The Met Office Advises Caution

The Met Office Advises Caution

The Met Office Advises Caution

Rebecca Watts’s debut collection is a witty, warm-hearted guide to the English landscape, and a fresh take on nature poetry. In assured style, Watts positions herself where Wordsworth, Frost and Hughes have stood; with an original point of view and an openness to the possibilities of form, she retunes the genre for modern ears. From the wide-open plains of ecology and social history to the intimate enclosures of dreams, homes and bodies, these poems approach their often-unusual subjects with the clarity and matter-of-factness of Simon Armitage and with humour that recalls Stevie Smith, spinning memorable scenes and vivid images from the material of ordinary language. Animals, as familiars and omens, abound. Weather anticipates and directs human drama, under the analytic and tender watch of a poet influenced as much by science and realism as by Romanticism. As landscaper, orienteer and companion, Watts finds new ways of negotiating the complex territories of our physical and emotional worlds.

Touchstones A Teaching Anthology of Poetry

Touchstones  A Teaching Anthology of Poetry

Touchstones A Teaching Anthology of Poetry

Develop a love for poetry at key stage three with the trusted Touchstones series. This diverse selection of over 150 poems features thought-provoking contemporary voices and much-loved favourites. Touchstones: A Teaching Anthology of Poetry will help you to: · Explain and contextualise poems across a broad range of genres and themes · Support your lessons with over 100 ready-made activities designed for independent, paired and group work · Challenge your students with additional activities specifically designed to stretch their learning · Build the skills required for the poetry element of the latest GCSE English Literature specifications, with chapters dedicated to comparative and unseen poetry · Introduce a range of poets commonly studied at GCSE, from William Wordsworth to Imtiaz Dharker · Introduce a range of contemporary poets, such as Kate Clanchy and Holly McNish, alongside more familiar classics · Support the implementation of the 2014 national curriculum at Key Stage 3

Red Gloves

Red Gloves

Red Gloves

In this follow-up to her acclaimed debut The Met Office Advises Caution, Rebecca Watts observes and tests the limits of humanity's engagement with the non-human. By turns lyrical and narrative, the poems examine familiar subjects - environmental crisis, hawks, hospitals, the sea, barbecues, flowers, Emily Dickinson - only to find their subjects staring, sometimes fighting, back. Nature and nurture, equally red in tooth and claw, power a book-long sparring match between the overthinking poet and the ever-thoughtless universe, between the craft's isolation and the world's irrepressible variety. Gloves on and gloves off, the poet's hands destroy and build, gather and scatter, caress and strike.

History of the Meteorological Office

History of the Meteorological Office

History of the Meteorological Office

Malcolm Walker tells the story of the UK's national meteorological service from its formation in 1854 with a staff of four to its present position as a scientific and technological institution of national and international importance with a staff of nearly two thousand. The Met Office has long been at the forefront of research into atmospheric science and technology and is second to none in providing weather services to the general public and a wide range of customers around the world. The history of the Met Office is therefore largely a history of the development of international weather prediction research in general. In the modern era it is also at the forefront of the modelling of climate change. This volume will be of great interest to meteorologists, atmospheric scientists and historians of science, as well as amateur meteorologists and anyone interested generally in weather prediction.

Science in the Met Office

Science in the Met Office

Science in the Met Office

The Met Office currently operates as a Trading Fund within the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS). The Committee welcomes the move to BIS, particularly given the potential for closer links with the research base and the opportunity to develop further its commercial activities. Core services though for the public service must be maintained. The Met Office generates a significant proportion of its revenues from Government contracts and Customer Service Agreements, in addition to its' commercial services and the Government should provide clearly defined funding commitments. This would allow the Met Office to take a longer-term perspective on scientific and operational development. The Government has no plans to privatise the Met Office, which the Committee saw as putting at risk the strong partnerships built with international partners and the sharing of crucial meteorological data. Also the Committee welcomes the Government's initiative of Public Data Corporation. Some concern though is expressed that scientific advances in weather forecasting and the associated public benefits (particularly in regard to severe weather warnings) are available but are being held back by insufficient supercomputing capacity. The Met Office should attempt to streamline the scrutiny of science under one committee and develop a strong customer relationship with key government departments.

Very British Weather

Very British Weather

Very British Weather

UPGRADE YOUR SMALL TALK GUIDED BY WORLD-LEADING WEATHER EXPERTS! From Foggy and Freezing to Scorching and Stormy, join the ultimate weather adventure through the great British seasons and uncover the extraordinary in every single day*. Are YOU the ultimate weather watcher? Do you know your drizzle from your mizzle? Ever wondered what rainbows are really made of? And could you pinpoint where lightning has struck twice? Pore over beautiful cloudscapes, learn the secrets of sunsets, discover freak weather and fogbows, and why forecasting was so important in British history, from D-Day to the Great Fire of London. Perfect for rainy days in or cloudspotting on the go, the Met Office share the best of almost 170 years of forecasting for the first time in this beautifully illustrated book. Packed with mythbusting, top trivia, stunning visuals and archive gems, shooting the breeze has never been so interesting! *Even when it is tipping it down.

This is the Met Office

This is the Met  Office

This is the Met Office