Veeck As In Wreck

Veeck  As In Wreck

Veeck As In Wreck

Bill Veeck was an inspired team builder, a consummate showman, and one of the greatest baseball men ever involved in the game. His classic autobiography, written with the talented sportswriter Ed Linn, is an uproarious book packed with information about the history of baseball and tales of players and owners, including some of the most entertaining stories in all of sports literature.

The Hustler s Handbook

The Hustler s Handbook

The Hustler s Handbook

What is the difference between a promoter and a hustler?" Bill Veeck asks. "Well, let's look at it this way. Neither one of them is an advertiser. An advertiser pays for his space. A promoter works out a quid pro quo . A hustler gets a free ride and makes it seem as if he's doing you a favor." Keep this in mind as Veeck, one of baseball's all time characters and certainly its best ever hustler, draws on an apparently bottomless well of stories, anecdotes, theories, and attitudes involving the often bizarre world of major league baseball. And, of course, he's never afraid to speak his mind. The Hustler's Handbook is a rich, hilarious, flagrantly outspoken lesson on how to operate as a hustler in the corporate jungle of modern baseball."

Greatness in the Shadows

Greatness in the Shadows

Greatness in the Shadows

Just weeks after Jackie Robinson joined the Brooklyn Dodgers, Larry Doby joined Robinson in breaking the color barrier in the major leagues when he became the first black player to integrate the American League, signing with the Cleveland Indians in July 1947. Doby went on to be a seven-time All-Star center fielder who led the Indians to two pennants. In many respects Robinson and Doby were equals in their baseball talent and experiences and had remarkably similar playing careers: both were well-educated, well-spoken World War II veterans and both had played spectacularly, albeit briefly, in the Negro Leagues. Like Robinson, Doby suffered brickbats, knock-down pitches, spit in his face, and other forms of abuse and discrimination. Doby was also a pioneering manager, becoming the second black manager after Frank Robinson. Well into the 1950s Doby was the only African American All-Star in the American League during a period in which fifteen black players became National League All-Stars. Why is Doby largely forgotten as a central figure in baseball's integration? Why has he not been accorded his rightful place in baseball history? Greatness in the Shadows attempts to answer these questions, bringing Doby's story to life and sharing his achievements and firsts with a new generation.

Marketing Your Dreams

Marketing Your Dreams

Marketing Your Dreams

Bill Veeck marketed, promoted, and sold baseball like no one before him and like no one since. Influenced and inspired by the classic sports book Veeck: As in Wreck, veteran author and motivational speaker Pat Williams has penned his 19th book, Marketing Your Dreams: Business and Life Lessons from Bill Veeck, Baseball's Marketing Genius. Williams, senior vice president of the NBA's Orlando Magic, insists that Marketing Your Dreams isn't a Bill Veeck biography; instead, it's a book about success, a book about one of the most relentless and fascinating personalities in the history of organized sports. It's a book about extracting Veeck's traits and concentrating them into their purest form so that the reader can pull the same kind of inspiration from the master that Williams did.

Bill Veeck s Crosstown Classic

Bill Veeck s Crosstown Classic

Bill Veeck s Crosstown Classic

Baseball Hall of Famer Bill Veeck (1914–86) was an inspired team builder, a consummate showman, and one of the greatest baseball men ever involved in the game. Bill Veeck’s Crosstown Classic, drawn from his uproarious autobiography (cowritten with the talented sportswriter Ed Linn), is an unforgettable trip packed with anecdotes and insight about the history of baseball and tales of players and owners—some of the most entertaining stories in all of sports literature. Veeck’s own love for the game began when his father was manager and then President of the Chicago Cubs; upon his father’s death in 1930, Veeck was hired as an office boy for eighteen dollars a week. Here, Veeck recollects those halcyon days and how they underscored his development as a wily franchise owner, leading up to quite a rumpus, many years later, during his purchase of the White Sox from the “Battling Comiskeys.”

After Many a Summer

After Many a Summer

After Many a Summer

"By the mid-1950s, New York had been the unrivaled capital of America's national pastime for a century, a place where baseball was followed with a truly fanatical fevor. The city's threee teams--the New York Yankees, the New York Giants, and the Brooklyn Dodgers--had over the previous decade rewarded their fans'devotion with stellar performances: From 1947-1957, one or more of these teems had played in the World series every year but one. Yet on opening day 1958, the Giants and Dogers were gone. Their owners, Walter O'Malley and Horance Stoneham, had ripped them away from their longtime home and from the hearts of millions of devoted and passionate fans and taken them to California" -- inside cover.

Thirty Tons a Day

Thirty Tons a Day

Thirty Tons a Day

In between his romances with baseball, in early 1969 Bill Veeck took up the challenge of managing Boston's semi-moribund Suffolk Downs racetrack. When he took over the track, Veeck had yet to learn that the normal daily output of some sixteen hundred horses (including straw) would amount to so much, or be so hard to dispose of. But that was the least of his problems.

Baseball s Pivotal Era 1945 1951

Baseball s Pivotal Era  1945 1951

Baseball s Pivotal Era 1945 1951

Looks at the developments in professional baseball in the six years following the end of World War II

Chicago Portraits

Chicago Portraits

Chicago Portraits

Provides sketches of prominent figures associated with the city of Chicago, including Nelson Algren and Sherwood Anderson.

Out and about with Winsor French

Out and about with Winsor French

Out and about with Winsor French

Discusses the life of Winsor French and his career as a newspaper columnist in Cleveland.