Writing about Writing

Writing about Writing

Writing about Writing

Based on Wardle and Downs’ research, the first edition of Writing about Writing marked a milestone in the field of composition. By showing students how to draw on what they know in order to contribute to ongoing conversations about writing and literacy, it helped them transfer their writing-related skills from first-year composition to other courses and contexts. Now used by tens of thousands of students, Writing about Writing presents accessible writing studies research by authors such as Mike Rose, Deborah Brandt, John Swales, and Nancy Sommers, together with popular texts by authors such as Malcolm X and Anne Lamott, and texts from student writers. Throughout the book, friendly explanations and scaffolded activities and questions help students connect to readings and develop knowledge about writing that they can use at work, in their everyday lives, and in college. The new edition builds on this success and refines the approach to make it even more teachable. The second edition includes more help for understanding the rhetorical situation and an exciting new chapter on multimodal composing. The print text is now integrated with e-Pages for Writing about Writing, designed to take advantage of what the Web can do. The conversation on writing about writing continues on the authors' blog, Write On: Notes on Writing about Writing (a channel on Bedford Bits, the Bedford/St. Martin's blog for teachers of writing).

About Writing

About Writing

About Writing

Award-winning novelist Samuel R. Delany has written a book for creative writers to place alongside E. M. Forster’s Aspects of the Novel and Lajos Egri’s Art of Dramatic Writing. Taking up specifics (When do flashbacks work, and when should you avoid them? How do you make characters both vivid and sympathetic?) and generalities (How are novels structured? How do writers establish serious literary reputations today?), Delany also examines the condition of the contemporary creative writer and how it differs from that of the writer in the years of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and the high Modernists. Like a private writing tutorial, About Writing treats each topic with clarity and insight. Here is an indispensable companion for serious writers everywhere.

Nonconformity

Nonconformity

Nonconformity

NONCONFORMITY: WRITING ON WRITING The first paperback publication of the only major work of non-fiction by the author of 'The Man with the Golden Arm'. Written between 1950 and 1953, the book draws examples from major writers - Dostoyevsky, Chekhov, Fitzgerald etc - and uses their work in an attempt to identify the essential nature of the writer's relation to society.

Women Writing and Writing about Women

Women Writing and Writing about Women

Women Writing and Writing about Women

This innovative collection of contemporary essays in feminist literary criticism provides a spectrum of approaches and positions, united by their common focus on writing by and about women. Spanning the novel, poetry, drama, film and criticism, the contributors emphasise some of the problems of theory and practice posed by writing as a woman and by women’s representation in literature. The subjects of individual essays range from the nineteenth and twentieth century novel to avant-gardefilm, and from Victorian women poets to Russian women poets of today. Drawing on disciplines as diverse as structuralism, psychoanalysis, semiotics, socio-linguistics and Marxist analyses of literature, the essays suggest the variety and vigour of contemporary feminist literary criticism, as well as representing some of the debates currently animating it. Topics of common concern range from the nature of a women’s tradition in literature to the scope and method of feminist literary criticism itself. Successfully bridging the gap between literary criticism and literary production, the scope of this collection will be of considerable interest to those concerned with current developments in literary criticism as well as to those in the field of women’s studies.

Writing About Screen Media

Writing About Screen Media

Writing About Screen Media

Writing About Screen Media presents strategies for writing about a broad range of media objects – including film, television, social media, advertising, video games, mobile media, music videos, and digital media – in an equally broad range of formats. The book’s case studies showcase media studies’ geographical and industrial breadth, with essays covering topics as varied as: Brazilian telenovelas, K-pop music videos, Bombay cinema credit sequences, global streaming services, film festivals, archives, and more. With the expertise of over forty esteemed media scholars, the collection combines personal reflections about writing with practical advice. Writing About Screen Media reflects the diversity of screen media criticism and encourages both beginning and established writers to experiment with content and form. Through its unprecedented scope, this volume will engage not only those who may be writing about film and other screen media for the first time but also accomplished writers who are interested in exploring new screen media objects, new approaches to writing about media, and new formats for critical expression.

Naming What We Know

Naming What We Know

Naming What We Know

Naming What We Know examines the core principles of knowledge in the discipline of writing studies using the lens of “threshold concepts”—concepts that are critical for epistemological participation in a discipline. The first part of the book defines and describes thirty-seven threshold concepts of the discipline in entries written by some of the field’s most active researchers and teachers, all of whom participated in a collaborative wiki discussion guided by the editors. These entries are clear and accessible, written for an audience of writing scholars, students, and colleagues in other disciplines and policy makers outside the academy. Contributors describe the conceptual background of the field and the principles that run throughout practice, whether in research, teaching, assessment, or public work around writing. Chapters in the second part of the book describe the benefits and challenges of using threshold concepts in specific sites—first-year writing programs, WAC/WID programs, writing centers, writing majors—and for professional development to present this framework in action. Naming What We Know opens a dialogue about the concepts that writing scholars and teachers agree are critical and about why those concepts should and do matter to people outside the field.

Scientific Writing

Scientific Writing

Scientific Writing

Telling people about research is just as important as doing it. But many competent researchers are wary of scientific writing, despite its importance for sharpening scientific thinking, advancing their career, obtaining funding for their work and growing the prestige of their institution. This Second Edition of David Lindsay's popular book "Scientific Writing = Thinking in Words" presents a way of thinking about writing that builds on the way good scientists think about research. The simple principles in this book will help you to clarify the objectives of your work and present your results with impact. Fully updated throughout, with practical examples of good and bad writing, an expanded chapter on writing for non-scientists and a new chapter on writing grant applications, this book makes communicating research easier and encourages researchers to write confidently. It is an ideal reference for researchers preparing journal articles, posters, conference presentations, reviews and popular articles; for students preparing theses; and for researchers whose first language is not English.