The Carbon Star Phenomenon

The Carbon Star Phenomenon

The Carbon Star Phenomenon

Proceedings of the 177th Symposium of the International Astronomical Union, held in Antalya, Turkey, May 27-31, 1996

The Carbon Star Phenomenon

The Carbon Star Phenomenon

The Carbon Star Phenomenon

The atmospheres of many stars have chemical compositions that are significantly different from that of the interstellar medium from which they are formed. This symposium considered all kinds of late-type stars showing altered compositions, the carbon stars being simply the best-known of these. All stages of stellar evolution from the main sequence to the ejection of a planetary nebula were considered, with emphasis on the changes that occur on the asymptotic giant branch. The spectroscopic properties of the photospheres and circumstellar envelopes of chemically-peculiar red giant stars, their origins via single-star evolution or mass transfer in binary systems, and the methods currently used to study them were all discussed in detail. This volume includes the full texts of papers given orally at the symposium and abstracts of the posters.

Properties of Galactic Carbon Stars

Properties of Galactic Carbon Stars

Properties of Galactic Carbon Stars

Recent advances in the study of carbon stars, including the photometry, variability, colour and spectral characteristics of carbon stars, are examined in this text. Topics such as classification, atmospheric modelling, and the determination of chemical composition are discussed.

Why Galaxies Care about AGB Stars

Why Galaxies Care about AGB Stars

Why Galaxies Care about AGB Stars

"These proceedings of an international conference held August 2006 in Vienna, Austria demonstrate the relevance of Asymptotic Giant Branch stars and stellar astrophysics as a whole for our understanding of galactic structure and evolution. The meeting brought together astronomers from the fields of AGB stars, galactic evolution, and stellar populations. What do we know about the various aspects of AGB stars, such as nucleosynthesis and mass loss, that will play a role in our understanding of galaxies? At the same time, what do galactic models need from the AGB star community, and how are AGB starts included in these models? What will be the role of AGB star research within the major aims of astrophysics in the coming decades? These were the main questions we wanted to discuss at this conference. Recent developments in instrumentation such as the Spitzer satellite and current and forthcoming ground-based equipment are enabling detailes studies of individual stars and the exploration of ever more distant stellar systems. AGB stars are among the first targets that can now be resolved in galaxies outside the Local Group. But of equal relevance are the exciting developments that have been achieved in modeling stellar nucleosynthesis, mass loss, and the evolution of galaxies. The book is suitable for researchers and graduate students interested in stellar and extragalactic astrophysics, and in physical processes related to nucleosynthesis, radiation hydrodynamics, pulsation, mass loss, and the chemical evolution of stellar systems." -- supplied by publisher.

Stars with the B e Phenomenon

Stars with the B e  Phenomenon

Stars with the B e Phenomenon


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