The FN FAL Battle Rifle

The FN FAL Battle Rifle

The FN FAL Battle Rifle

Of all the infantry small arms developed during World War II, one that generated the most interest was the German 'assault rifle', the StG 44 Sturmgewehr. This innovative weapon inspired the Soviet AK-47 in 7.62x39mm calibre. In the West, the NATO countries looked hard at new weapons to upgrade their own infantry arsenals and counter the AK-47, resulting in the design of the Fusil Automatique Léger or FAL. It proved to be a successful battle rifle and was soon adopted by the military and police forces of no fewer than 93 nations. The FAL dominated the militaries of the West to such a degree that its nickname became the Right Arm of the Free World. The FAL fulfilled every role it was asked to perform and remains a viable and well-respected weapon to this day.

Battle Rifles

Battle Rifles

Battle Rifles

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 56. Chapters: FN FAL, Heckler & Koch G3, M14 rifle, L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle, AR-10, FG 42, Howa Type 89, FN SCAR, Armalite AR-18, List of battle rifles, Howa Type 64, SIG SG 510, Mk 14 Enhanced Battle Rifle, Heckler & Koch HK417, Kel-Tec RFB, CETME, Leader Dynamics Series T2 MK5, Armalite AR-16, SAR-80, Bushmaster M17S, SR-88, Olin/Winchester Salvo Rifle, FA-MAS Type 62, Madsen LAR, AVB-7.62, SLEM-1, Model 45A, SOCIMI AR-832, KAL1 General Purpose Infantry Rifle, Chropi rifle, Cristobal Model 3, HIW VSK, Sterling 7.62, Sterling SAR-87, ITM Model 3, Sieg rifle, Saritch 308, SIG AK53, ParaFAL, Itajuba Model 954 Mosquetao, Kepplinger HV-71, Franchi LF-59, Calzada Bayo CB-57, FM57 rifle, GRAM 63 battle rifle. Excerpt: The Fusil Automatique Leger ("Light Automatic Rifle") or FAL is a self-loading, selective fire battle rifle produced by the Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN). During the Cold War it was adopted by many North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries, with the notable exception of the United States. It is one of the most widely used rifles in history, having been used by over 90 countries. The FAL was predominantly chambered for the 7.62x51mm NATO round, and because of its prevalence and widespread use among the armed forces of many NATO countries during the Cold War it was nicknamed "The right arm of the Free World." A British Commonwealth derivative of the FN FAL has been produced under licence as the L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle. In 1947, the first FN FAL prototype was completed. It was designed to fire the intermediate 7.92x33mm Kurz cartridge developed and used by the forces of Nazi Germany during World War II (see StG44 assault rifle). After testing this prototype in 1948, the British Army urged FN to build additional prototypes, including one in bullpup configuration, chambered for...

Cold War Rifles

Cold War Rifles

Cold War Rifles

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 86. Chapters: AK-74, FN FAL, Mosin-Nagant, Comparison of the AK-47 and M16, Heckler & Koch G3, M14 rifle, SKS, L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle, Dragunov sniper rifle, AKM, Type 56 assault rifle, Vz. 58, FAMAS, Howa Type 64, SIG SG 510, PSL, FN Model 1949, Zastava M70, Zastava M76, Pistol Mitralier model 1963/1965, MAS-49 rifle, Vz. 52 rifle, Type 81 assault rifle, Type 63 assault rifle, AMD 65, Rk 62, AK-63, Beretta BM59, Norinco Type 86S, Olin/Winchester Salvo Rifle, FA-MAS Type 62, Madsen LAR, Hakim Rifle, TKB-072, KAL1 General Purpose Infantry Rifle, Chropi rifle, Rasheed Carbine, 80.002, Kbkg wz. 1960, FN Model 30-11, NA-2, NA-4, AO-46 personal defence weapon, AO-62 assault rifle, AO-222, AO-27 rifle, Shkval, FM57 rifle, GRAM 63 battle rifle. Excerpt: The Fusil Automatique Leger ("Light Automatic Rifle") or FAL is a self-loading, selective fire battle rifle produced by the Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN). During the Cold War it was adopted by many North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries, with the notable exception of the United States. It is one of the most widely used rifles in history, having been used by over 90 countries. The FAL was predominantly chambered for the 7.62x51mm NATO round, and because of its prevalence and widespread use among the armed forces of many NATO countries during the Cold War it was nicknamed "The right arm of the Free World." A British Commonwealth derivative of the FN FAL has been produced under licence as the L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle. In 1947, the first FN FAL prototype was completed. It was designed to fire the intermediate 7.92x33mm Kurz cartridge developed and used by the forces of Nazi Germany during World War II (see StG44 assault rifle). After testing this prototype in 1948, the British Army urged FN to build additional prototypes, including one in...

Battle Rifles

Battle Rifles

Battle Rifles

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Fn Fal, Heckler

The Battle Rifle

The Battle Rifle

The Battle Rifle

While the 20th century brought many technological advancements to the battlefield, a key weapon of warfare remains the soldier and his rifle. This volume chronicles the historical development of the modern service rifle after World War II and examines its resurgence in Afghanistan after generations of absence following the introduction of the assault rifle. Individual chapters survey the most combat-tested models—including the FN FAL, U.S. M14 and HK 417—in technical detail, emphasizing key points in the evolution of rifle technology and ammunition. Also explored is the development of the current M16 series rifle, and how recent difficulties in Afghanistan have led to an increasing reliance on the venerable M14. Providing a strong knowledge base of the various weapons now in service throughout the world, this instructive work demonstrates that the battle rifle has not outlived its usefulness.

FN FAL SLR Owner s Guide

FN FAL SLR Owner s Guide

FN FAL SLR Owner s Guide

First introduced in 1946 by Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale, the Fusil Automatique Léger (Light Automatic Rifle), or FAL, has been used by military or police forces in more than 90 countries. In various versions, it has served from the Arctic conditions of northern Canada and Norway to the world's highest battlefield, Siachen Glacier in the Himalayas, at nearly 20,000 feet above sea level. It fought in the jungles of Malaya and Vietnam, the bush of Rhodesia and South Africa, the deserts of the Middle East, and the treeless desolation of the Falklands Islands. Nicknamed the "right arm of the Free World" during the Cold War, the FAL is considered the quintessential postwar battle rifle. From this basic infantry rifle, the FAL also found form in a wide variety of select-fire and semiautomatic fixed and folding-stock carbines of various lengths and weights for military and police weaponry. Powerful, reliable, easy to maintain, and reasonably accurate, the FAL has served well in many guises and can be found in a model to fit any taste. All this adds up to a viable and readily available rifle that remains popular among shooters, tactical and otherwise, as well collectors and just plain gun nuts. Author Robert Cashner took his collection of commonly encountered and readily available FAL models the American gun owner and shooter is most likely to encounter out to the range and the field and the mountains in all kinds of weather to see what they are really made of. This book is for the FAL/SLR owner, especially the shooter, as well as the potential FAL buyer, to provide a detailed look at the venerable weapon: how it functions, how to care for it, how to modify it for individual needs, and the vast array of accessories available for it.

Falklands War Infantry Weapons

Falklands War Infantry Weapons

Falklands War Infantry Weapons

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 47. Chapters: Browning Hi-Power, FN FAL, M2 Browning machine gun, FN MAG, Bren light machine gun, M72 LAW, M3 submachine gun, Sterling submachine gun, Carl Gustav recoilless rifle, M79 grenade launcher, Ballester-Molina, L16 81mm Mortar, SB-33 mine, L9A1 51 mm Light Mortar, Halcon ML-63, FMK-3 submachine gun, FMK-1 mine, M1 mine, SB-81 mine, FMK-3 mine, C-3-A/B mine, No 6 mine. Excerpt: The Fusil Automatique Leger ("Light Automatic Rifle") or FAL is a self-loading, selective fire battle rifle produced by the Belgian armaments manufacturer Fabrique Nationale de Herstal (FN). During the Cold War it was adopted by many North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) countries, with the notable exception of the United States. It is one of the most widely used rifles in history, having been used by over 90 countries. The FAL was predominantly chambered for the 7.62x51mm NATO round, and because of its prevalence and widespread use among the armed forces of many NATO countries during the Cold War it was nicknamed "The right arm of the Free World." A British Commonwealth derivative of the FN FAL has been produced under licence as the L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle. In 1947, the first FN FAL prototype was completed. It was designed to fire the intermediate 7.92x33mm Kurz cartridge developed and used by the forces of Nazi Germany during World War II (see StG44 assault rifle). After testing this prototype in 1948, the British Army urged FN to build additional prototypes, including one in bullpup configuration, chambered for their new .280 British caliber intermediate cartridge. After evaluating the single bullpup prototype, FN decided to return instead to their original, conventional design for future production. In 1950, the United Kingdom presented the redesigned FN rifle and the British EM-2, both in .280 British calibre, to the United States for...

Infantry

Infantry

Infantry


The M14 Battle Rifle

The M14 Battle Rifle

The M14 Battle Rifle

The M14 may have only been the primary US service rifle for a little over a decade before being replaced by the M16, but it is still considered by many experts to be the best rifle to ever see US service. Primarily designed for a war in Europe, where it would take its place alongside the other battle rifles like the FN FAL, the M14 saw most of its combat use in the early days of the Vietnam War. Maintained until 1970 for compatibility with NATO forces the M14 had a renaissance as a semi-automatic sniping weapon and since 2001 the M14 has been employed as a Designated Marksman Rifle, being employed by all branches of the US military, especially in Afghanistan where the open terrain makes longer-range engagements common. Featuring specially commissioned full-color artwork and archive and close-up photographs, this engaging study tells the story of the M14, the long-lived battle rifle that remains in front-line service with US forces more than 50 years after its first adoption.