The Charm Stone

The Charm Stone

The Charm Stone

When it comes to love... When expert surfer Josie Griffin has a rare wipeout, she’s shocked to discover that a real-life treasure chest is to blame—one that contains a necklace hung with the biggest stone she’s ever seen. But that’s nothing compared to the shock she gets when she places the jewel around her neck. Instantly a mysterious little kilted man appears to inform her that the charm has betrothed her to an eighteenth-century Scottish laird! It’s not that Josie has anything against handsome lairds—or older men. But three hundred plus years may be stretching things a bit. After all, she has a career to consider. And besides, she’s sure the effects of her concussion will be wearing off any minute—until the minutes turn to hours...then days... A little charm goes a long way The spirit of Connal MacNeil has been waiting centuries for his betrothed to appear on Scotland’s roaring shores. Josie’s arrival with the MacNeil charm stone is his dream come true. Her passion is a fiery match to his own—and her powerful body is perfect for bearing the heir he plans. He bargained his soul for this last chance at prosperity, and he won’t take no for an answer. Unfortunately the lass doesn’t quite understand that destiny has bound them for all eternity. In fact, she seems determined to deny him at every turn—when she isn’t busy with her foolhardy need to go wave hunting. But it doesn’t take long for other, more earthly MacNeil charms to take hold. For Josie is only human—and Connal has waited long enough for the love affair of his lifetime to finally begin....

The Charm Stone

The Charm Stone

The Charm Stone

Witches weren't burned in the colony of Virginia. They were hanged. But in the twenty-first century no one should be hanging from the trees of historic Williamsburg...

Making Pictures in Stone

Making Pictures in Stone

Making Pictures in Stone

The Indians of northeastern North America are known to us primarily through reports and descriptions written by European explorers, clergy, and settlers, and through archaeological evidence. An additional invaluable source of information is the interpretation of rock art images and their relationship to native peoples for recording practical matters or information, as expressions of their legends and spiritual traditions, or as simple doodling or graffiti. The images in this book connect us directly to the Indian peoples of the Northeast, mainly Algonkian tribes inhabiting eastern Pennsylvania, Maryland and the lower Potomac River Valley, New York, New Jersey, the six New EnglandStates, and Atlantic Canada. Lenik provides a full range of rock art appearances in the study area, including some dendroglyphs, pictographs, and a selection of portable rock objects. By providing a full analysis and synthesis of the data, including the types and distribution of the glyphs, and interpretations of their meaning to the native peoples, Lenik reveals a wealth of new information on the culture and lifeways of the Indians of the Northeast.