What Would Virginia Woolf Do

What Would Virginia Woolf Do

What Would Virginia Woolf Do

When Nina Collins entered her forties she found herself awash in a sea of hormones. As symptoms of perimenopause set in, she began to fear losing her health, looks, sexuality, sense of humor-perhaps all at once. Craving a place to discuss her questions and concerns, and finding none, Nina started a Facebook group with the ironic name, "What Would Virginia Woolf Do?," which has grown exponentially into a place where women-most with strong opinions and fierce senses of humor--have surprisingly candid, lively, and intimate conversations. Mid-life is a time when women want to think about purpose, about how to be their best selves, and how to love themselves as they enter the second half of life. They yearn to acknowledge the nostalgia and sadness that comes with aging, but also want to revel in their hard-earned wisdom. Part memoir and part resource on everything from fashion and skincare to sex and surviving the empty nest, What Would Virginia Woolf Do? is a frank and intimate conversation mixed with anecdotes and honesty, wrapped up in a literary joke. It's also a destination, a place where readers can nestle in and see what happens when women feel comfortable enough to get real with each other: defy the shame that the culture often throws their way, find solace and laugh out loud, and revel in this new phase of life.

Virginia Woolf and Heritage

Virginia Woolf and Heritage

Virginia Woolf and Heritage

This volume aims to situate Virginia Woolf as a writer who, despite her fame as a leading modernist, also drew on a rich literary and cultural heritage. The chapters in this volume explore the role her family heritage, literary tradition and heritage locations play in Woolf' s works, uncovering the influence the past had on her work, and particularly her deep indebtedness to the Victorian period in the process. It looks at how she reimagined heritage, including her queer readings of the past. This volume also aims to examine Woolf' s own literary legacy: with essays examining her reception in Romania, Poland and France and her impact on contemporary writers like Alice Munro and Lidia Yuknavitch. Lastly, Woolf' s standing in the increasingly popular field of biofiction is explored. The collection features an extended chapter on Virginia Woolf' s relationship with her cousin H.A.L. Fisher by David Bradshaw, and an extended chapter by Laura Marcus on Woolf and the concept of shame.

Competing Stories

Competing Stories

Competing Stories

Major changes in media in the late 19th and early 20th centuries challenged traditional ideas about artistic representation and opened new avenues for authors working in the modernist period. Modernist authors’ reactions to this changing media landscape were often fraught with complications and shed light on the difficulty of negotiating, understanding, and depicting media. The author of Competing Stories: Modernist Authors, Newspapers, and the Movies argues that negative depictions of newspapers and movies, in modernist fiction, largely stem from worries about the competition for modern audiences and the desire for control over storytelling and reflections of the modern world. This book looks at a moment of major change in media, the dominance of mass media that began with the primarily visual media of newspapers and movies, and the ways that authors like Ernest Hemingway, Zora Neale Hurston, James Joyce, Djuna Barnes, and others responded. The author contends that an examination of this moment may facilitate a better understanding of the relationship between media and authorship in our constantly shifting media landscape.

Imagined Futures

Imagined Futures

Imagined Futures

This study provides the first substantial history and analysis of the To-Day and To-Morrow series of 110 books, published by Kegan Paul Trench and Trubner (and E. P. Dutton in the USA) from 1923 to 1931, in which writers chose a topic, described its present, and predicted its future. Contributors included J. B. S. Haldane, Bertrand Russell, Vernon Lee, Robert Graves, Vera Brittain, Sylvia Pankhurst, Hugh McDiarmid, James Jeans, J. D. Bernal, Winifred Holtby, Andre Maurois, and many others. The study combines a comprehensive account of its interest, history, and range with a discussion of its key concerns, tropes, and influence. The argument focuses on science and technology, not only as the subject of many of the volumes, but also as method--especially through the paradigm of the human sciences--applied to other disciplines; and as a source of metaphors for representing other domains. It also includes chapters on war, technology, cultural studies, and literature and the arts. This book aims to reinstate the series as a vital contribution to the writing of modernity, and to reappraise modernism's relation to the future, establishing a body of progressive writing which moves beyond the discourses of post-Darwinian degeneration and post-war disenchantment, projecting human futures rather than mythic or classical pasts. It also shows how, as a co-ordinated body of futurological writing, the series is also revealing about the nature and practices of modern futurology itself.

Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Avant garde

Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Avant garde

Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Avant garde

Virginia Woolf and the Bloomsbury Avant-Garde traces the dynamic emergence of Woolf's art and thought against Bloomsbury's public thinking about Europe's future in a period marked by two world wars and rising threats of totalitarianism. Educated informally in her father's library and in Bloomsbury's London extension of Cambridge, Virginia Woolf came of age in the prewar decades, when progressive political and social movements gave hope that Europe "might really be on the brink of becoming civilized," as Leonard Woolf put it. For pacifist Bloomsbury, heir to Europe's unfinished Enlightenment project of human rights, democratic self-governance, and world peace—and, in E. M. Forster's words, "the only genuine movement in English civilization"— the 1914 "civil war" exposed barbarities within Europe: belligerent nationalisms, rapacious racialized economic imperialism, oppressive class and sex/gender systems, a tragic and unnecessary war that mobilized sixty-five million and left thirty-seven million casualties. An avant-garde in the twentieth-century struggle against the violence within European civilization, Bloomsbury and Woolf contributed richly to interwar debates on Europe's future at a moment when democracy's triumph over fascism and communism was by no means assured. Woolf honed her public voice in dialogue with contemporaries in and beyond Bloomsbury— John Maynard Keynes and Roger Fry to Sigmund Freud (published by the Woolfs'Hogarth Press), Bertrand Russell, T. S. Eliot, E. M. Forster, Katherine Mansfield, and many others—and her works embody and illuminate the convergence of aesthetics and politics in post-Enlightenment thought. An ambitious history of her writings in relation to important currents in British intellectual life in the first half of the twentieth century, this book explores Virginia Woolf's narrative journey from her first novel, The Voyage Out, through her last, Between the Acts.

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

Winner of the prestigious Prix Goncourt award for biography, this remarkable portrait sheds new light on Virginia Woolf's relationships with her family and friends and how they shaped her work. Virginia Woolf: A Portrait blends recently unearthed documents, key primary sources, and personal interviews with Woolf's relatives and other acquaintances to render in unmatched detail the author's complicated relationship with her husband, Leonard; her father, Leslie Stephen; and her half-sister, Vanessa Bell. Forrester connects these figures to Woolf's mental breakdown while introducing the concept of "Virginia seule," or Virginia alone: an uncommon paragon of female strength and conviction. Forrester's biography inhabits her characters and vivifies their perspective, weaving a colorful, intense drama that forces readers to rethink their understanding of Woolf, her writing, and her world.

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf occupies a central place in twentieth-century literature. Her works define the progress of fiction from Edwardian novel to post-Modernist text, and in the decade between 1922 and 1931, with Jacob's Room, Mrs Dalloway, To the Lighthouse and The Waves, she was in the forefront of modernist writing. She was also a prolific journalist and active publisher. In this study Edward Bishop provides an overview of Woolf's life as a writer, explores the connections between her fiction and her criticism, and analyses her major novels, tracing the development of her experimental techniques and her evolving sense of language.

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

Virginia Woolf

Hermione Lee sees Virginia Woolf afresh, in her historical setting and as a vital figure for our times. Her book moves freely between a richly detailed life-story and new attempts to understand crucial questions - the impact of her childhood, the cause and nature of her madness and suicide, the truth about her marriage, her feelings for women, her prejudies and obsessions. This is a vivid, close-up portrait, returning to primary sources, and showing Woolf as occupying a distinct, even uneasy position with 'Bloomsbury'. It is a writer's life, illustrating how the concerns of her work arise and develop, and a political life, which establishes Woolf as a radically sceptical, subversive, courageous feminist. Incorporating newly discovered sources and illustrated with photos and drawings never used before, this biography is a revelation -informed, intelligent and moving.

Virginia Woolf in Context

Virginia Woolf in Context

Virginia Woolf in Context

Covering a wide range of historical, theoretical, critical and cultural contexts, this collection studies key issues in contemporary Woolf studies.