrialization processes in the last decades have resulted in the emergence of immense new industries, which for a great part can be ascribed to comprehensive activities of technological innovation. Driven by dynamic market contexts such as globalization or technological advances leading to growing complexities and evolving consumer demands, firms are however increasingly affronted with the challenge to offer a greater variety of products of improved performance in less time and under lower costs (Momme et al. 2000, p.128; Ulrich/Eppinger 1995, p.5). Technological innovation as the means and ends of new product development therefore plays a significant role. Modular product architecture -with products that made up of a set of independent components, connected only via defined interfaces (Ulrich/Eppinger 1995, p.132)- is predominantly found in technologically intensive industries such as telecommunications, electronics or the automobile sector (Sanchez/Mahoney 1996, p.67; Staudenmayer et al 2005, p.308). Under the light of the challenges affronting firms, this paper examines the effects, modular product architecture has on technological innovation. This paper investigates the effects of modular product architecture with standardized open interfaces assuming many component producers and a central firm controlling the systemic fit of these. From a resource and production point of view, modularity in combination with a coherent process infrastructure enables firms to meet market demands described (Sanchez 2004, p.59). In addition, product-strategic flexibility is significantly improved involving the possibilities of mass-customization through flexible up- & downscaling. The setting described leads to an “outsourcing” of innovation activity to component producers, pursuing autonomous trial & error innovation and to consumers, independently performing mix & match innovation. Furthermore, this may induce changes on the architectural level of products (Baldwin/Clark 1997, p.85; Cusumano/Gawer 2002, p.55). The paper further suggests that technological innovation with modularity applied, leads to a steady evolution of products (Galvin/Morkel 2001, p.34; Langlois/Robertson 1992, p.310). The resulting changes can show sustaining (Christensen 1997, p. xv) character, but equally may disrupt existing knowledge in the event of integrative innovation. The X-Box case powerfully demonstrates key aspects of product modularity and its effects on technological innovation.