The Notion of Relevance in Information Science

The Notion of Relevance in Information Science

The Notion of Relevance in Information Science

Everybody knows what relevance is. It is a "ya'know" notion, concept, idea–no need to explain whatsoever. Searching for relevant information using information technology (IT) became a ubiquitous activity in contemporary information society. Relevant information means information that pertains to the matter or problem at hand—it is directly connected with effective communication. The purpose of this book is to trace the evolution and with it the history of thinking and research on relevance in information science and related fields from the human point of view. The objective is to synthesize what we have learned about relevance in several decades of investigation about the notion in information science. This book deals with how people deal with relevance—it does not cover how systems deal with relevance; it does not deal with algorithms. Spurred by advances in information retrieval (IR) and information systems of various kinds in handling of relevance, a number of basic questions are raised: But what is relevance to start with? What are some of its properties and manifestations? How do people treat relevance? What affects relevance assessments? What are the effects of inconsistent human relevance judgments on tests of relative performance of different IR algorithms or approaches? These general questions are discussed in detail.

Readings in Information Retrieval

Readings in Information Retrieval

Readings in Information Retrieval

This compilation of original papers on information retrieval presents an overview, covering both general theory and specific methods, of the development and current status of information retrieval systems. Each chapter contains several papers carefully chosen to represent substantive research work that has been carried out in that area, each is preceded by an introductory overview and followed by supported references for further reading.

Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science

Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science

Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science

Vols. 1, 3-4, 6 are proceedings of the Society's 27th, 29th, 30th, 32nd annual meeting.

Critical Theory for Library and Information Science

Critical Theory for Library and Information Science

Critical Theory for Library and Information Science

This text provides an overview of major critical theorists from across disciplines—including the humanities, social sciences, and education—that discusses the importance of these critical perspectives for the advancement of LIS research and scholarship. * A basic bibliography of the theorist's work follows each topic presentation; some chapters also include works of critical commentary on the theorist's writings * Indexes of key terms and concepts are provided throughout the chapters

Historical Studies in Information Science

Historical Studies in Information Science

Historical Studies in Information Science

The field of information science has a broad history spanning nearly a century. "Historical Studies in Information Science focuses on the progression of this dynamic and evolving industry by looking at some of its pioneers. This informative volume concentrates on the following areas: Historiography of Information Science; Paul Otlet and His Successors; Techniques, Tools, and Systems; People and Organizations; Theoretical Topics; and Literature.

Philosophy of User Education

Philosophy of User Education

Philosophy of User Education