Through Amateur Eyes

Through Amateur Eyes

Through Amateur Eyes

A history of rare archival amateur photographs and films from Nazi Germany

Amateur Cinema

Amateur Cinema

Amateur Cinema

From the very beginning of cinema, there have been amateur filmmakers at work. It wasn’t until Kodak introduced 16mm film in 1923, however, that amateur moviemaking became a widespread reality, and by the 1950s, over a million Americans had amateur movie cameras. In Amateur Cinema, Charles Tepperman explores the meaning of the “amateur” in film history and modern visual culture. In the middle decades of the twentieth century—the period that saw Hollywood’s rise to dominance in the global film industry—a movement of amateur filmmakers created an alternative world of small-scale movie production and circulation. Organized amateur moviemaking was a significant phenomenon that gave rise to dozens of clubs and thousands of participants producing experimental, nonfiction, or short-subject narratives. Rooted in an examination of surviving films, this book traces the contexts of “advanced” amateur cinema and articulates the broad aesthetic and stylistic tendencies of amateur films.

Through Indian Eyes

Through Indian Eyes

Through Indian Eyes

A narrative history of photography in India of the nineteenth and early twentieth century is illustrated with scenes of village life, students, merchants, rajas, and holy men, taken by indigenous artists

Through African Eyes

Through African Eyes

Through African Eyes

Survey African cinema through candid, revealing conversations with twenty of its most original and celebrated filmmakers. From the pioneers in the industry to the emerging generation, they are all bonded by their need to tell stories, to shed light on African realities, and to shape the future images of the continent. Having been in the unique position of charting the development of African cinema for the past decade, the African Film Festival is pleased to present this important anthology.

The Microscope

The Microscope

The Microscope


Egypt Through the Eyes of Travellers

Egypt Through the Eyes of Travellers

Egypt Through the Eyes of Travellers

This is the final volume of three books containing papers from the ASTENE conference at Cambridge in 1999. The theme of this title is the 18th and 19th Century European fascination with Egypt. This interest had begun during the Enlightenment and was fuelled by the invasion of Egypt by Napoleon in 1798. For many Europeans of this age, Egypt represented all the exoticism, sensuality and mystery of the Orient, and these nine papers (one of which is in French) seek to explore this relationship. Contents: A public pageant in 1806: Lord Valentia visits Egypt (Deborah Manley); Berths under the Highest Stars: Henry William Beechey in Egypt 1816-1819 (Patricia Usick); Florence Nightingale's Letters from Egypt (Loubna Youssef); Preparing to be an Egyptologist: Amelia Edwards before 1873 (Joan Rees); Rameses III, Giovanni Belzoni and the Mysterious Reverend Browne (Penelope Wilson); A House, a museum and a legend: Bait al-Kretliya (The Gayer-Anderson Mummy) (Iain Gordon Brown); Silent travellers, articulate mummies: 'Mummy Pettigrew' and the Discourse of the Dead (Sahar Sobhi Abdel-Hakim); Les detours fictionnels du recit de voyage: Le Nil, Egypte et Nubie de Maxime du Camp (Veronique Magri-Mourges).