Particles and Projections in Irish Syntax

Particles and Projections in Irish Syntax

Particles and Projections in Irish Syntax

Chapter 5: Irish Noun Phrases ... ... . . 266 5. 0 Introduction 266 5. 0. 1 Irish Nominal Paradigms. ... ... 269 5. 0. 2 Prepositional Phrases: Two Types of Mutation Context ... ... ... 273 5. 1 Construct State Nominals and DP Projections. ... 282 5. 1. 1 Rightward Specifiers 286 5. 1. 2 Adjective Placement. ... ... 288 5. 1. 3 Possessive Particles 305 5. 1. 4 Demonstrative Licensing and Interpretation. ... . 311 5. 1. 5 Head-movement and ICM Effects 315 5. 2 Summary 322 Appendix ... ... ... ... 323 References 342 Index of Names and Subjects 359 PREFACE This bookis based on my 1991 USCdissertation. Since thattime, there have been two major theoretical developments that bear directly on the analysesoriginallydevelopedin the dissertation. These aretheinceptionof the 'Minimalist Program' of Chomsky (1992, 1993), and the recent 'Antisymmetry' proposals presented in Kayne (1993). Taken in conjunction with the many criticisms and suggestions ofreviewers, these proposals have prompted significant revisions ofthe earlier work:. Every chapter has been substantially revised, the introductory chapter has been replaced, and Chapters 2, 3 and 5 offer completely new analyses of the originalmaterial. The book comprises a set of theoretical studies of aspects of Modern Irish syntax. I have tried to present a coherent and consistent treatmentof the Irishfacts; abookin which the particularsofIrish syntax- which are in many cases quiteeccentric from an Englishperspective- are shown to inform more general theoreticalissues. I also hope to have offered to the non-Celticist a reasonably complete overview of the major syntactic structures ofIrish, with some indication and analysisofthe more importantdialectdifferences.

Endocentric Structuring of Projection free Syntax

Endocentric Structuring of Projection free Syntax

Endocentric Structuring of Projection free Syntax

Endocentric Structuring of Projection-free Syntax puts forward a novel theory of syntax that rigidly adheres to the principle of Minimal Computation, in which a number of traditional but extraneous stipulations such as referential indices and representational labels/projections are eliminated. It specifically articulates the overarching hypothesis that every syntactic object is composed by recursive, phase-by-phase embedding of the endocentric structure {H, α}, where H is a head lexical item and α is another syntactic object (order irrelevant). The proposed mechanism achieves both theory-internal simplicity and broad empirical coverage at the same time, advancing a radically reduced conception of endocentricty/headedness while deriving a number of empirically grounded constraints on human language.

Theory of Projection in Syntax

Theory of Projection in Syntax

Theory of Projection in Syntax

The book proposes a theory of phrase structure in which structures are built by a simple adjunction operation, and specifiers are solely characterised by agreement. Having introduced some of the basic notions of the principle-and-parameters theory in Chapter 1, Chapter 2 discusses and illustrates the fundamental difference between lexical and functional categories: Lexical categories have Lexical Conceptual Structure in the sense of Hale and Keyser (1986), whereas functional categories lack such intrinsic semantic property. Instead, functional categories possess agreement features which connect two distinct syntactic categories. Based on this fundamental difference, a new system of projection called the relativized X-bar theory is introduced. Chapter 3 explores various consequences of the projection system introduced in Chapter 2. In Chapter 4, the discussion focuses on the phrase structural properties of Japanese.

Investigations of the Syntax semantics pragmatics Interface

Investigations of the Syntax semantics pragmatics Interface

Investigations of the Syntax semantics pragmatics Interface

Investigations of the Syntax-Semantics-Pragmatics Interface presents on-going research in Role and Reference Grammar in a number of critical areas of linguistic theory: verb semantics and argument structure, the nature of syntactic categories and syntactic representation, prosody and syntax, information structure and syntax, and the syntax and semantics of complex sentences. In each of these areas there are important results which not only advance the development of the theory, but also contribute to the broader theoretical discussion. In particular, there are analyses of grammatical phenomena such as transitivity in Kabardian, the verb-less numeral quantifier construction in Japanese, and an unusual kind of complex sentence in Wari' (Chapakuran, Brazil) which not only illustrate the descriptive and explanatory power of the theory, but also present interesting challenges to other approaches. In addition, there are papers looking at the implications and applications of Role and Reference Grammar for neurolinguistic research, parsing and automated text analysis.

The Syntax of Reflexivization

The Syntax of Reflexivization

The Syntax of Reflexivization


The Syntax of Negation

The Syntax of Negation

The Syntax of Negation

Demonstrates sentential negation within a Government and Binding framework, showing parallelism between negative and interrogative sentences.

The Syntax of Tenselessness

The Syntax of Tenselessness

The Syntax of Tenselessness

Tense/Mood/Aspect-agreeing Infinitivals is an in-depth investigation of the syntax of verb-verb agreement phenomena in Swedish, including pseudocoordinations of the form John started and wrote 'John started writing' and double participles of the form John had been-able written 'John had been able to write'. Providing evidence from facts concerning extraction, locality, selection, and interpretation, the book argues that the relevant construction types all involve surface variants of "infinitives in disguise"; infinitivals that agree with the matrix clause in tense/mood/aspect. Arguments are presented in favour of taking the dependencies underlying the agreement to be instances of Agree between functional heads of the same label, a configuration that yields restructuring/clause-union. The main theoretical contributions of the book are two: (i) Agreement is proportional to functional structure: The possibility of "copying" a particular morphosyntactic form is contingent on the presence of the corresponding functional projection in the agreeing XP. (ii) Size constancy between restructuring/non-restructuring infinitivals: The category selected by a verb may remain constant between restructuring and non-restructuring configurations. It is suggested that an important aspect of restructuring may be alternation between unmarked (negatively specified) features and unvalued varieties of the same features, capturing properties such as "tenselessness", "finitelessness", etc. of restructuring infinitivals. The book is an important contribution to the syntax of infinitival clauses, the syntax of clause-union/restructuring, and more generally to the syntax of agreement phenomena in natural language. In addition, it provides a general reference source for anyone interested in the syntax of Swedish and other Scandinavian languages.