Lives of the Presidents Told in Words of One Syllable

Lives of the Presidents Told in Words of One Syllable

Lives of the Presidents Told in Words of One Syllable

"Lives of the Presidents Told in Words of One Syllable" by Jean S. Remy. Published by Good Press. Good Press publishes a wide range of titles that encompasses every genre. From well-known classics & literary fiction and non-fiction to forgotten−or yet undiscovered gems−of world literature, we issue the books that need to be read. Each Good Press edition has been meticulously edited and formatted to boost readability for all e-readers and devices. Our goal is to produce eBooks that are user-friendly and accessible to everyone in a high-quality digital format.

All the Presidents Children

All the Presidents  Children

All the Presidents Children

Examines the lives of the offspring of the nation's chief executives, discussing such topics as their accomplishments, the tragedies that have affected them, and the impact of their fathers' legacies on their own lives.

Farewell to the Chief

Farewell to the Chief

Farewell to the Chief

A collection of biographical sketches that chronicle the lives of 14 presidents from Theodore Roosevelt to Jimmy Carter after they left office.

I Am a Secret Service Agent

I Am a Secret Service Agent

I Am a Secret Service Agent

Dan Emmett was just eight years old when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. From that moment forward, he knew he wanted to become a Secret Service agent, one of an elite group of highly trained men and women dedicated to preserving the life of the President of the United States at any cost, including sacrificing their own lives if necessary. Armed with single-minded determination and a never-quit attitude, he did just that. Selected over thousands of other highly qualified applicants to become an agent, he was eventually chosen to be one of the best of the best and provided protection worldwide for Presidents George Herbert Walker Bush, William Jefferson Clinton, and George W. Bush. I Am a Secret Service Agent skillfully describes the duties and challenges of conducting presidential advances, dealing with the media, driving the President in a bullet-proof limousine, running alongside him through the streets of Washington, and flying with him on Air Force One. With fascinating anecdotes, Emmett weaves keen insight into the unique culture and history of the Secret Service with the inner workings of the White House. I Am A Secret Service Agent is a must read for young adults interested in a career in federal law enforcement.

LIFE

LIFE

LIFE

LIFE Magazine is the treasured photographic magazine that chronicled the 20th Century. It now lives on at LIFE.com, the largest, most amazing collection of professional photography on the internet. Users can browse, search and view photos of today’s people and events. They have free access to share, print and post images for personal use.

When Life Strikes the President

When Life Strikes the President

When Life Strikes the President

What happens when life, so to speak, strikes the President of the United States? How do presidents and their families cope with illness, personal loss, and scandal, and how have such personal crises affected a president's ability to lead, shaped presidential decision-making in critical moments, and perhaps even altered the course of events? In asking such questions, the essays in this volume -- written by twelve leading scholars noted for their expertise on their respective subjects -- reveal alternately the frailty, the humanity, and the strength of character of some of America's most controversial presidents. Three of them deal with the death of children--the impact of the loss of a young son on Franklin Pierce, Abraham Lincoln, and Calvin Coolidge. Another shows how, when his father suffered a stroke, John F. Kennedy lost his most important adviser as the crisis in Cuba loomed. Three essays tell stories about notorious, self-inflicted scandals during the presidencies of Andrew Jackson, Richard Nixon, and Bill Clinton. Several of them focus on the effects of disability or illness in the Oval Office -- on Woodrow Wilson's stroke at the end of World War I; Franklin Roosevelt's paralysis while leading the country through the Great Depression and World War II; Ronald Reagan's struggles and changed priorities in the wake of an assassination attempt; and the bearing of depression and personality disorders of one kind or another on the actions Jackson, John Tyler, Lyndon Johnson, and Richard Nixon during their crucial years in office. While illuminating a considerable span of American history and providing new and significant analyses of American politics and foreign policy, these fascinating essays remind us about the personal side of presidential leadership, and that tomorrow is promised to no one.

Life in the White House

Life in the White House

Life in the White House

Interdisciplinary essays on the White House and the lives of first families.

Life of James Buchanan

Life of James Buchanan

Life of James Buchanan


THE PRESIDENT FOR LIFE PANDEMIC IN AFRICA

THE PRESIDENT FOR LIFE PANDEMIC IN AFRICA

THE PRESIDENT FOR LIFE PANDEMIC IN AFRICA

Dictatorship, contrary to the general belief, is not an African invention. The history of this practice dates back to the Roman Empire where the "e;extraordinary magistrate"e; and the "e;ordinary magistrate"e; wielded uncontrolled power in society. Sadly, post-colonial Africa is replete with examples of African leaders who subsequently adopted the dictatorial approach to governance after independence, almost becoming law unto themselves. Consequently, the 'president for life' phenomenon has invariably become one of the defining features of the African continent - even in the modern era of democracy. Some African leaders assume positions of power and then use state institutions to prolong their stay in office against the wishes of the people and contrary to constitutional imperatives. This book was inspired by the general trend in Africa where an increasing number of African leaders refuse or only grudgingly agree to vacate their positions as presidents when their term of office expires. The key question addressed in the book is: why do African leaders hold on to power beyond their constitutional mandate? The book distinguishes between the first and second generation of African leaders and argues that each generation has its reasons for clinging on to power. It argues that while many of the first generation leaders stayed beyond their constitutional mandate out of a sense of entitlement for leading the independence struggles, the second generation of leaders were mostly animated by greed and insecurity.Using five countries as case studies - Kenya, Zimbabwe, Nigeria, Zambia and Malawi - the book demonstrates the frequency of this tendency and highlights its impacts on the countries in question.