The World in the Model

The World in the Model

The World in the Model

Describes the radical shift in the study of economic science; where arguing with words was replaced by reasoning with mathematical models.

Simulation and Similarity

Simulation and Similarity

Simulation and Similarity

This book is an account of modeling and idealization in modern scientific practice, focusing on concrete, mathematical, and computational models. The main topics of this book are the nature of models, the practice of modeling, and the nature of the relationship between models and real-world phenomena. In order to elucidate the model/world relationship, Weisberg develops a novel account of similarity called weighted feature matching.

Why Did Europe Conquer the World

Why Did Europe Conquer the World

Why Did Europe Conquer the World

Between 1492 and 1914, Europeans conquered 84 percent of the globe. But why did Europe establish global dominance, when for centuries the Chinese, Japanese, Ottomans, and South Asians were far more advanced? In Why Did Europe Conquer the World?, Philip Hoffman demonstrates that conventional explanations—such as geography, epidemic disease, and the Industrial Revolution—fail to provide answers. Arguing instead for the pivotal role of economic and political history, Hoffman shows that if certain variables had been different, Europe would have been eclipsed, and another power could have become master of the world. Hoffman sheds light on the two millennia of economic, political, and historical changes that set European states on a distinctive path of development, military rivalry, and war. This resulted in astonishingly rapid growth in Europe's military sector, and produced an insurmountable lead in gunpowder technology. The consequences determined which states established colonial empires or ran the slave trade, and even which economies were the first to industrialize. Debunking traditional arguments, Why Did Europe Conquer the World? reveals the startling reasons behind Europe's historic global supremacy.

100 management models

100  management models

100 management models

100+ Management Models is an essential resource for managers at all levels. It gives an overview of each of the most important business models in eight categories: sustainability, innovation, strategy, diversity, customers, human resources, benchmarking and leadership and analyses their strengths and weaknesses.

Enterprise Model Patterns

Enterprise Model Patterns

Enterprise Model Patterns

In 1995, David Hay published "Data Model Patterns: Conventions of Thought" -- the groundbreaking book on how to use standard data models to describe the standard business situations. This book builds on the concepts presented there, adds 15 years of practical experience, and presents a more comprehensive view. You will learn how to apply both the abstract and concrete elements of your enterprise's architectural data model through four levels of abstraction: Level 0: An abstract template that underlies the Level 1 model that follows, plus two meta models; Level 1: An enterprise model that is generic enough to apply to any company or government agency, but concrete enough to be readily understood by all; Level 2: A more detailed model describing specific functional areas; Level 3: Examples of the details a model can have to address what is truly unique in a particular industry.