The Waterloo Roll Call

The Waterloo Roll Call

The Waterloo Roll Call


The Waterloo Roll Call with Biographical Notes and Anecdotes

The Waterloo Roll Call  with Biographical Notes and Anecdotes

The Waterloo Roll Call with Biographical Notes and Anecdotes

NEVER since the days of Oliver Cromwell bad any name caused so much fear in England as did that of Napoleon Bonaparte. From 1802 until his first downfall, in 1814, a spirit of alarm and uneasiness pervaded all classes in Great Britain, from the King and his Ministers down to the most illiterate peasant. Those who were witnesses of, and participators in, this panic have now passed away, but the national pride which our victory over Napoleon at Waterloo excited in every Briton's breast is as strong as ever, and will last till the crack of doom. In July, 1803, a little pamphlet, entitled Important Considerations for the People of this Kingdom, was published in London, and " sent to the officiating minister of every parish in England." This pamphlet, which bears the Royal Arms of England, was an appeal from the Government to the Nation, and a diatribe against Napoleon. Mark the closing lines of this appeal: " Shall we, who are abundantly supplied with iron and steel, powder and lead-shall we, who have a fleet superior to the maritime force of all the world, and who are able to bring two millions of fighting men into the field-shall we yield up this dear and happy land, together with all the liberties and honours, to preserve which our fathers so often dyed the land and the sea with their blood ? . . . No, we are not so miserably fallen; we cannot, in so short a space of time, have become so detestably degenerate; we have the strength and the will to repel the hostility, to chastise the insolence of the foe. Mighty, indeed, INTRODUCTION TO FIRST EDITION...

The Waterloo Roll Call

The Waterloo Roll Call

The Waterloo Roll Call

Born in Dublin, 1st May, 1769. 3rd son of Garrett, 1st Earl of Mornington, by Anne, eldest dau. of Arthur, 1st Viscount Dungannon. Educated at Eton and Angers Military Academy. Like Clive, he was "a heaven born general." His fame far exceeded the many titles he won by his genius. "I am going to dine with Wellington to-night," said a young Irish staff officer to a group of brother officers at the close of a hard-fought battle in Spain. "Give me at least the prefix of Mr. before my name," said Lord Wellington, who happened to ride by at the moment and had overheard the jubilant remark. "My Lord," replied the officer, "we do not speak of Mr. Cæsar, or Mr. Alexander, so why should I speak of Mr. Wellington?" The Duke d. at Walmer Castle, 14th Sept., 1852, and was buried in St. Paul's Cathedral. He had m., in 1806, the Hon. Catherine Pakenham, 3rd dau. of Edward, 2nd Lord Longford, and by her, who d. in 1831, left issue. MILITARY SECRETARY. Lt. Col. Lord Fitzroy Somerset, 1st Ft. Gds., W. Youngest son of Henry, 5th Duke of Beaufort.

The Campaign of Waterloo

The Campaign of Waterloo

The Campaign of Waterloo


A Voice from Waterloo

A Voice from Waterloo

A Voice from Waterloo


God Save the Queen

God Save the Queen

God Save the Queen