Two Faiths One Covenant

Two Faiths  One Covenant

Two Faiths One Covenant

In the twenty-first century, Jews and Christians are challenged to reconsider their theological assumptions by two inescapable truths: the moral tragedy of the holocaust demands that Christian thinkers acknowledge the violent effects of theologically delegitimizing Jews and Judaism, and the pervasive reality of cultural and religious pluralism calls both Christian and Jewish theologians to rethink the covenant in the presence of the Other. Two Faiths, One Covenant? Jewish and Christian Identity in the Presence of the Other is a breakthrough work that embraces this contemporary challenge and charts a path toward fruitful interfaith dialogue. The Christian and Jewish theologians in this book explore the ways that both religions have understood the covenant and reflect on how it can serve as a reservoir for a positive theological relationship between Christianity and Judaism-not merely one of non-belligerent tolerance, but of respect and theological pluralism, however limited.

Two Faiths One Covenant

Two Faiths  One Covenant

Two Faiths One Covenant

Judaism and Christianity are religions bound together by their claims to the same biblical covenant initiated by God with Abraham and his descendants. Yet, despite the inseparable connection between the election of Israel and that of the church, between the "old" and the "new" covenant, this shared spiritual patrimony has been the source of a type of violent sibling rivalry competing for the same paternal love and inherited entitlement. God, it seemed, had but one blessing to bestow. It could be given to either Jacob or Esau—but not both. In the twenty-first century, however, Jews and Christians are challenged to reconsider their theological assumptions by two inescapable truths: the moral tragedy of the holocaust demands that Christian thinkers acknowledge the violent effects of theologically de-legitimizing Jews and Judaism, and the pervasive reality of cultural and religious pluralism calls both Christian and Jewish theologians to rethink the covenant in the presence of the Other. Two Faiths, One Covenant? Jewish and Christian Identity in the Presence of the Other is a breakthrough work that embraces this contemporary challenge and charts a path toward fruitful interfaith dialogue. The Christian and Jewish theologians in this book explore the ways that both religions have understood the covenant in biblical, rabbinic, medieval, and modern religious writings and reflect on how the covenant can serve as a reservoir for a positive theological relationship between Christianity and Judaism—not merely one of non-belligerent tolerance, but of respect and theological pluralism, however limited.

Many Religions One Covenant

Many Religions  One Covenant

Many Religions One Covenant

In Many Religions, One Covenant, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger spans the deep divides in modern Catholic scholarship to present a compelling biblical theology, modern in its concerns yet classical in its breadth. It is his classical mastery, his ressourcement, that enables the Cardinal to build a bridge. Cardinal Ratzinger seeks to deepen our understanding of the Bible's most fundamental principle. The covenant defines religion for Christians and Jews. We cannot discern God's design or his will if we do not meditate upon his covenant. The covenant, then, is the principle that unites the New Testament with the Old, the Scriptures with Tradition, and each of the various branches of theology with all the others. The covenant does more than bridge the gaps between these elements; it fills in the gaps, so that biblical scholarship, dogmatic theology, and magesterial authority all stand on common ground - solid ground.

Post Holocaust Christianity

Post Holocaust Christianity

Post Holocaust Christianity

This book gives a critical assessment of Paul van Buren's contribution to the Jewish-Christian dialogue, and attempts an original contribution of its own. The main body of the work is concerned with van Buren's 'A Theology of the Jewish-Christian Reality', a systematic rethinking of Christianity vis-a-vis Judaism in a Post-Holocaust world. The premise on which van Buren's rethinking of Christianity rests is that the covenant between God and the Jewish people is eternal. The author suggests an alternative theory which overlaps with the relationship between Judaism and Christianity.

Root Branch

Root   Branch

Root Branch


Faith Without Prejudice

Faith Without Prejudice

Faith Without Prejudice

"Marked improvement in the relationship between Christianity and Judaism is under way. During the past thirty years Eugene Fisher has been charting this development within the Catholic community, and here he discusses the changing attitudes of both the official church and its members. He describes the historical relationships, and addresses the question, "Are the Gospels anti-Semitic?" This book aims at providing the reader with some of the wealth of new insights emerging from the dialogue begun by Vatican II. It will offer ways of overcoming past misconceptions and strategies for implementing in the classroom and at home the goal of a prejudice-free life of faith. Finally, it will present in summary fashion the results of the author's study of current American Catholic teaching materials. The study measured Christian teaching about the Jews according to the directives of the latest Vatican Guidelines and the results of biblical scholarship. In this way, it is hoped, the reader will find a practical and concrete guide to a renewed understanding of Judaism - and through it of Christianity itself."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved