The Truth about Crime

The Truth about Crime

The Truth about Crime

This new book by the well-known anthropologists Jean and John L. Comaroff explores the global preoccupation with criminality in the early twenty-first century, a preoccupation strikingly disproportionate, in most places and for most people, to the risks posed by lawlessness to the conduct of everyday life. Ours in an epoch in which law-making, law-breaking, and law-enforcement are ever more critical registers in which societies construct, contest, and confront truths about themselves, an epoch in which criminology, broadly defined, has displaced sociology as the privileged means by which the social world knows itself. They also argue that as the result of a tectonic shift in the triangulation of capital, the state, and governance, the meanings attached to crime and, with it, the nature of policing, have undergone significant change; also, that there has been a palpable muddying of the lines between legality and illegality, between corruption and conventional business; even between crime-and-policing, which exist, nowadays, in ever greater, hyphenated complicity. Thinking through Crime and Policing is, therefore, an excursion into the contemporary Order of Things; or, rather, into the metaphysic of disorder that saturates the late modern world, indeed, has become its leitmotif. It is also a meditation on sovereignty and citizenship, on civility, class, and race, on the law and its transgression, on the political economy of representation.

Finding the Truth with Criminal Investigation

Finding the Truth with Criminal Investigation

Finding the Truth with Criminal Investigation

Finding the Truth with Criminal Investigation is a comprehensive summary which covers a wide range of investigative responsibilities, all of which are regularly tasked when teaching, or training, future law enforcement personnel.

The Truth Machines

The Truth Machines

The Truth Machines

"Using case studies and the results of extensive fieldwork, this book considers the nature of state power and legal violence in liberal democracies by focusing on the interaction between law, science, and policing in India. The postcolonial Indian police have often been accused of using torture in both routine and exceptional criminal cases, but they, and forensic psychologists, have claimed that lie detectors, brain scans, and narcoanalysis (the use of "truth serum," Sodium Pentothal) represent a paradigm shift away from physical torture; most state high courts in India have upheld this rationale. The Truth Machines examines the emergence and use of these three scientific techniques to analyze two primary themes. First, the book questions whether existing theoretical frameworks for understanding state power and legal violence are adequate to explain constant innovations of the state. Second, it explores the workings of law, science, and policing in the everyday context to generate a theory of state power and legal violence, challenging the monolithic frameworks about this relationship, based on a study of both state and non-state actors. Jinee Lokaneeta argues that the attempt to replace physical torture with truth machines in India fails because it relies on a confessional paradigm that is contiguous with torture. Her work also provides insights into a police institution that is founded and refounded in its everyday interactions between state and non-state actors. Theorizing a concept of Contingent State, this book demonstrates the disaggregated, and decentered nature of state power and legal violence, creating possible sites of critique and intervention"--

Criminal

Criminal

Criminal

The way we see and understand crime falls into two types of story that, in essence, have been told and retold many times throughout human history - in fiction, as in fact. Criminality is either a selfish choice, an aberration; or a forced choice, the product of social factors. These two stories continue to dominate both our views of and responses to crime. And, says Tom Gash, they are completely wrong. In seeking to dispel the myths that surround and inform our views of crime, Criminal argues that our obsession with 'big arguments' about crime's causes can lead us to mistake individual cases as proof of universal rules. How, he asks, can we suspend our knee-jerk reactions, and begin to understand crime for what it is: as a risk that can be managed and reduced.

News Truth and Crime

News  Truth and Crime

News Truth and Crime

Evaluating the Westray mine disaster - a 1992 explosion in a Nova Scotia mine that killed 26 men - this case study explores how news can be distorted and misrepresented in mainstream media. Through a thorough recounting of the tragedy and its media coverage, the author dissects the relationship between power, perspective, and the production of truth. References to the media's favoritism towards the Canadian government and the mine company, bring questions of journalistic integrity and degrees of truth within the media into sharp relief."--pub. desc.

Criminal Investigation

Criminal Investigation

Criminal Investigation

Criminal Investigation, Second Edition has been updated to reflect current police practices and techniques in investigating and assessing crime scenes. This new edition contains more information on DNA and using technology in investigations, as well as a new case law decision dealing with sufficiency of investigative notes, new images dealing with forensic artistry, and an updated section on conducting a photographic lineup. Based on the author's 32-years experience as a police officer and detective, Criminal Investigation represents personal experiences and lessons from some of the finest investigators, coroners, prosecutors, judges, and other justice professionals. Van Allen introduces the groundwork for beginning an investigation in great detail and provides real case examples from a national perspective.

A History of Infamy

A History of Infamy

A History of Infamy

"A History of Infamy explores the broken nexus between crime, justice, and the truth in mid-twentieth-century Mexico. Facing the violence and impunity that defined politics, policing, and the judicial system in post-revolutionary times, Mexicans sought truth and justice outside state institutions. During this time, the criminal news beat and crime fiction flourished. Civil society's search for truth and justice lead, paradoxically, to the normalization of extrajudicial violence and neglect for the rights of victims. As Piccato demonstrates, ordinary people in Mexico have made crime and punishment central concerns of the public sphere during the last century, and in doing so have shaped how crime and violence took form over time"--Provided by publisher.

Crime Scene Investigators

Crime Scene Investigators

Crime Scene Investigators

"Describes crime scene investigators, including what they do and how they help catch criminals"--Provided by publisher.