The City and the Architecture of Change

The City and the Architecture of Change

The City and the Architecture of Change

Presenting a broad selection of projects covering a twenty-fi ve-year period, this book provides an overview of cedric Price s work for the fi rst time."

The Architecture of Paris

The Architecture of Paris

The Architecture of Paris

Over 300 buildings of the last 2000 years are presented.

The Architecture of New York City

The Architecture of New York City

The Architecture of New York City

From the reviews of the first edition of Architecture of New York City… "It should provide joy to anyone even vaguely interested in this city and its artifacts.… It is very likely to turn them into enthusiasts." —New York Times Book Review "…weaves the little-known stories of 80 buildings and landmarks into a colorful tapestry of New York’s whirlwind history.… This richly illustrated guide can be read from beginning to end with great pleasure." —Publishers Weekly "…Reynolds takes a new look at the older glories of New York. The architecture is freshly seen and is clearly researched. Reynolds’ splendid photographs present highly original views of familiar (and not so familiar) important structures and sites." —Adolph Placzek, former president of the Society of Architectural Historians The history of New York City is a rich pageant of culture, commerce, social change, and human drama stretching back five hundred years. And when we know where to look for it, it is all there for us to see, vividly etched into the cityscape. Now in this celebration of New York’s architecture, Donald Martin Reynolds helps us to see and appreciate, as never before, the city’s monuments and masterpieces, and to hear the tales they have to tell. With the help of nearly 200 striking photographs (20 of them new to this edition), Dr. Reynolds takes us on an unforgettable tour of five centuries of architectural change and innovation—from 16th-century Dutch canals and 18th-century farmhouses, to the elevator buildings of the 1870s (precursors of skyscrapers) and the Art Deco, Bauhaus, and Post-modern buildings that make up New York City’s celebrated skyline. Floor by floor stone by stone, detail by detail Dr. Reynolds lovingly describes 90 of the city’s most striking buildings, bridges, parks, and places. He tells us when, why, and how they were built and who built them, and in the process, he evokes the illustrious and exciting history of this restless, ceaselessly seductive metropolis.

Boundaries of the City

Boundaries of the City

Boundaries of the City

At the same time, contrary instincts aspire to create a unified domain, to proclaim the interdependence of things through constructed work. Cities are shaped less by rational design than by a recurring dialectic of boundary formation

The Architecture of Community

The Architecture of Community

The Architecture of Community

Leon Krier is one of the best-known—and most provocative—architects and urban theoreticians in the world. Until now, however, his ideas have circulated mostly among a professional audience of architects, city planners, and academics. In The Architecture of Community, Krier has reconsidered and expanded writing from his 1998 book Architecture: Choice or Fate. Here he refines and updates his thinking on the making of sustainable, humane, and attractive villages, towns, and cities. The book includes drawings, diagrams, and photographs of his built works, which have not been widely seen until now. With three new chapters, The Architecture of Community provides a contemporary road map for designing or completing today’s fragmented communities. Illustrated throughout with Krier’s original drawings, The Architecture of Community explains his theories on classical and vernacular urbanism and architecture, while providing practical design guidelines for creating livable towns. The book contains descriptions and images of the author’s built and unbuilt projects, including the Krier House and Tower in Seaside, Florida, as well as the town of Poundbury in England. Commissioned by the Prince of Wales in 1988, Krier’s design for Poundbury in Dorset has become a reference model for ecological planning and building that can meet contemporary needs.

Aldo Rossi

Aldo Rossi

Aldo Rossi


The Architecture of Rome

The Architecture of Rome

The Architecture of Rome

Architects and artists have always acknowledged over the centuries that Rome is rightly called the 'eternal city'. Rome is eternal above all because it was always young, always 'in its prime'. Here the buildings that defined the West appeared over more than 2000 years, here the history of European architecture was written. The foundations were laid even in ancient Roman times, when the first attempts were made to design interiors and thus make space open to experience as something physical. And at that time the Roman architects also started to develop building types that are still valid today, thus creating the cornerstone of later Western architecture. In it Rome's primacy remained unbroken -- whether it was with old St Peter's as the first medieval basilica or new St. Peter's as the building in which Bramante and Michelangelo developed the High Renaissance, or with works by Bernini and Borromini whose rich and lucid spatial forms were to shape Baroque as far as Vienna, Bohemia and Lower Franconia, and also with Modern buildings, of which there are many unexpected pearls to be found in Rome. All this is comprehensible only if it is presented historically, i. e. in chronological sequence, and so the guide has not been arranged topographically as usual but chronologically.This means that one is not led in random sequence from a Baroque building to an ancient or a modern one, but the historical development is followed successively. Every epoch is preceded by an introduction that identifies its key features. This produces a continuous, lavishly illustrated history of the architecture of Rome -- and thus at the same time of the whole of the West. Practical handling is guaranteed by an alphabetical index and detailed maps, whose information does not just immediately illustrate the historical picture, but also makes it possible to choose a personal route through history.

The Architecture of Oppression

The Architecture of Oppression

The Architecture of Oppression

This book re-evaluates the architectural history of Nazi Germany and looks at the development of the forced-labour concentration camp system. Through an analysis of such major Nazi building projects as the Nuremberg Party Rally Grounds and the rebuilding of Berlin, Jaskot ties together the development of the German building economy, state architectural goals and the rise of the SS as a political and economic force. As a result, The Architecture of Oppression contributes to our understanding of the conjunction of culture and politics in the Nazi period as well as the agency of architects and SS administrators in enabling this process.

The Architecture of Jefferson Country

The Architecture of Jefferson Country

The Architecture of Jefferson Country

The great architectural significance of Albemarle County and Charlottesville, Virginia, rests, not surprisingly, on the continuing influence of Thomas Jefferson. Not only did Jefferson design the State Capitol in Richmond, his home Monticello, his country retreat Poplar Forest, and the University of Virginia; after his death, master builders continued to construct important examples of Jeffersonian classicism in Albemarle County and beyond. But what is less well known are the many important examples of other architectural idioms built in this Piedmont Virginia county, many by nationally renowned architects. At the turn of the twentieth century, the renewed interest of wealthy clients in eclectic architectural styles attracted some of the finest Beaux Arts architects in the country to the Charlottesville area. Grand new buildings complemented and competed with the Jeffersonian models of a hundred years earlier. In addition, throughout its history Albemarle County has seen construction of a great variety of public architectural landmarks: mills and churches, movie theaters and hospitals, gas stations and taverns. For many years K. Edward Lay has been teaching, guiding tours of, and writing about this rich architectural legacy. Here at last is his definitive treatment of a topic that has been his life's work, presented in an elegantly illustrated volume. Following a general introduction by John S. Salmon, Lay divides his book into six chronological chapters: "The Georgian Period," "Thomas Jefferson and His Builders," "The Roman Revival (1800-1830)," "The Greek Revival (1830-1860)," "Beyond the Classical Revival," and "The Eclectic Era (1890-1939)." He discusses over 800 buildings, from a Sears house to grand estates, the Abell-Gleason house and the Albemarle County Jail to Wavertree Hall and Zion Baptist Church, with 26 color photographs and 369 black-and-white illustrations complementing his text. A final chapter discusses the University of Virginia. Maps of the area allow readers and visitors to trace the locations of individual buildings and to recognize trends of settlement and construction in the area. As an elegant giftbook or reference, The Architecture of Jefferson Country gives architects, historians, visitors, and residents an unprecedented view of the wealth of buildings in Charlottesville and Albemarle County.