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This is a new release of the original 1925 edition.

The Future of Intelligence

The Future of Intelligence

The Future of Intelligence

Intelligence is, by definition, a shadowy business. Yet many aspects of this secret world are now more openly analyzed and discussed, a trend which has inevitably prompted lively debate about intelligence gathering and analysis: what should be allowed? What boundaries, if any, should be drawn? And what changes and challenges lie ahead for intelligence activities and agencies? In this compelling book, leading intelligence scholar Mark Lowenthal explores the future of intelligence. There are, he argues, three broad areas – information technology and intelligence collection; analysis; and governance – that indicate the potential for rather dramatic change in the world of intelligence. But whether these important vectors for change will improve how intelligence works or make it more difficult remains to be seen. The only certainty is that intelligence will remain an essential feature of statecraft in our increasingly dangerous world. Drawing on the author's forty years' experience in U.S. intelligence, The Future of Intelligence offers a broad and authoritative starting point for the ongoing debate about what intelligence could be and how it may function in the years ahead.

The Future of Intelligence

The Future of Intelligence

The Future of Intelligence

This volume discusses the challenges the future holds for different aspects of the intelligence process and for organisations working in the field. The main focus of Western intelligence services is no longer on the intentions and capabilities of the Soviet Union and its allies. Instead, at present, there is a plethora of threats and problems that deserve attention. Some of these problems are short-term and potentially acute, such as terrorism. Others, such as the exhaustion of natural resources, are longer-term and by nature often more difficult to foresee in their implications. This book analyses the different activities that make up the intelligence process, or the ‘intelligence cycle’, with a focus on changes brought about by external developments in the international arena, such as technology and security threats. Drawing together a range of key thinkers in the field, The Future of Intelligence examines possible scenarios for future developments, including estimations about their plausibility, and the possible consequences for the functioning of intelligence and security services. This book will be of much interest to students of intelligence studies, strategic studies, foreign policy, security studies and IR in general.

The Future of Intelligence in the 21st Century

The Future of Intelligence in the 21st Century

The Future of Intelligence in the 21st Century

"Described as the world's 'second oldest profession,' espionage was born from the often desperate need of our ancestors to find out what our adversary or enemy or neighbor was doing or preparing. Intelligence therefore, has been sought after and used for thousands of years, especially in times of conflict. This research paper endeavors to predict what the world of intelligence may look like later this century. To simply hypothesize or second guess makes no sense, there are far too many imponderables; yet there are clues emerging today, and trends from yesteryear that we can examine--as well as incidents that have changed history--and analyzing this information could provide a useful and compelling insight."--Introduction.

The Future of Intelligence

The Future of Intelligence

The Future of Intelligence


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The Future of Foreign Intelligence

The Future of Foreign Intelligence

The Future of Foreign Intelligence

"Since the Revolutionary War, America's military and political leaders have recognized that U.S. national security depends upon the collection of intelligence. Absent information about foreign threats, the thinking went, the country and its citizens stood in great peril. To address this, the Courts and Congress have historically given the President broad leeway to obtain foreign intelligence. But in order to find information about an individual in the United States, the executive branch had to demonstrate that the person was an agent of a foreign power. Today, that barrier no longer exists. The intelligence community now collects massive amounts of data and then looks for potential threats to the United States. As renowned national security law scholar Laura K. Donohue explains in The Future of Foreign Intelligence, the internet and new technologies such as biometric identification systems have not changed our lives in countless ways. But they have also led to a very worrying transformation. The amount and types of information that the government can obtain has radically expanded, and information that is being collected for foreign intelligence purposes is now being used for domestic criminal prosecution. Traditionally, the Courts have allowed exceptions to the Fourth Amendment rule barring illegal search and seizure on national security grounds. But the new ways in which we collect intelligence are swallowing the rule altogether. Just as alarming, the ever-weaker standards that mark foreign intelligence collection are now being used domestically-and the convergence between these realms threatens individual liberty. Donohue traces the evolution of foreign intelligence law and pairs that account with the progress of Fourth Amendment jurisprudence. She argues that the programmatic surveillance that the National Security Agency conducts amounts to a general warrant-the prevention of which was the point of introducing the Fourth Amendment. The expansion of foreign intelligence surveillance-leant momentum by significant advances in technology, the Global War on Terror, and the emphasis on securing the homeland-now threatens to consume protections essential to privacy, which is a necessary component of a healthy democracy. Donohue offers an agenda for reining in the national security state's expansive reach, primarily through Congressional statutory reform that will force the executive and judicial branches to take privacy seriously, even as it provides for the continued collection of intelligence central to U.S. national security. Both alarming and penetrating, this is essential reading for anyone interested in the future of foreign intelligence and privacy in the United States"--

The Future of Intelligent Automation

The Future of Intelligent Automation

The Future of Intelligent Automation

Since the 1800s, automation has been assisting humans in taking up roles in different industries like finance, travels, healthcare, education, and different sectors of life. This invention has developed to what we now see as intelligent automation because of its major capacity to learn and adapt to novel situations through a process called deep learning. Today, intelligent automation is performing amazing roles and making life much easier for us.Intelligent automation is deployed for tasks such as customer care, fraud identification, teaching, and facial recognition. Because it's making so much impact in today's world, we're tempted to seek the future of automation.The future of automation is roped with the certainty of robotic software, not just being automated but intelligent. The future will have humans engaged in major roles such as programming, creativity, and supervision because automation has become highly intelligent enough to finish up simple and complex tasks.Welcome to the Intelligent Automation Adventure!

Future Minds

Future Minds

Future Minds

For Readers of Michio Kaku and Stephen Hawking, an Epic Journey through the Intelligent Universe With the ongoing advancement of AI and other technologies, our world is becoming increasingly intelligent. From chatbots to innovations in brain-computer interfaces to the possibility of superintelligences leading to the Singularity later this century, our reality is being transformed before our eyes. This is commonly seen as the natural result of progress, but what if there’s more to it than that? What if intelligence is an inevitability, an underlying property of the universe? In Future Minds, Richard Yonck challenges our assumptions about intelligence—what it is, how it came to exist, its place in the development of life on Earth and possibly throughout the cosmos. Taking a Big History perspective—over the 14 billion years from the Big Bang to the present and beyond—he draws on recent developments in physics and complexity theory to explore the questions: Why do pockets of increased complexity develop, giving rise to life, intelligence, and civilization? How will it grow and change throughout this century, transforming both technology and humanity? As we expand outward from our planet, will we discover other forms of intelligence, or will we conclude we are destined to go it alone? Any way we look at it, the nature of intelligence in the universe is becoming a central concern for humanity. Ours. Theirs. And everything in between.