The Lost Tribes of Pop

The Lost Tribes of Pop

The Lost Tribes of Pop

Few things tell us more about ourselves than the music we listen to, a fact that Tom Cox has demonstrated brilliantly in his acclaimed Observer column, The Lost Tribes of Pop. Extended from that column, Cox's beautifully illustrated book presents a unique and hilarious vision of the current pop climate, via the people who really make it what it is: the fans. From Dave, the Old School Goth, and Charlie, the iPod Twit, to Nancy, the Rave Mom, and Margot, the First-time Gigger, Lost Tribes is an endlessly entertaining and curious mix of social stereotypes, in all their flawed, obsessive, identity-searching glory. Some are idiotic. There are plenty of books about people behind the music. The Lost Tribes of Pop is different: it's a book about the people in front of it. It's the work of a major writing talent, and a must-have for any music fan.

The National Magazine

The National Magazine

The National Magazine


The American Cyclop dia

The American Cyclop  dia

The American Cyclop dia


The American Cyclopaedia

The American Cyclopaedia

The American Cyclopaedia


The Ashgate Research Companion to Popular Musicology

The Ashgate Research Companion to Popular Musicology

The Ashgate Research Companion to Popular Musicology

The research presented in this volume is very recent, and the general approach is that of rethinking popular musicology: its purpose, its aims, and its methods. Contributors to the volume were asked to write something original and, at the same time, to provide an instructive example of a particular way of working and thinking. The essays have been written with a view to helping graduate students with research methodology and the application of relevant theoretical models. The team of contributors is an exceptionally strong one: it contains many of the pre-eminent academic figures involved in popular musicological research, and there is a spread of European, American, Asian, and Australasian scholars. The volume covers seven main themes: Film, Video and Multimedia; Technology and Studio Production; Gender and Sexuality; Identity and Ethnicity; Performance and Gesture; Reception and Scenes and The Music Industry and Globalization. The Ashgate Research Companion is designed to offer scholars and graduate students a comprehensive and authoritative state-of-the-art review of current research in a particular area. The companion's editor brings together a team of respected and experienced experts to write chapters on the key issues in their speciality, providing a comprehensive reference to the field.

Digging Holes in Popular Culture

Digging Holes in Popular Culture

Digging Holes in Popular Culture

What would Howard Carter have thought of Lara Croft? and why do archaeologists feature so prominently in Star Trek? Douglas Adams, author of Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy writes the preface to this unusual collection of papers dedicated to exploring the role of the archaeologist in popular culture. The clichés and stereotypes of archaeology that abound in popular culture, the sense of mystery and adventure, the excitement generated by a dangerous treasure hunt or a thrilling detective story, rarely hint at the monotonous hours spent by modern archaeologists researching in laboratories and libraries and filling out paperwork. Yet the role-models provided by fictional characters such as Dr Who, Indiana Jones, Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Lara Croft have had a powerful influence on how archaeologists and the practices of archaeology are viewed by the general public. At times hilarious, these papers nevertheless address serious cultural issues relevant to archaeology today: colonialism, the indigenous voice, gender roles, objectivity, and ownership of the past.

Pop Can

Pop Can

Pop Can