Waterloo the Campaign Of 1815

Waterloo  the Campaign Of 1815

Waterloo the Campaign Of 1815

The first of two groundbreaking volumes on the Waterloo campaign, this book is based upon a detailed analysis of sources old and new in four languages. It highlights the political stresses between the Allies, and their resolution; it studies the problems of feeding and paying for 250,000 Allied forces assembling in Belgium during the 'undeclared war', and how a strategy was thrashed out. It studies the neglected topic of how the slow and discordant Allies beyond the Rhine hampered the plans of Bl�cher and Wellington, thus allowing Napoleon to snatch the initiative from them. Napoleon's operational plan is analyzed (and Soult's mistakes in executing it). Accounts from both sides help provide a vivid impression of the fighting on the first day, 15 June, and the volume ends with the joint battles of Ligny and Quatre Bras the next day.

Waterloo The Campaign of 1815 Volume I

Waterloo  The Campaign of 1815  Volume I

Waterloo The Campaign of 1815 Volume I

This, the fourth volume in Andrew Field's highly praised study of the Waterloo campaign from the French perspective, depicts in vivid detail the often neglected final phase the rout and retreat of Napoleon's army. The text is based exclusively on French eyewitness accounts which give an inside view of the immediate aftermath of the battle and carry the story through to the army's disbandment in late 1815. Many French officers and soldiers wrote more about the retreat than they did about the catastrophe of Waterloo itself. Their recollections give a fascinating insight to the psyche of the French soldier. They also provide a firsthand record of their experiences and the range of their reactions, from those who deserted the colors and made their way home, to those who continued to serve faithfully when all was lost. Napoleons own flight from Waterloo is an essential part of the narrative, but the main emphasis is on the fate of the beaten French army as it was experienced by eyewitnesses who lived through the last days of the campaign.

Waterloo the Campaign of 1815 Volume II

Waterloo  the Campaign of 1815  Volume II

Waterloo the Campaign of 1815 Volume II

"A masterful study of command, control, communications, and even intelligence of all the major combatants during the Waterloo Campaign. Destined to become the gold standard for those studying how armies were controlled and decisions made during the Waterloo Campaign.

Waterloo The Campaign of 1815 Volume 2

Waterloo  The Campaign of 1815  Volume 2

Waterloo The Campaign of 1815 Volume 2

Winner of the 2019 RUSI Duke of Wellington Medal for Military HistoryWinner of the 2017 Society for Army Historical Research Templer MedalShortlisted for Military History Monthly's "Book of the Year" AwardThe first of two groundbreaking volumes on the Waterloo campaign, this book is based upon a detailed analysis of sources old and new in four languages. It highlights the political stresses between the Allies, and their resolution; it studies the problems of feeding and paying for 250,000 Allied forces assembling in Belgium during the undeclared war, and how a strategy was thrashed out. It studies the neglected topic of how the slow and discordant Allies beyond the Rhine hampered the plans of Blcher and Wellington, thus allowing Napoleon to snatch the initiative from them. Napoleons operational plan is analyzed (and Soult's mistakes in executing it). Accounts from both sides help provide a vivid impression of the fighting on the first day, 15 June, and the volume ends with the joint battles of Ligny and Quatre Bras the next day.

Waterloo

Waterloo

Waterloo

The concluding volume of this work provides a fresh description of the climatic battle of Waterloo placed in the context of the whole campaign. It discusses several vexed questions: Blucher's intentions for the battle, Wellington's choice of site, his reasons for placing substantial forces at Hal, the placement of Napoleon's artillery, who authorized the French cavalry attacks, Grouchy's role on 18 and 19 June, Napoleon's own statements on the Garde's formation in the final attack, and the climactic moment when the Prussians reached Wellington's troops near la Belle Alliance. Close attention is paid to the negotiations that led to the capitulation of Paris, and subsequent French claims. The allegations of Las Cases and later historians that Napoleon's surrender to Captain Maitland of the Bellerophon amounted to entrapment are also examined. After a survey of the peace settlement of 1815, the book concludes with a masterly chapter reviewing the whole story of the 1815 campaign.

Waterloo

Waterloo

Waterloo

Waterloo: The Campaign of 1815 is illustrated with paintings, photographs and illustrations throughout, together with informative maps to guide the reader through each stage of the action. The book brings the mighty clash into focus for those not versed in 19Ýsuperscript th¨-century warfare, while at the same time offering the military history enthusiast a vigorously argued standpoint. Author Jacques Logic does not desert the field when it comes to apportioning blame for the defeat. A concise analysis of the historical background to the 1815 campaign, a review of contemporary warfare and of the armies in the field and their commanders sets the scene. The battle cannot be hermetically sealed off from Quatre-Bras, Ligny and later, Wavre. So the events of 15 June to 20 June are chronologically unfolded in detail, at once glorious and terrible. The author's closely argued interpretation of events follows. The second section provides a fascinating insight into the immediate aftermath: the medals, war damages, not least the elevation of Wellington to Olympian status. The longer term cultural heritage forms the final part, considering the battle as a political symbol, as a subject in art and literature and the Waterloo legacy in European (and world) history.

1815

1815

1815

In this masterly study of 1815, Peter Hofschroer challenges the accepted version of events at the battle of Waterloo. He demonstrates convincingly that Allied victory hinged on the contribution of German soldiers. In this masterly study of 1815, Peter Hofschroer challenges the accepted version of events at the battle of Waterloo. He demonstrates convincingly that Allied victory hinged on the contribution of German soldiers. Drawing on previously unpublished accounts, Hofschroer gives not only the Prussian perspective of their march to Waterloo and decisive attack on Napoleon's flank, but also details of the actions fought by some of the 25,000 Germans in Wellington's µBritish' army v more than a third of the Duke's force. A gripping narrative of astonishing detail captures such key episodes of Waterloo as La Haye Sainte, Papelotte, Hougoumont and the Prussian struggle with the Imperial Guard for Plancenoit. In addition, Hofschr˜er examines the battle at Wavre, the Allied offensive into France, the taking of Paris and the sieges across northern France.

Journal of the Waterloo Campaign

Journal of the Waterloo Campaign

Journal of the Waterloo Campaign