Writing the Lost Generation

Writing the Lost Generation

Writing the Lost Generation

Members of the Lost Generation, American writers and artists who lived in Paris during the 1920s, continue to occupy an important place in our literary history. Rebelling against increased commercialism and the ebb of cosmopolitan society in early twentieth-century America, they rejected the culture of what Ernest Hemingway called a place of “broad lawns and narrow minds.” Much of what we know about these iconic literary figures comes from their own published letters and essays, revealing how adroitly they developed their own reputations by controlling the reception of their work. Surprisingly the literary world has paid less attention to their autobiographies. In Writing the Lost Generation, Craig Monk unlocks a series of neglected texts while reinvigorating our reading of more familiar ones. Well-known autobiographies by Malcolm Cowley, Ernest Hemingway, and Gertrude Stein are joined here by works from a variety of lesser-known—but still important—expatriate American writers, including Sylvia Beach, Alfred Kreymborg, Samuel Putnam, and Harold Stearns. By bringing together the self-reflective works of the Lost Generation and probing the ways the writers portrayed themselves, Monk provides an exciting and comprehensive overview of modernist expatriates from the United States.

The Expatriates

The Expatriates

The Expatriates

Their lavish lifestyle have inspired movies; their awarding winning books have inspired thousands of writers. What was it like to be a Lost Generation writer living in Europe? This book takes you inside to give you a glimpse. It includes biographies on T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald as well as an essay on the Lost Generation. Each of the biographies can also be purchased separately.

After the Lost Generation

After the Lost Generation

After the Lost Generation

John W. Aldridge is one of the few young critics of importance to appear on the literary scene since World War II. In AFTER THE LOST GENERATION he discusses with acumen and discernment the most important works of the young post-war writers of the Forties—Norman Mailer, Irwin Shaw, John Horne Burns, Truman Capote, Gore Vidal, Paul Bowles, Alfred Hayes and others. Aldridge discusses three writers of the 1920’s—Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, and F. Scott Fitzgerald—to introduce the writers of World War II. He draws significant parallels between the work of the two generations—between Hemingway and Hayes, between Fitzgerald and Burns, between Bowles and Hemingway, and between the “lost generation” of the Twenties and the “illusionless lads of the Forties.” More important than the likenesses between the two generations are the new developments. Norman Mailer and Irwin Shaw wrote enormous “encyclopedic” war novels which covered whole armies and had settings in a dozen different lands. John Horne Burns sought relief from the chaos of modernity in Italian culture and Old World tradition. Truman Capote dealt essentially with abnormalities and peculiarities in human nature. Anti-Semitism, the Negro problem, and homosexuality appear time and again in the new writing. The old themes with which Hemingway and Fitzgerald shattered Victorian patterns—sex, drinking, the brutalities of war—are no longer shocking. AFTER THE LOST GENERATION is a penetrating analysis of post-war fiction that already has provoked wide controversy and discussion. “A pioneer study...The first serious and challenging book about the new novelists.”—Malcolm Cowley, New York Herald Tribune

The Lost Generation Reader

The Lost Generation Reader

The Lost Generation Reader

Woody Allen made the glamour of Paris in the twenties magical in Midnight In Paris-but was that really the case? This anthologies of Lost Generation writers, shows you the work that made the movement. A short book on the history of the movement is also included in the work.Authors and works included in this anthology:E.E. CUMMINGSThe Enormous RoomT. S. ELIOTThe Love Song of J. Alfred PrufrockF. SCOTT FITZGERALDFlappers and PhilosophersJAMES JOYCEA Portrait of the Artist as a Young ManEZRA POUNDPoemsGERTRUDE STEINThree Lives

The Lost Generation

The Lost Generation

The Lost Generation

The Lost Generation: The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway, The Great Gatsby by Francis Scott Fitzgerald, Death of a Hero by Richard Aldington, Under Fire: The Story of a Squad by Henri Barbusse. After the First World War, special people returned to their home towns from the front. When the war began, they were still boys, but duty forced them to defend the homeland. "Lost Generation" - as they were called. This concept is used today when we talk about writers who worked during the breaks between the First and Second World Wars, which became a test for all of humanity and were almost all beaten out of their usual, peaceful rut. One of the themes that commonly appears in the authors' works is decadence and the frivolous lifestyle of the wealthy. Writers of the lost generation raise in their works the problem of young people who returned from the war and did not find their home, their relatives. Questions about how to live, how to remain human, how to learn to enjoy life again - this is what is paramount in this literary movement. Table of Contents: 1. Ernest Hemingway: A Farewell to Arms 2. Ernest Hemingway: The Sun Also Rises 3. Francis Scott Fitzgerald: The Great Gatsby 4. Richard Aldington: Death of a Hero 5. Henri Barbusse: Under Fire: The Story of a Squad

Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation

Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation

Sylvia Beach and the Lost Generation

Noel Riley Fitch has written a perfect book, full to the brim with literary history, correct and whole-hearted both in statement and in implication. She makes me feel and remember a good many things that happened before and after my time. I'm glad to have lived long enough to read it. --Glenway Wescott

Zarathustra s Children

Zarathustra s Children

Zarathustra s Children

A study of the enormous influence of the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche on turn-of-the-century German literature.

Modern Lives

Modern Lives

Modern Lives

Modern Lives traces the development of the idea of "the lost generation" and reinterprets it in light of more recent versions of the American 1920s. Employing a wide range of historical, literary, and cultural theory, Marc Dolan focuses on American versions of "the lost generation," particularly as they emerged in the autobiographical writings of the generation's supposed "members." By examining the narrative and discursive forms that Ernest Hemingway, Malcolm Cowley, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and others imposed on the raw data of their lives, Dolan draws out the subtle relationships between personal and historical narratives of the early twentieth century, as well as the ways in which the mediating notion of a distinct "generation" allowed those authors to pass back and forth between "the personal" and "the historical." Written with the general Americanist rather than the theoretical specialist in mind, Modern Lives opens out the concept of "the lost generation" to reveal the clashing formulations of "self," "society," "nation," and "culture" that were contained within that concept and that continue to influence personal and national self-conceptions in America right down to the present day.

A Year of Writing Dangerously

A Year of Writing Dangerously

A Year of Writing Dangerously

Taking the reader on a quest for answers that leads from Foucault’s papers through World War I−era US Army records, the United States Tennis Association, and finally, the masterworks of the Lost Generation, A Year of Writing Dangerously is a must-read for any writer, scholar, or part-time athlete looking for enlightenment.