The Chicago L

The Chicago  L

The Chicago L

Offers a history of the world famous Chicago "L," the elevated railroad that has operated since 1892 and has been ridden by more than ten billion people.

Michael Brein s Guide to Chicago by The L

Michael Brein s Guide to Chicago by The  L

Michael Brein s Guide to Chicago by The L

- Top 50 attractions by public transit- Ultra-large official transit maps- Detailed mini-area maps- Exact directions to attractions from nearest transit stops- City transit systems simplified- Cheapest way to sightsee- Easy to use

Along the Chicago South Shore South Bend Rail Line

Along the Chicago South Shore   South Bend Rail Line

Along the Chicago South Shore South Bend Rail Line

Starting in 1901 as a three-mile-long trolley line in East Chicago, Indiana, the Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad expanded in 1908 to connect South Bend, Indiana, with Chicago, Illinois. Once a treasure in the Sam Insull utilities empire, today it is the only functioning electric interurban in the United States. From a world-class city through rolling agricultural acres, from steel mills through a national lakeshore, some 200 vintage photographs illustrate the unique view of the Calumet region that South Shore passengers have traditionally enjoyed. Images of rolling stock, passenger depots, excursion destinations, and historic sites along the way combine to reveal the century-long story of the railroad and its 90-mile corridor.

The Loop

The Loop

The Loop

The structure that anchors Chicago Every day Chicagoans rely on the loop of elevated train tracks to get to their jobs, classrooms, or homes in the city’s downtown. But how much do they know about the single most important structure in the history of the Windy City? In engagingly brisk prose, Patrick T. Reardon unfolds the fascinating story about how Chicago’s elevated Loop was built, gave its name to the downtown, helped unify the city, saved the city’s economy, and was itself saved from destruction in the 1970s. This unique volume combines urban history, biography, engineering, architecture, transportation, culture, and politics to explore the elevated Loop’s impact on the city’s development and economy and on the way Chicagoans see themselves. The Loop rooted Chicago’s downtown in a way unknown in other cities, and it protected that area—and the city itself—from the full effects of suburbanization during the second half of the twentieth century. Masses of data underlie new insights into what has made Chicago’s downtown, and the city as a whole, tick. The Loop features a cast of colorful Chicagoans, such as legendary lawyer Clarence Darrow, poet Edgar Lee Masters, mayor Richard J. Daley, and the notorious Gray Wolves of the Chicago City Council. Charles T. Yerkes, an often-demonized figure, is shown as a visionary urban planner, and engineer John Alexander Low Waddell, a world-renowned bridge creator, is introduced to Chicagoans as the designer of their urban railway. This fascinating exploration of how one human-built structure reshaped the social and economic landscape of Chicago is the definitive book on Chicago’s elevated Loop.

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report


Cta Brown Line Stations

Cta Brown Line Stations

Cta Brown Line Stations

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 23. Chapters: Adams/Wabash (CTA station), Addison (CTA Brown Line station), Armitage (CTA station), Belmont (CTA North Side Main Line station), Chicago (CTA Brown and Purple Lines station), Clark/Lake (CTA station), Damen (CTA Brown Line station), Diversey (CTA station), Francisco (CTA station), Fullerton (CTA station), Harold Washington Library - State/Van Buren (CTA station), Irving Park (CTA Brown Line station), Kedzie (CTA Brown Line station), Kimball (CTA station), LaSalle/Van Buren (CTA station), Madison/Wabash (CTA station), Merchandise Mart (CTA station), Montrose (CTA Brown Line station), Paulina (CTA station), Quincy (CTA station), Randolph/Wabash (CTA station), Rockwell (CTA station), Sedgwick (CTA station), Southport (CTA station), State/Lake (CTA station), Washington/Wabash (CTA station), Washington/Wells (CTA station), Wellington (CTA station), Western (CTA Brown Line station). Excerpt: Fullerton is an 'L' station on the Chicago Transit Authority's Brown and Red Lines. Purple Line express trains also stop at the station during weekday rush hours. It is an elevated station with two island platforms, located in the Lincoln Park neighborhood in Chicago, Illinois. Brown and Purple Line trains share the outer tracks while Red Line trains run on the inner tracks. As well as being an important transfer station, the station serves the Lincoln Park Campus of DePaul University. Fullerton Station opened in 1900 as an express/local stop on the Northwestern Elevated Railroad. In the 1920s, the station's platforms were lengthened to serve eight-car trains, but due to surrounding buildings the platforms were lengthened in different directions; the northbound platform was extended northward, and the southbound platform was extended to the south. In 1949, an additional set of exit stairs was added at Fullerton as well as a 15 feet (4.6 m) tall supervisor's booth on the platform. Off-peak shuttle service on the Ravenswood Line ran from Kimball to Fullerton until 1961, when the shuttles were cut back to their present-day terminus at Belmont. In 1983, the CTA decided to lease the space beneath Fullerton to a business. The CTA, led by chairman Michael Cardilli, granted the lease to Peter Schivarelli, a friend and former coworker of Cardilli's. Schivarelli built the hot dog stand Demon Dogs in the space. While Schivarelli paid for the construction of the stand, he owed a low rent on the property, and the CTA paid the utility bills for the building. The CTA ended this arrangement in 1998 upon its being made public, and Schivarelli sued the CTA as a result. A trial court ruled in favor of Schivarelli, but the CTA appealed the decision, and it was overturned by an appellate court. Demon Dogs remained open until 2005, when it was removed during the station's reconstruction. In 1989, Evanston Express trains began stopping at Fullerton due to increased ridership. The original