Three Sheets to the Wind

Three Sheets to the Wind

Three Sheets to the Wind

The origins of a remarkable number of everyday words and phrases are anchored in our seafaring past. Three Sheets to the Wind: The Nautical Origins of Everyday Expressions is an entertaining compilation revealing the maritime roots of common English expressions. The original “slush fund” was the fatty scraps from boiled meat that the ship’s cook secretly stashed away to sell at port to candle makers. The man who originally “turned a blind eye” was Admiral Nelson. In one of Naval history’s most famous acts of insubordination, Nelson, in the heat of battle, raised his telescope to his blind eye and announced he could not see the signal flag commanding him to break off action. The perfect companion for etymology lovers, factophiles, ocean dreamers, and the conversationally curious, Three Sheets to the Wind features 200 words and expressions that are nautically inspired. Alphabetically organized (from A to Sea) readers can also enjoy 100 original illustrations as well as relevant excerpts from the great novels of Melville, Forester, O’Brian, and others. These passages illustrate how such literary giants reached for these expressions in their classic masterpieces. Our everyday speech is peppered with language used by sailors when someone says they are “pooped” because they stayed to the “bitter end” of “happy hour”.

Three Sheets To The Wind

Three Sheets To The Wind

Three Sheets To The Wind

Meet Pete Brown: beer jounalist, beer drinker and author of an irreverent book about British beer, Man Walks Into A Pub. One day, Pete's world is rocked when he discovers several countries produce, consume and celebrate beer far more than we do. The Germans claim they make the best beer in the world, the Australians consider its consumption a patriotic duty, the Spanish regard lager as a trendy youth drink and the Japanese have built a skyscrapter in the shape of a foaming glass of their favourite brew. At home, meanwhile, people seem to be turning their back on the great British pint. What's going on? Obviously, the only way to find out was to on the biggest pub crawl ever. Drinking in more than three hundred bars, in twenty-seven towns, in thirteen different countries, on four different continents, Pete puts on a stone in weight and does irrecoverable damage to his health in the pursuit of saloon-bar enlightenment. 'A fine book. . . the exact tone that a work on this social drug requires.' The Times 'Over 300 bars later and the man still manages to make you laugh.' Daily Mirror 'Carlsberg don't publish books. But if they did, they would probably come up with Three Sheets to the Wind...' Metro 'A marvellous book which is as enlightening about the countries he visited as any travel guide.' Adventure Magazine

Three Sheets in the Wind

Three Sheets in the Wind

Three Sheets in the Wind

Arriving on a summer weekend at any stretch of water without one's own craft behind the car or swaying proudly at its moorings is like attending a dance with a broken leg - not to mention the damage to one's social status. This is a humorous manual of instruction for sailors anywhere

Three Sheets in the Wind

Three Sheets in the Wind

Three Sheets in the Wind

Arriving on a summer weekend at any stretch of water without one's own craft behind the car or swaying proudly at its moorings is like attending a dance with a broken leg - not to mention the damage to one's social status. This is a humorous manual of instruction for sailors anywhere.

Three Sheets In The Wind

Three Sheets In The Wind

Three Sheets In The Wind

"Three Sheets In The Wind" is a hilarious but dark mystery novel that promises to keep you on the edge of your seat. It is the sequel to "The Cat on Salter's Point." It's been three years since Jamie Lee's tragic death. Salter's Point Regional, known as the nuthouse in the community, continues to attract crazy and peculiar professionals to its ranks. The hospital has thrived, despite its dubious reputation and the many changes over the years. Still struggling with the hospital's daily challenges, Rachel and her colleagues stumbled on another shocking and unnerving revelation.

The Entertainment of a Nation

The Entertainment of a Nation

The Entertainment of a Nation

George Jean Nathan (1882-1958) was formative influence on American letters in the first half of this century, and is generally considered the leading drama critic of his era. With H. L. Mencken, Nathan edited The Smart Set and founded and edited The American Mercury, journals that shaped opinion in the 1920s and 1930s. This series of reprints, individually introduced by the distinguished critic and novelist Charles Angoff, collects Nathan's penetrating, witty, and sometimes cynical drama criticism.

Three Sheets to the Wind

Three Sheets to the Wind

Three Sheets to the Wind

J.J. Klein returns with Jim Slade and Bree Willows. Three Sheets To The Wind is a bundle of surprises. The duo dives deep into the workings of a new government intelligence program. It seems that Slade's long time friend and former Marine, Billy Gordon, is abducted for his access to top secret information. It's not the information they're after, it's the cover-up. Slade and Willows jump into action hunting down the group responsible for the abduction. The deeper they go the dirtier the digital footprint becomes. They soon discover that they're not up against a foreign enemy, but something much worse. Slade pulls in former partners and finds an unlikely ally in a previous enemy. Together, they unravel the web of influence. The team discovers that the US government is three sheets to the wind; drunk on power. Find out what happens as Jim Slade and Bree Willows get to the truth in this fast paced story of deception and power.