The Kissing Sailor

The Kissing Sailor

The Kissing Sailor

On August 14, 1945, Alfred Eisenstaedt took a picture of a sailor kissing a nurse in Times Square, minutes after they heard of Japan's surrender to the United States. Two weeks later LIFE magazine published that image. It became one of the most famous WWII photographs in history (and the most celebrated photograph ever published in the world's dominant photo-journal), a cherished reminder of what it felt like for the war to finally be over. Everyone who saw the picture wanted to know more about the nurse and sailor, but Eisenstaedt had no information and a search for the mysterious couple's identity took on a dimension of its own. In 1979 Eisenstaedt thought he had found the long lost nurse. And as far as almost everyone could determine, he had. For the next thirty years Edith Shain was known as the woman in the photo of V-J DAY, 1945, TIMES SQUARE. In 1980 LIFE attempted to determine the sailor's identity. Many aging warriors stepped forward with claims, and experts weighed in to support one candidate over another. Chaos ensued. For almost two decades Lawrence Verria and George Galdorisi were intrigued by the controversy surrounding the identity of the two principals in Eisenstaedt's most famous photograph and collected evidence that began to shed light on this mystery. Unraveling years of misinformation and controversy, their findings propelled one claimant s case far ahead of the others and, at the same time, dethroned the supposed kissed nurse when another candidate's claim proved more credible. With this book, the authors solve the 67-year-old mystery by providing irrefutable proof to identify the couple in Eisenstaedt's photo. It is the first time the whole truth behind the celebrated picture has been revealed. The authors also bring to light the couple's and the photographer's brushes with death that nearly prevented their famous spontaneous Times Square meeting in the first place. The sailor, part of Bull Halsey's famous task force, survived the deadly typhoon that took the lives of hundreds of other sailors. The nurse, an Austrian Jew who lost her mother and father in the Holocaust, barely managed to escape to the United States. Eisenstaedt, a World War I German soldier, was nearly killed at Flanders.

Cartoon of Woman Kissing Sailor on Front with Two Women Buying Tickets on Reverse

Cartoon of Woman Kissing Sailor on Front with Two Women Buying Tickets on Reverse

Cartoon of Woman Kissing Sailor on Front with Two Women Buying Tickets on Reverse

Description: Two-sided. One side shows a women sitting on a sailor's lap and kissing him with an SP shaking his finger at them, Printed caption: "Square your hat, Sailor!" Personal caption: "On the Ball/Wallack." The other side shows two women buying tickets from a booth : "Men in Uniform/25 cents." Printed caption: "Here's fifty cents - Let's have two of 'em!".

Wartime Kiss

Wartime Kiss

Wartime Kiss

Collects a series of photos and film stills of kisses and intimate moments from the World War II era, explaining the culture significance of these moments and what they say about society at the time.

Sinner Sailor

Sinner  Sailor

Sinner Sailor

Sinner, Sailor is the autobiographical telling of the author’s navy career from 1945 until 1972, from World War II through Viet Nam. He joined the navy at seventeen seeking adventure and romance; he found both and much more. He went to Korea as a navy hospital corpsman in a marine unit, served at sea aboard a series of aircraft carriers, Boxer, Hancock, and Princeton, in the Pacific, and later as a medical service corps “mustang” officer aboard the carrier Constellation at the time of the Tonkin Gulf incident. Toward the end of that conflict he did a reprise of Korea, ashore in Viet Nam as medical liaison officer with the combined action force of the III Marine Amphibious Force. All battle and no liberty makes for a dull read, so he includes lighter moments of a sailor on liberty in San Diego, Los Angeles, Tijuana, Hong Kong, Osaka, Sasebo, Yokosuka; and of a navy officer in his prime on the loose in San Diego and New York City. Sex, sin, and sailing are not unknown. The author re-creates his experiences using narrative, dialogue, conflict and character as in a novel; telling of events as they happen with the immediacy of happening as it is read: “...Each morning I had to face Mr. Becker, who attempted to counsel me on the principals of leadership. I felt he was trying to change my inner self to him; trying to develop whatever traces of petty tyrant might be hiding in me into a true whipper of men, someone to be feared, an ideal Lange. “You’re going to be Lang’s relief,” he began,” the H Division Police Petty Officer. I need someone who can take charge, and shape up the men... It’ll be your job to make sure everyone in sickbay keeps busy, does their job, and follows orders. Kick ass and take names. Don’t try to make them like you; you’re not in a popularity contest.”... Chapter sixteen. The next day, I went to where she lived when she wasn’t working at the New Black Rose.We talked and joked and then we made love. Afterwards she began to look sad. “Whatsa-matta-you?” I asked. “You Christian?” she asked. I shrugged and said, “I guess so. Why..?” “Why you here, then?” she asked; angry and disillusioned at me and at herself. I was taken aback by her question. I began putting my clothes on. Chapter Sixteen. There are genuine heroes in the book; there are also bureaucrats, time servers, rogues, villains, and scoundrels. Life aboard a ship or ashore with the marines; or liberty in the fleshpots or at home with the family, has rarely been caught so realistically. A good read of the real McCoy.