The Chalk Circle Man

The Chalk Circle Man

The Chalk Circle Man

Discover the addictive first book in Fred Vargas’s internationally acclaimed Jean-Baptiste Adamsberg series ‘The hottest property in contemporary crime fiction’ Guardian Jean-Baptiste Adamsberg is not like other policemen. His methods appear unorthodox in the extreme: he doesn't search for clues; he ignores obvious suspects and arrests people with cast-iron alibis; he appears permanently distracted. In spite of all this his colleagues are forced to admit that he is a born cop. When strange blue chalk circles start appearing overnight on the pavements of Paris, only Adamsberg takes them - and the increasingly bizarre objects found within them - seriously. And when the body of a woman with her throat savagely cut is found in one, only Adamsberg realises that other murders will soon follow... ‘Rich and witty' Independent **Winner of The CWA Duncan Lawrie International Dagger**

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

Written in exile during the Second World War, the story of Brecht's classic play subverts an ancient Chinese tale - echoed in the Judgement of Solomon - in which two women claim the same child. The message of Brecht's parable is that resources should go to those who will make best use of them. Thanks to the rascally judge, Azdak, one of Brecht's most vivid creations, this story has a happy outcome: the child is entrusted to the peasant Grusha, who has loved and nurtured it. Published in Methuen Drama's Modern Classics series, this edition features an extensive introduction, Brecht's own notes on the play and a full appendix of textual variants. It is the standard critical edition of the work in an acclaimed translation by James and Tania Stern with W. H. Auden.

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

A servant girl sacrifices everything to protect a child abandoned in the heat of civil war. Order restored, she is made to confront the boy's biological mother in a legal contest over who deserves to keep him. The comical judge calls on an ancient tradition - the chalk circle to resolve the dispute. Who wins? A morality masterpiece, The Caucasian Chalk Circle demonstrates Brecht's pioneering theatrical techniques. This version by Frank McGuinness was first presented by the National Theatre in 1997 and revived in 2007, opening at the Gulbenkian Theatre, Canterbury, on 8 January.

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The people of two farms in Georgia (Republic of Russia) debate over land ownership in a socialistic society. The play raises the question of private property; of who bears the right to ownership. Should something (someone) be owned by the one who possesses it? Or, by the one who can make the best use of it?

The Chalk Circle

The Chalk Circle

The Chalk Circle


Chalk Circle

Chalk Circle

Chalk Circle


The Chalk Circle

The Chalk Circle

The Chalk Circle


The Chalk Circle

The Chalk Circle

The Chalk Circle


The Chalk Circle

The Chalk Circle

The Chalk Circle


The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

The Caucasian Chalk Circle

Brecht projects an ancient Chinese story onto a realistic setting in Soviet Georgia. In a theme that echoes the Judgment of Solomon, two women argue over the possession of a child. Thanks to the unruly judge, Azdak (one of Brecht's most vivid creations) natural justice is done and the peasant Grusha keeps the child she loves, even though she is not its mother. Written while Brecht was in exile in the United States during the Second World War, The Caucasian Chalk Circle is a politically charged, much-revived and complex example of Brecht's epic theatre. This new Student Edition contains introductory commentary and notes by Kristopher Imbriggota from the University of Puget Sound, US, offering a much-needed contemporary perspective on the play. The introduction covers: - narrative structure: play about a play within a play ("circle") - songs and music - justice and social systems - context: Brecht, exile, WWII, socialism - notions of collective and class - fable and story adaptation, folk fairy tale