Wire Jewelry in an Afternoon

Wire Jewelry in an Afternoon

Wire Jewelry in an Afternoon

“Spirals, coils, wraps, and wire mesh add up to a kind of jewelry that...can go from pieces of scrap to ear, neck, or hair in a couple of hours...the directions for 66 varieties of adornment featured here...including diagrams, designer credit, color photographs, materials lists, and step-by-step instructions...are whimsical enough for having great fun and feature such familiar characters as Santa and a bride and groom, and such creatures as a dragonfly and a spider.”—Booklist.

Making Wire Jewelry

Making Wire Jewelry

Making Wire Jewelry

Includes information on tools, materials, and finishing, and offers instructions on creating decorative pins, rings, earrings, and chains

The London Gazette

The London Gazette

The London Gazette


Vinegar Soup

Vinegar Soup

Vinegar Soup

Full of dark comic invention, Vinegar Soup is a fantasy with a flavour all its own... an epic romance of true love, travel, and food Gilbert Firestone, fat and fifty, works in the kitchen of the Hercules Cafe and dreams of travel and adventure. When his wife drowns in a pan of soup, he abandons the kitchen and takes his family to start a new life in a jungle hotel in Africa. But rain, pygmies and crazy chickens start to turn his dreams into nightmares. And then the enormous Charlotte arrives with her brothel on wheels. Praise for Miles Gibson ‘Miles Gibson writes with a nervous versatility that is often very funny and never lacks a life of its own.’ Guardian ‘Miles Gibson is a natural born poet.’ Ray Bradbury

The Wire

The Wire

The Wire


I Cried for Africa

I Cried for Africa

I Cried for Africa

This is the true story of John and Sylvia Grosart who lived for sixteen years in Africa. It tells of their experiences through their eyes, of the wild life, poverty, corruption and survival from South Africa through to Malawi which culminated in tradgedy.

The Jewels of Miriam Haskell

The Jewels of Miriam Haskell

The Jewels of Miriam Haskell

The first book ever devoted to the story of Miriam Haskell, one of America's most distinguished fashion jewelers, this reference features 200 jewelry pieces from collections in the U.S. and Europe, specially commissioned color photos, numerous contemporary magazine and advertisement extracts placing jewelry in the context of its era, and the history of a major costume jewelry house and its product. This is a significant reference volume for all who are interested in period jewelry. 250 photos, 200 in color.

Island of Barbed Wire

Island of Barbed Wire

Island of Barbed Wire

Many aspects of Britain's involvement in World War Two only slowly emerged from beneath the barrage of official secrets and popular misconception. One of the most controversial issues, the internment of 'enemy aliens' (and also British subjects) on the Isle of Man, received its first thorough examination in this remarkable account by Connery Chappell of life in the Manx camps between 1940 and 1945. At the outbreak of war there were approximately 75,000 people of Germanic origin living in Britain, and Whitehall decided to set up Enemy Alien Tribunals to screen these 'potential security risks'. The entry of Italy into the war almost doubled the workload. The first tribunal in February 1940 considered only 569 cases as high enough risks to warrant internment. The Isle of Man was chosen as the one place sufficiently removed from areas of military importance, but by the end of the year the number of enemy aliens on the island had reached 14,000. With the use of diaries, broadsheets, newspapers and personal testimonies, the author shows how a traditional holiday isle was transformed into an internment camp. of earning extra income. Eventually the internees took part in local farm work, ran their own camp newspapers and even set up internal businesses. With inmates of the calibre of Sir Nikolaus Pevsner, Lord Weidenfeld, Sir Charles Forte, Professor Geoffrey Elton and R.W. 'Tiny' Rowland, the life of the camp quickly took on a busy and constructive air; but the picture was not always such a happy one, as angry disputes flared between Fascist inmates and their Jewish neighbours, and a dangerous riot forced the intervention of the Home Office. Even now, there remains the persistent question never settled satisfactorily. Were the internments ever justified or even consistent?

The Engineer

The Engineer

The Engineer