Shakespeare on the German Stage Volume 2 The Twentieth Century

Shakespeare on the German Stage  Volume 2  The Twentieth Century

Shakespeare on the German Stage Volume 2 The Twentieth Century

Shakespeare has been a central figure in German literature and theatre. This book tells the story of Shakespeare in the German-speaking theatre against the background of German culture and politics in the twentieth century. It follows the earlier volume by Simon Williams on the reception of Shakespeare during the previous 300 years (Shakespeare on the German Stage, 1586-1914). Hortmann concentrates on the two most important and fruitful periods: the years of the Weimar Republic (1919-1933) and the turbulent decades of the sixties and seventies, when the German theatre was revitalised by a stormy marriage of avant-garde art and revolutionary politics. A section by Maik Hamburger covers developments in the theatres of the German Democratic Republic. Hortmann focuses on the most representative and colourful directors and actors, describing and illustrating individual productions as examples of particular trends or movements.

A History of German Theatre

A History of German Theatre

A History of German Theatre

Covering German-language theatre from the Middle Ages to the present day, this study demonstrates how and why theatre became so important in German-speaking countries. Written by leading international scholars of German theatre, chapters cover all aspects of theatrical performance, including acting, directing, play-writing, scenic design and theatre architecture. The book argues that theatre is more central to the artistic life of German-speaking countries than anywhere else in the world. Relating German-language theatre to its social and intellectual context, the History demonstrates how theatre has often been used as a political tool. It challenges the idea that German theatre was undeveloped in contrast to other European countries in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, provides a thematic survey of the crucial period of growth in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and discusses modern and contemporary German theatre by focusing in turn on the directors, playwrights, designers and theatre architecture.

The Revolution in German Theatre 1900 1933 Routledge Revivals

The Revolution in German Theatre 1900 1933  Routledge Revivals

The Revolution in German Theatre 1900 1933 Routledge Revivals

First published in 1981, this book represents the first work in English to give a comprehensive account of the revolutionary developments in German theatre from the decline of Naturalism through the Expressionist upheaval to the political theatre of Piscator and Brecht. Early productions of Kaiser’s From Morning till Midnight and Toller’s Transfiguration are presented as examples of Expressionism. A thorough analysis of Piscator’s Hoppla, Such is Life! And Brecht’s Man show the similarities and differences in political theatre. In addition, elements of stage-craft are examined — illustrated with tabulated information, an extensive chronology, and photographs and designs of productions.

Shakespeare on the German Stage Volume 1 1586 1914

Shakespeare on the German Stage  Volume 1  1586 1914

Shakespeare on the German Stage Volume 1 1586 1914

Professor Williams focuses on the classical period of German literature and theatre, when Shakespeare's plays were first staged in Germany in a relatively complete form, and when they had a potent influence on the writings of German drama and dramatic criticism.

The German Theatre

   The    German Theatre

The German Theatre


Partnership in the German Theatre

Partnership in the German Theatre

Partnership in the German Theatre

This book is a lens through which the reader may view the German theatre in the middle of the twentieth century. It offers an inside look at the upheavals and personalities shaping the German theatre from 1925 to 1961, when playwright Carl Zuckmayer (1896-1977) and director Heinz Hilpert (1890-1967) together created their major works. Their partnership is the book's major focus, although Brecht, Reinhardt, Kortner, and other major German theatre artists are prominent. The lens sweeps across the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, and finally the Cold War period to examine in detail many events, people, and places important in German theatre history which have, to date, remained unchronicled in English.

The Reception of Grabbe s Hannibal in the German Theatre

The Reception of Grabbe s Hannibal in the German Theatre

The Reception of Grabbe s Hannibal in the German Theatre

After publication in 1835, Grabbe's Hannibal was overlooked by the theatre until this century. Because the drama does not lend itself easily to stage production, a number of adaptations were printed: these are analysed and their merits and shortcomings evaluated. The history of all productions is then viewed against the background of Germany's political and cultural history from 1918 to 1958, examining in detail the approaches of such producers as Jessner, Martin, Schmitt and Schalla and their audience impact. This analysis in turn sheds light on essential qualities of Hannibal.