Veeck As In Wreck

Veeck  As In Wreck

Veeck As In Wreck

Bill Veeck was an inspired team builder, a consummate showman, and one of the greatest baseball men ever involved in the game. His classic autobiography, written with the talented sportswriter Ed Linn, is an uproarious book packed with information about the history of baseball and tales of players and owners, including some of the most entertaining stories in all of sports literature.

Veeck As in Wreck

Veeck As in Wreck

Veeck As in Wreck


Veeck As in Wreck

Veeck As in Wreck

Veeck As in Wreck


Bill Veeck

Bill Veeck

Bill Veeck

Draws on primary sources and more than 100 interviews in a richly detailed portrait of the influential baseball team owner and promoter, providing coverage of such topics as his relationships with his Chicago Cubs president father, his struggles with formidable war injuries and his steadfast advocacy of integration. 40,000 first printing.

After Many a Summer

After Many a Summer

After Many a Summer

"By the mid-1950s, New York had been the unrivaled capital of America's national pastime for a century, a place where baseball was followed with a truly fanatical fevor. The city's threee teams--the New York Yankees, the New York Giants, and the Brooklyn Dodgers--had over the previous decade rewarded their fans'devotion with stellar performances: From 1947-1957, one or more of these teems had played in the World series every year but one. Yet on opening day 1958, the Giants and Dogers were gone. Their owners, Walter O'Malley and Horance Stoneham, had ripped them away from their longtime home and from the hearts of millions of devoted and passionate fans and taken them to California" -- inside cover.

Marketing Your Dreams

Marketing Your Dreams

Marketing Your Dreams

Bill Veeck marketed, promoted, and sold baseball like no one before him and like no one since. Influenced and inspired by the classic sports book Veeck: As in Wreck, veteran author and motivational speaker Pat Williams has penned his 19th book, Marketing Your Dreams: Business and Life Lessons from Bill Veeck, Baseball's Marketing Genius. Williams, senior vice president of the NBA's Orlando Magic, insists that Marketing Your Dreams isn't a Bill Veeck biography; instead, it's a book about success, a book about one of the most relentless and fascinating personalities in the history of organized sports. It's a book about extracting Veeck's traits and concentrating them into their purest form so that the reader can pull the same kind of inspiration from the master that Williams did.

Norway Oil and Gas Exploration Laws and Regulation Handbook

Norway Oil and Gas Exploration Laws and Regulation Handbook

Norway Oil and Gas Exploration Laws and Regulation Handbook

Bill Veeck marketed, promoted, and sold baseball like no one before him and like no one since. Influenced and inspired by the classic sports book Veeck: As in Wreck, veteran author and motivational speaker Pat Williams has penned his 19th book, Marketing Your Dreams: Lessons in Business and Life from Bill Veeck. Williams, senior vice president of the NBA’s Orlando Magic, insists that Marketing Your Dreams isn’t a Bill Veeck biography; instead, it’s a book about success, a book about one of the most relentless and fascinating personalities in the history of organized sports. It’s a book about extracting Veeck’s traits and concentrating them into their purest form so that the reader can pull the same kind of inspiration from the master that Williams did. So whether you’re a sports fan, a businessman, a marketer, or a promoter, Marketing Your Dreams will be a book that you’ll turn to over and over again.

Bill Veeck

Bill Veeck

Bill Veeck

William Louis "Bill" Veeck, Jr. (1914-1986) is legendary in many ways-baseball impresario and innovator, independent spirit, champion of civil rights in a time of great change. Paul Dickson has written the first full biography of this towering figure, in the process rewriting many aspects of his life and bringing alive the history of America's pastime. In his late 20s, Veeck bought into his first team, the American Association Milwaukee Brewers. After serving and losing a leg in WWII, he bought the Cleveland Indians in 1946, and a year later broke the color barrier in the American League by signing Larry Doby, a few months after Jackie Robinson-showing the deep commitment he held to integration and equal rights. Cleveland won the World Series in 1948, but Veeck sold the team for financial reasons the next year. He bought a majority of the St. Louis Browns in 1951, sold it three years later, then returned in 1959 to buy the other Chicago team, the White Sox, winning the American League pennant his first year. Ill health led him to sell two years later, only to gain ownership again, 1975-1981. Veeck's promotional spirit-the likes of clown prince Max Patkin and midget Eddie Gaedel are inextricably connected with him-and passion endeared him to fans, while his feel for the game led him to propose innovations way ahead of their time, and his deep sense of morality not only integrated the sport but helped usher in the free agency that broke the stranglehold owners had on players. (Veeck was the only owner to testify in support of Curt Flood during his landmark free agency case). Bill Veeck: Baseball's Greatest Maverick is a deeply insightful, powerful biography of a fascinating figure. It will take its place beside the recent bestselling biographies of Satchel Paige and Mickey Mantle, and will be the baseball book of the season in Spring 2012.

Tearin Up the Pea Patch

      Tearin       Up the Pea Patch

Tearin Up the Pea Patch

Arguably the greatest ball club in National League history, the 1953 Brooklyn Dodgers recorded some staggering statistics. They led the league in virtually every offensive category while fielding some of the finest defensive players of the era. But the team’s extraordinary success on the field is only part of their story. Jackie Robinson was in his seventh year since breaking the color barrier, but ugly racist incidents were yet to abate and several marred the ’53 season. The most intense rivalry in sports climaxed with a September brawl as Dodger Carl Furillo floored Giants manager Leo Durocher. First baseman Gil Hodges weathered a horrendous slump with the support of the team’s devoted fans. This book tells the exciting story of the ’53 Brooklyn Dodgers, highlighting a season and a team.