Through a Vegan Studies Lens

Through a Vegan Studies Lens

Through a Vegan Studies Lens

"The essays in Doing Vegan Studies are engaged with doing theory differently. This collection showcases established and emerging writers who are doing vegan theory, an international mix of activist scholars, affiliated with the academy and doing work beyond it - a distinction that marks vegan studies as a pedagogy and scholarly venue that is not exclusive and that owes its existence to lived animal rights activism"--Provided by publisher.

The Routledge Handbook of Vegan Studies

The Routledge Handbook of Vegan Studies

The Routledge Handbook of Vegan Studies

This wide-ranging volume explores the tension between the dietary practice of veganism and the manifestation, construction, and representation of a vegan identity in today’s society. Emerging in the early 21st century, vegan studies is distinct from more familiar conceptions of "animal studies," an umbrella term for a three-pronged field that gained prominence in the late 1990s and early 2000s, consisting of critical animal studies, human animal studies, and posthumanism. While veganism is a consideration of these modes of inquiry, it is a decidedly different entity, an ethical delineator that for many scholars marks a complicated boundary between theoretical pursuit and lived experience. The Routledge Handbook of Vegan Studies is the must-have reference for the important topics, problems, and key debates in the subject area and is the first of its kind. Comprising over 30 chapters by a team of international contributors, this handbook is divided into five parts: History of vegan studies Vegan studies in the disciplines Theoretical intersections Contemporary media entanglements Veganism around the world These sections contextualize veganism beyond its status as a dietary choice, situating veganism within broader social, ethical, legal, theoretical, and artistic discourses. This book will be essential reading for students and researchers of vegan studies, animal studies, and environmental ethics.

Cultural Encyclopedia of Vegetarianism

Cultural Encyclopedia of Vegetarianism

Cultural Encyclopedia of Vegetarianism

Intended for students, general readers, vegetarians, and vegans, as well as those interested in animal welfare and liberation, this A–Z encyclopedia explores the historical and cultural significance of vegetarianism in the United States and beyond. * A–Z entries on cultural and historical aspects of vegetarianism in the United States and beyond * Brief sidebars with excerpts from primary documents, quotations, and more * A chronology of vegetarianism in the United States, including relevant international developments * Photographs of famous vegetarians * A selected bibliography of relevant books, scholarly articles, and websites

Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities

Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities

Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities

Although scholars in the environmental humanities have been exploring the dichotomy between "wild" and "built" environments for several years, few have focused on the field of disability studies, a discipline that enlists the contingency between environments and bodies as a foundation of its scholarship. On the other hand, scholars in disability studies have demonstrated the ways in which the built environment privileges some bodies and minds over others, yet they have rarely examined the ways in which toxic environments engender chronic illness and disability or how environmental illnesses disrupt dominant paradigms for scrutinizing "disability." Designed as a reader for undergraduate and graduate courses, Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities employs interdisciplinary perspectives to examine such issues as slow violence, imperialism, race, toxicity, eco-sickness, the body in environmental justice, ableism, and other topics. With a historical scope spanning the seventeenth century to the present, this collection not only presents the foundational documents informing this intersection of fields but also showcases the most current work, making it an indispensable reference.

Vegan Consciousness and the Commodity Chain

Vegan Consciousness and the Commodity Chain

Vegan Consciousness and the Commodity Chain

In this dissertation, I analyze how neoliberal whiteness, race consciousness, decolonization, and anti-racism operate within three different vegan food guides: PETA's Vegan Shopping Guide, Queen Afua's Sacred Woman, and Food Empowerment Project's Ethical Food Choices. PETA, Queen Afua, and Food Empowerment Project are all located within the landscape of vegan politics to produce "ethical" spaces across multiple scales (i.e. consciousness, the body and the home). However, these three sites represent different engagements with food commodities for achieving ethical consumption. Such differences are not so much about food, as much as they are about the social, political, and economic relationships underlying the food commodity chain. This manuscript will reveal that these `differing' vegan guides, actually effect and are affected by whiteness; both in its historical (i.e. colonial whiteness and Jim Crow segregation) and contemporary forms (i.e. neoliberal whiteness). These connections will be revealed and articulated through the primary framework of critical race materialism and the lens of critical food studies. Chapter two is titled "'Never Be Silent': On Trayvon Martin, PETA and the Packaging of Neoliberal Whiteness". Vegan tomato products and So Delicious® are advocated as "cruelty-free" in PETA's online Vegan Shopping Guide. I will engage critical race materialist and decolonial analysis of the meanings PETA has applied to these two commodities. Such analysis will reveal how PETA's marketing of vegan products, as "cruelty-free," conceals human exploitation that makes these foods possible. I also show how PETA's `anti-racist' use of Trayvon Martin's 2012 murder for their new campaign, signify how both post-humanism and post-racialism work to conceal the violence of neoliberalism and racism. Chapter three is titled, "Feed a Wom[b]man, Feed the Black Nation: Afrocentric Vegan Politics and Queen Afua's Kitchen." Queen Afua is one of the most popular and widely read health activists amongst Black women in the USA. In this chapter, I analyze the food that Sacred Woman recommends or abhors to `purify', `decolonize,' and `liberate' Black Americans from legacies of colonialism and racism. First, through an Afrocentric framework, I show how Afua's vegan philosophy resists anti-black conceptualizations of Black women as "unfeminine" and "breeders." After this analysis, I use Black feminist theorizing to explore how the meanings Afua places on particular vegan commodities simultaneously reproduces heterosexist, ableist, and black middle-class `reformist' conceptualizations of a `healthy' Black nation.Lastly chapter four is named "Food Empowerment Project and the Underside of Veganized Modernity." Food Empowerment Project (FEP) is a pro-vegan food justice organization in South Bay California. They place great emphasis on farmworker rights and alleviating environmental racism. I show that their Ethical Food Choices guide exposes how neoliberalism, corporate-capitalist profits, and hyper-consumerism dictate "ethical" vegan marketing schemes and labels such as "sustainable," "ethically sourced," and "Fair Trade." They achieve this by re-signifying the neoliberal meaning of `sustainable' palm oil products and cocoa, to reflect the cruel and unethical conditions they create. Analysis of FEP's boycott of popular `eco-conscious' and `sustainable' labeled vegan brands Earth Balance® and CLIF Bar® will be undertaken. Ultimately, this dissertation articulates how something as `mundane' as vegan food guides can be used to create new critical literacies around ethical consumption and racial dynamics, as well as reveal how neoliberal whiteness operates within the food commodity chain.

The Pig in Thin Air

The Pig in Thin Air

The Pig in Thin Air

In this searing, honest account of how he came to terms with his destructive habits and changed his relationship with his own body, Alex Lockwood writer, educator, and activist working in the fields of literature, creative writing, media, and the environment critically explores the relationship of the body to animal activism. Looking at academic scholarship and animal advocacy organizations, Lockwood explores the dimensions of embodiment from his own body to those of the animals he bears witness to, from bodies of knowledge and those who place themselves in the way of the machinery of death, through to our physical efforts to make sense of a world where so much is desensitized, disembodied, and fragmented. In exploring different modes of activism throughout North America, The Pig in Thin Air asks how animal advocacy and environmental activism can best join forces to tackle these interconnected crises in such a way that we might develop deeper, more authentic compassionate relationships with all other animals, including ourselves. The {bio}graphies series explores the relationships between human and nonhuman animals through scholarship in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences viewed through the lens of autobiography and memoir, to deepen and complicate our perspectives on the other beings with whom we share the planet. "

The End of Animal Farming

The End of Animal Farming

The End of Animal Farming

A bold yet realistic vision of how technology and social change are creating a food system in which we no longer use animals to produce meat, dairy, or eggs Michael Pollan's The Omnivore's Dilemma and Jonathan Safran Foer's Eating Animals brought widespread attention to the disturbing realities of factory farming. The End of Animal Farming pushes this conversation forward by outlining a strategic roadmap to a humane, ethical, and efficient food system in which slaughterhouses are obsolete--where the tastes of even the most die-hard meat eater are satisfied by innovative food technologies like cultured meats and plant-based protein. Social scientist and animal advocate Jacy Reese analyzes the social forces leading us toward the downfall of animal agriculture, the technology making this change possible for the meat-hungry public, and the activism driving consumer demand for plant-based and cultured foods. Reese contextualizes the issue of factory farming--the inhumane system of industrial farming that 95 percent of farmed animals endure--as part of humanity's expanding moral circle. Humanity increasingly treats nonhuman animals, from household pets to orca whales, with respect and kindness, and Reese argues that farmed animals are the next step. Reese applies an analytical lens of "effective altruism," the burgeoning philosophy of using evidence-based research to maximize one's positive impact in the world, in order to better understand which strategies can help expand the moral circle now and in the future. The End of Animal Farming is not a scolding treatise or a prescription for an ascetic diet. Reese invites readers--vegan and non-vegan--to consider one of the most important and transformational social movements of the coming decades.

The Utne Reader

The Utne Reader

The Utne Reader