The Montessori Method

The Montessori Method

The Montessori Method

Provides information on the life and work of Maria Montessori along with an abridged and annotated edition of "The Montessori Method."

Terrific Women Teachers

Terrific Women Teachers

Terrific Women Teachers

Each chapter includes photographs, sidebars and fascinating facts about these groundbreaking women: Maria Montessori, founder of the Montessori method of self-directed learning Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan, Helen's "miracle worker" Christa McAuliffe, high school teacher who died in the space shuttle Challenger disaster Dorval Onesime, a Native Metis educator in the early 1900s from Saskatchewan Denise Fruchter, a special education teacher with tourettes syndrome from Toronto Malalai Joya, campaigning for girlsÕ education in Afghanistan‰Û¬Erin Gurswell, founder of Freedom Writers USA Raden Ayu Kartini, campaigned for the education of women in Indonesia Marva Collins, African American teacher dedicated to improving schools in US cities

Colors

Colors

Colors

Introducing Montessori-inspired early childhood activity books! This book--with eight pages of stickers--does more than simply stimulate learning through play: it enhances the cognitive development of the child. The activities become progressively more complex according to the three stages of a child's learning: getting to know the material through sensory experience, recognizing the material, and being able to explain the material. Let's learn to color! Take the outlined shapes and fill them in, try to stay within the lines, and say the name of each color out loud as you draw. It's lots of fun.

The Playmate and Other Stories

The Playmate and Other Stories

The Playmate and Other Stories

Dorothy Canfield Fisher (1879-1958) who sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Stanley Cranshaw was an educational reformer, social activist, and best-selling American author in the early decades of the twentieth century. Dorothy Canfield brought the Montessori method of child rearing to the United States, presided over the country's first adult education program, and shaped literary tastes by serving as a member of the Book-of-the-Month Club selection committee from 1925 to 1951. Her best-known work today is probably Understood Betsy (1917), a children's book about a little orphaned girl who is sent to live with her cousins in Vermont. Though the book can be read purely for pleasure, it also describes a schoolhouse which is run much in the style of the Montessori method, for which Canfield was one of the first and most vocal advocates. In 1899 Dorothy Canfield received a B. A. from Ohio State University. Canfield went on to study Romance languages at Columbia University, and in 1904 was one of the few women of her generation to receive a doctoral degree. Amongst her other works are: The Bent Twig (1915), Hillsboro People (1915), and The Brimming Cup (1921).

Montessori from the Start

Montessori from the Start

Montessori from the Start

A guide for parents with children up to the age of three explains how to apply the Montessori method of hands-on learning and self-discovery to infants and toddlers, providing advice on such areas as designing a baby's bedroom, utilizing child-sized furniture, and teaching introductory skills including dressing and toilet training. Original. 20,000 first printing.

The Advanced Montessori Method Volume 1

The Advanced Montessori Method Volume 1

The Advanced Montessori Method Volume 1

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1917 edition. Excerpt: ... to build; but when it does not elaborate from reality and truth, instead of raising a divine structure it forms incrustations which compress the intelligence and prevent the light from penetrating thereto. How much time and strength man has lost and is losing by this error! Just as vice, which is an exercise of function without purpose, wastes the body until it becomes diseased, so imagination unsustained by truth consumes the intelligence until it assumes characteristics akin to the mental characteristics of the insane. Fable and religion.-- I have frequently heard it said that the education of the imagination on a basis of fancy prepares the soul of the child for religious education; and that an education based on "reality," as in this method we would adopt, is too arid, and tends to dry up the founts of spiritual life. Such reasoning, however, will not be accepted by religious persons. They know well that faith and fable are " as the poles apart," since fable is in itself a thing without faith, and faith is the very sentiment of truth, which should accompany man even unto death. Religion is not a product of fantastic imagination, it is the greatest of realities, the one truth to the religious man. It is the fount and basis of his life. The man without religion is not, certainly, a person without imagination, but rather one who lacks internal equilibrium; compared with the religious man he is less calm, less strong in adversity; not only this, but he is more unsettled in his own ideas. He is weaker and more unhappy; and it is in vain that he catches at imagination to create a world for himself outside reality. Something within him cries aloud in the words of David: "My soul is athirst for God." And if he hopes to reach the goal of his...

How to Raise an Amazing Child the Montessori Way

How to Raise an Amazing Child the Montessori Way

How to Raise an Amazing Child the Montessori Way

"A parent's guide to building creativity, confidence, and independence"--Cover.