The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

During the 18th century, the Ottoman Empire sustained extensive territorial losses, and the Balkan nationalities, aided by European arms and diplomacy, began their struggle for liberation. The term "Armenian question," as used in European history, became commonplace among diplomatic circles and in the popular press after the Congress of Berlin, referring to European powers' involvement with the Armenians. The "Armenian question" remained a factor in international politics, and Russia became increasingly involved in Ottoman affairs following intervention in 1877-1878. Russia gained control over a large part of Armenia and became the champion of the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, taking on the role of protector. The Armenian Question in the Caucasus: Russian Archive Documents and Publications is issued in a three volume collection as a special topic of study for the first time in world historiography. The complex topic is presented here, based on rare documents and publications which were long stored as secret and top secret in the Russian State Historical Archive (St. Petersburg) and the Russian State Military History Archive (Moscow). Volume 3 chronologically follows the period 1906-1914. It comprises two sections: the first section provides an analysis of the documents and materials. The second section contains copies of the originals from archives and publications. Many the documents and materials are now made publically available here for the first time. To guarantee academic objectivity, the contextual integrity of the archive documents have been preserved. All materials are arranged chronologically and by topic. The collection provides the reader with the opportunity to undertake a critical review of current theses on the Armenian question. It also assists the application of contemporary academic methods to a comprehensive study of the essence of this question.

The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

During the 18th century, the Ottoman Empire sustained extensive territorial losses, and the Balkan nationalities, aided by European arms and diplomacy, began their struggle for liberation. The term "Armenian question," as used in European history, became commonplace among diplomatic circles and in the popular press after the Congress of Berlin, referring to European powers' involvement with the Armenians. The "Armenian question" remained a factor in international politics, and Russia became increasingly involved in Ottoman affairs following intervention in 1877-1878. Russia gained control over a large part of Armenia and became the champion of the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, taking on the role of protector. The Armenian Question in the Caucasus: Russian Archive Documents and Publications is issued in a three volume collection as a special topic of study for the first time in world historiography. The complex topic is presented here, based on rare documents and publications which were long stored as secret and top secret in the Russian State Historical Archive (St. Petersburg) and the Russian State Military History Archive (Moscow). Volume 3 chronologically follows the period 1906-1914. It comprises two sections: the first section provides an analysis of the documents and materials. The second section contains copies of the originals from archives and publications. Many the documents and materials are now made publically available here for the first time. To guarantee academic objectivity, the contextual integrity of the archive documents have been preserved. All materials are arranged chronologically and by topic. The collection provides the reader with the opportunity to undertake a critical review of current theses on the Armenian question. It also assists the application of contemporary academic methods to a comprehensive study of the essence of this question.

The History of the Armenian Genocide

The History of the Armenian Genocide

The History of the Armenian Genocide

Dadrian, a former professor at SUNY, Geneseo, currently directs a genocide study project supported by the Guggenheim Foundation. The present study analyzes the devastating wartime destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire as the cataclysmic culmination of a historical process involving the progressive Turkish decimation of the Armenians through intermittent and incremental massacres. In addition to the excellent general bibliography there is an annotated bibliography of selected books used in the study. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

The Armenian Question in the Caucasus

During the 18th century, the Ottoman Empire sustained extensive territorial losses, and the Balkan nationalities, aided by European arms and diplomacy, began their struggle for liberation. The term "Armenian question," as used in European history, became commonplace among diplomatic circles and in the popular press after the Congress of Berlin, referring to European powers' involvement with the Armenians. The "Armenian question" remained a factor in international politics, and Russia became increasingly involved in Ottoman affairs following intervention in 1877-1878. Russia gained control over a large part of Armenia and became the champion of the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, taking on the role of protector. The Armenian Question in the Caucasus: Russian Archive Documents and Publications is issued in a three volume collection as a special topic of study for the first time in world historiography. The complex topic is presented here, based on rare documents and publications which were long stored as secret and top secret in the Russian State Historical Archive (St. Petersburg) and the Russian State Military History Archive (Moscow). Volume 1 chronologically follows the period 1724-1904. It comprises two sections: the first section provides an analysis of the documents and materials. The second section contains copies of the originals from archives and publications. Many the documents and materials are now made publically available here for the first time. To guarantee academic objectivity, the contextual integrity of the archive documents have been preserved. All materials are arranged chronologically and by topic. The collection provides the reader with the opportunity to undertake a critical review of current theses on the Armenian question. It also assists the application of contemporary academic methods to a comprehensive study of the essence of this question.

Studies on the Armenian Question

Studies on the Armenian Question

Studies on the Armenian Question

The Armenian Question is part of a larger problem, formulated under the name "The Question of the Orient”, which has been brought up in different forms at different times and places. Throughout history, it is part of the games that have been played countless times against the Turkish people and state. Again, this problem constitutes a different face of the imperialist politics applied by the great states throughout the Balkans, the Caucasus, the Middle East and Anatolia throughout history. Although those who direct the issue of "relocation” have acted individually or collectively, the target has always been the Turkish people and state. This valuable work of Kemal Çiçek seeks an answer to this question. It is an extremely rigorous and, most importantly, an impartial study. In addition, this book provides sound information not only for scholars, but also for the general reader who is interested in this problem.

The Armenian Question

The Armenian Question

The Armenian Question


U S Interests in the Caucasus Region

U S  Interests in the Caucasus Region

U S Interests in the Caucasus Region


A German Officer During the Armenian Genocide

A German Officer During the Armenian Genocide

A German Officer During the Armenian Genocide

Max Scheubner Richter, co-founder of the Nazi Party in Germany, was the German vice-consul in Erzeroum during the genocide of Armenians in Ottoman Turkey. The translation includes an extensive, new introduction by Hilmar Kaiser.