The Jewish Genocide of Armenian Christians

The Jewish Genocide of Armenian Christians

The Jewish Genocide of Armenian Christians

In 1905, Jewish leaders calling themselves "Young Turks" met in Masonic lodges in Salonika, Italy, Paris and Vienna. They plotted a coup d'etat against the Sultan of Turkey Abdul Hamid II. Jews and crypto-Jewish Doenmeh of the Committee for Union and Progress took over complete control of the Turkish Empire in 1909. They had several goals. Their primary objective was to establish a segregated "Jewish State" in Palestine. They also sought to instigate World War I, to slaughter entire Christian populations, and to destroy the Turkish Empire and supplant Islamic religion and culture with a soulless and cultureless society engineered by Jewish positivists in Vienna, Paris, Italy and Salonika. This is their story.

Why Genocide

Why Genocide

Why Genocide

A comparative sociological analysis of the Turkish massacre of the Armenians and the Nazi Holocaust, using Neil Smelser's theory of collective behavior. Among the mechanisms enabling genocide, points to the creation of "outsiders" (i.e. exclusion by legal measures and creation of a scapegoat image); the destructive use of communications; the presence of a powerful leadership with territorial ambitions; the organization of destruction; and the failure of social control. Ch. 12 (pp. 215-235) surveys external and internal factors which facilitated the implementation of the Holocaust: the involvement of state agencies, the passivity of the Church and the outside world, and the failure of internal control in the Jewish community.

The Armenian Genocide in Perspective

The Armenian Genocide in Perspective

The Armenian Genocide in Perspective

"World War I was a watershed, a defining moment, in Armenian history. Its effects were unprecedented in that it resulted in what no other war, invasion, or occupation had achieved in three thousand years of identifiable Armenian existence. This calamity was the physical elimination of the Armenian people and most of the evidence of their ever having lived on the great Armenian Plateau, to which the perpetrator side soon gave the new name of Eastern Anatolia. The bearers of an impressive martial and cultural history, the Armenians had also known repeated trials and tribulations, waves of massacre, captivity, and exile, but even in the darkest of times there had always been enough remaining to revive, rebuild, and go forward. This third volume in a series edited by Richard Hovannisian, the dean of Armenian historians, provides a unique fusion of the history, philosophy, literature, art, music, and educational aspects of the Armenian experience. It further provides a rich storehouse of information on comparative dimensions of the Armenian genocide in relation to the Assyrian, Greek and Jewish situations, and beyond that, paradoxes in American and French policy responses to the Armenian genocides. The volume concludes with a trio of essays concerning fundamental questions of historiography and politics that either make possible or can inhibit reconciliation of ancient truths and righting ancient wrongs."--

Revolution and Genocide

Revolution and Genocide

Revolution and Genocide

In a study that compares the major attempts at genocide in world history, Robert Melson creates a sophisticated framework that links genocide to revolution and war. He focuses on the plights of Jews after the fall of Imperial Germany and of Armenians after the fall of the Ottoman as well as attempted genocides in the Soviet Union and Cambodia. He argues that genocide often is the end result of a complex process that starts when revolutionaries smash an old regime and, in its wake, try to construct a society that is pure according to ideological standards.

Confronting Genocide

Confronting Genocide

Confronting Genocide

Confronting Genocide: Judaism, Christianity, Islam is the first collection of essays by recognized scholars primarily in the field of religious studies to address this timely topic. In addition to theoretical thinking about both religion and genocide and the relationship between the two, these authors look at the tragedies of the Holocaust, the Armenian Genocide, Rwanda, Bosnia, and the Sudan from their own unique vantage point. In so doing, they supply a much-needed additional contribution to the ongoing conversations proffered by historians, political scientists, sociologists, psychologists, and legal scholars regarding prevention, intervention, and punishment. Book jacket.

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide

The Armenian Genocide

World War I was a watershed, a defining moment, in Armenian history. Its effects were unprecedented in that it resulted in what no other war, invasion, or occupation had achieved in three thousand years of identifiable Armenian existence. This calamity was the physical elimination of the Armenian people and most of the evidence of their ever having lived on the great Armenian Plateau, to which the perpetrator side soon gave the new name of Eastern Anatolia. The bearers of an impressive martial and cultural history, the Armenians had also known repeated trials and tribulations, waves of massacre, captivity, and exile, but even in the darkest of times there had always been enough remaining to revive, rebuild, and go forward. This third volume in a series edited by Richard Hovannisian, the dean of Armenian historians, provides a unique fusion of the history, philosophy, literature, art, music, and educational aspects of the Armenian experience. It further provides a rich storehouse of information on comparative dimensions of the Armenian genocide in relation to the Assyrian, Greek and Jewish situations, and beyond that, paradoxes in American and French policy responses to the Armenian genocides. The volume concludes with a trio of essays concerning fundamental questions of historiography and politics that either make possible or can inhibit reconciliation of ancient truths and righting ancient wrongs.

The History of the Armenian Genocide

The History of the Armenian Genocide

The History of the Armenian Genocide

Dadrian, a former professor at SUNY, Geneseo, currently directs a genocide study project supported by the Guggenheim Foundation. The present study analyzes the devastating wartime destruction of the Armenian population of the Ottoman Empire as the cataclysmic culmination of a historical process involving the progressive Turkish decimation of the Armenians through intermittent and incremental massacres. In addition to the excellent general bibliography there is an annotated bibliography of selected books used in the study. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Einstein s Jewish Science

Einstein s Jewish Science

Einstein s Jewish Science

This volume intertwines science, history, philosophy, theology, and politics in fresh and fascinating ways to solve the multifaceted riddle of what religion means - and what it means to science.

A History of Christian Jewish Hindu Buddhist and Muslim Perspectives on War and Peace A century of wars

A History of Christian  Jewish  Hindu  Buddhist  and Muslim Perspectives on War and Peace  A century of wars

A History of Christian Jewish Hindu Buddhist and Muslim Perspectives on War and Peace A century of wars

"Frost (Swarthmore College) has written widely about peace and Quakers. Here he compiles perspectives from the major world religions on war and peace for general readers who are not specialists in the history of religions, the evolution of wars, the relationship between the two, but are interested in how faith communities in the past dealt with issues similar to those in effect now. In addition, he says particular chapters could be used in undergraduate courses and seminars. Volume two focuses on what it calls a century of wars, from World War I into the post-Cold-War era. The two volumes are paged together, and the index and bibliography for both are contained in each." -- Amazon.