Weightlifting

Weightlifting

Weightlifting

Weight training is one of the world's most popular sporting activities. It is also a leading cause of sports injuries, especially among young people whose bodies are still developing. Learn in detail how to avoid injury when weight training, and what you should do if an injury occurs. Pre-training preparation is vital, and this book discusses everything from selecting the right gym and using equipment properly to mental training and proper warm-up routines. The causes and cures for weight-training injuries are clearly described, with a particular emphasis on developing good technique. Methods of self-treatment for injury are given priority, but the book is also clear about when you should see a doctor. Discover: • How to rehabilitate a shoulder injury. • How simple changes in posture can protect your back. • What type of weight training routine you should follow if you are under eighteen. • The importance of good nutrition. • The dangers of performance-enhancing drugs.

Ultimate Olympic Weightlifting

Ultimate Olympic Weightlifting

Ultimate Olympic Weightlifting

ACHIEVE OLYMPIC STRENGTH WITH THIS HARDCORE GUIDE TO WEIGHTLIFTING Every four years, the world’s most powerful athletes showcase their amazing abilities at the Olympics. This book takes you step by step through the same primary lifts, assistance movements, and training techniques used by these high-level athletes to help you build explosive strength, power, and speed. By following the programs, exercises, and instructions in Ultimate Olympic Weightlifting, you learn how to: • Develop Full-Body Strength • Perfect Your Barbell Lifting Form • Utilize Cross-Training Techniques • Fuel Your Body for Working Out • Avoid Overexertion and Injury

Weightlifting Training and Biomechanics

Weightlifting Training and Biomechanics

Weightlifting Training and Biomechanics

Weightlifting Training and Biomechanics covers a gamut of training and technique from the perspective of Soviet era sport science to modern radical, departures in theory of biomechanics: “Can There Be Such A Thing As An Asian Pull”; “Equilibrium in Weightlifting”; “The Foot, the Ankle Joint and Asian Pull”. “Asian pull’ technique is in all probability an effort to circumvent gravity by finding the path of least resistance for the body’s movements, which means these movements need not be designed to raise body center of mass as high as possible (as in the Russian pull) before squatting under the barbell. “The Asian pull technique is antithetical to Russian protocols which stipulate the lifter remain flat - footed as trunk and thighs straighten in unison during the explosion phase (see figure 3). Much of the explosion phase of the Asian pull is carried out with shoulder joints behind the vertical line of the bar with heels raised as legs straighten.” “Peculiarities of balance, equilibrium and stability are not unique to weightlifting. In point of fact they can even be considered 'normal aberrations' in athletics; given the extraordinary complexity of the human body's movement possibilities. Furthermore, the high incidence of injuries in American sport can be traced to a catastrophic outcome of strength and conditioning training, therapeutics and the like; where an athlete's movements are choreographed to conform to rigid, arbitrarily conceived limitations; especially linear (Charniga, 2015 - 2017). Five articles have appeared in the EWF Science journal with another two awaiting publication.

The Female in Weightlifting

The Female in Weightlifting

The Female in Weightlifting

The Female in Weightlifting features a series of essays about the peculiarities of female weightlifters. Some history and the challenges of the participation of females in weightlifting “De- masculinization of strength”; “How the female weightlifter outgrew the lady bar” are presented. Unique stereotype debunking essays about how females ‘express’ strength’ “Expression of Strength in Weightlifting”; prepare for competition attempts: “Comparison of Warm Up Protocols of High Class Male and Female Weightlifters”. “Discrete alterations in facial expression, in all probability, mirror the female lifter's intrinsic abilities to optimize tension of muscles, i.e., to eliminate unnecessary tension for effective rapid switching the disposition of the body during the weightlifting exercises.” “The 'sleeping' female weightlifter receiving the full weight of the barbell in the low squat in figure 5 is a unique 'expression' of muscular strain, i.e., an ambiguity of nature.” “The point here is not point a finger, but to make the point: the strength of today’s women lifters is beyond the equipment, originally designed for a “weaker sex”, whatever that is.” An original and unique theory of the female weightlifter’s low injury susceptibility is presented: “Shouldn’t female weightlifters be injury prone”. … the ability to react quickly, in many respects, faster than males, to unanticipated circumstances, loss of balance, falling and so forth, with very rapid reflexive release of muscle tension to dissipate and/or otherwise re - distribute mechanical energy.” Three essays of this book have appeared in the EWF Science journal with another awaiting publication.

Strength Training For Weightlifting

Strength Training For Weightlifting

Strength Training For Weightlifting

Whether you're just getting started working out, or you're looking to add strength training to your cardio routine, weight lifting for beginners can seem anything but simple. There's a bunch of fitness equipment involved--how exactly do you use that big looped resistance band again?--the moves can be confusing, and you may worry that you might not have the strength to do them. It's true that weight lifting can appear intimidating--especially if you're scrolling through social media and seeing people deadlifting double their bodyweight, pressing a loaded barbell over their head, or banging out Superman push-ups where they fly into the air. But it's important to remember that those are just highlight reels of people who have been lifting for a very long time. When they first began, you can be pretty sure that they started small. Those explosive push-ups? It's likely they started as a modified, knees-on-the-floor variation. This book will describe how certain correlations can be used for programming and training purposes and why repeated precision, specific times in motion and non-deceleratated actions must become the methodology of training and what happens when training is composed of erratic lifting, erratic times in motion and decelerated actions. Many years of research has gone into the premise of this book and that research has culminated into the various correlations and formulas that are valuable for everyone who is interested in developing their full potential as an athlete and specifically as a weightlifter.

The Weightlifting Encyclopedia

The Weightlifting Encyclopedia

The Weightlifting Encyclopedia

Lifting weights is perhaps one of the fastest growing athletic activities of recent years. While many lift weights, many more would like to do so if they simply knew how to go about it. And those who know the most about weightlifting, serious competitive weightlifters, are not very accessible to the public. This book reveals the secrets of weightlifting, in material culled from more than 30 years of competitive experience, a review of more than 60 years of weightlifting literature, and extensive interviews with many of the greats of the sport.

Weightlifting

Weightlifting

Weightlifting

Describes the history of the sport of weight lifting, as well as the training, equipment, rules, and techniques involved.

Olympic Weightlifting

Olympic Weightlifting

Olympic Weightlifting

Since shortly after its original release in 2008, Olympic Weightlifting: A Complete Guide for Athletes & Coaches has been the most popular book on the sport of weightlifting in the world and has become the standard text for learning and teaching the snatch and clean & jerk. This all new third edition has been expanded over 150 pages with revised and improved chapters, new chapters, improved organization, more tables and diagrams, over 600 photographs, improved readability, and improved reference functionality with an index, glossary and expanded table of contents. The book presents a complete progression for athletes and coaches starting with foundational elements such as breath control and trunk stabilization, squatting, balance and weight distribution, warming-up, individual variation; working to complete learning and teaching progressions for the snatch, clean and jerk; covering training program design extensively, including assessment for recruiting and new lifters, and 16 sample training programs; technical error correction, supplemental exercises, nutrition, bodyweight manipulation, and mobility; and a thorough section on competition to prepare both lifters and coaches. "Simply the best book available on Olympic weightlifting." -Don Weideman, Vice President, Pacific Weightlifting Association "Without a doubt the best book on the market today about Olympic-style weightlifting." -Mike Burgener, USA Weightlifting senior international coach "Outstanding, Accurate, and Concise! A must read for athletes and coaches involved in the movements." -Daniel Camargo, USA Weightlifting International Coach "Everett's Olympic Weightlifting text is one of the best instructional books for the sport to be published in years. This is a must have for every weightlifting/strength and conditioning coach's library shelf." Bob Takano, Member USA Weightlifting Hall of Fame "Everett's book is one of the most accessible and comprehensive weightlifting sources available for the coach and athlete today. I highly recommend this book for every serious strength coach or weightlifting practitioner." -John Thrush, Head Coach Calpians Weightlifting Table of Contents Foundations Understanding the Lifts Learning & Teaching the Lifts Individual Variation Facility & Equipment Warming Up Breathing & Trunk Rigidity The Squat Foot Positions & Transition The Hook Grip The Double Knee Bend Starting Position Principles The Snatch Introduction to the Snatch The Receiving Position Learning the Snatch Pulling from the Floor Understanding the Snatch The Clean Introduction to the Clean The Receiving Position Learning the Clean Pulling from the Floor Understanding the Clean The Jerk Introduction to the Jerk The Receiving Position Learning the Jerk Understanding the Jerk The Clean & Jerk Error Correction Introduction to Error Correction Universal Errors Snatch Errors Clean Errors Jerk Errors Program Design & Training Introduction to Program Design Assessment Training Variables Jump Training Assistance Work The Bulgarian Method Specific Populations The Program Design Process Restoration & Recovery Training Practices Sample Training Programs Supplemental Exercises Introduction to Supplemental Exercises Snatch Exercises Clean Exercises Jerk Exercises General Exercises Nutrition & Bodyweight Introduction to Nutrition Bodyweight Supplements Mobility & Flexibility Introduction to Mobility Stretches Self-Myofascial Release Competition